New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 14, 2011, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

January 14, 2011

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Friday, January 14, 2011

Pages available: 12

Previous edition: Thursday, January 13, 2011

Next edition: Saturday, January 15, 2011

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About New Braunfels Herald ZeitungAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 313,199

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.08+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 14, 2011

All text in the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung January 14, 2011, Page 4.

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 14, 2011, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4 — Herald-Zeitung — Friday, January 14, 2011 FORUM Herald-Zeitung Serving New Braunfeit and Carnal County time 1852. New Braunfels Zeitung was founded 1852, New Braunfels Herald was founded t890 The two papers merged in 1957 and printed in both German and English until 1958 Editor and Publisher Managing Editor Circulation Director Business Manager Advertising Director Doug Toney Autumn Phillips Jeff Fowler Rosie Willingham Timothy Tergeoglou Letters to the Editor Military and Homeland Security spending out of control New rules adopted by the House last week could have a negative effect on our government s ability to bring stability to the economy. Iliey allow the chair of the House Budget Committee, Rep. Paul Ryan (Wis.), to bypass the usual bipartisan consultation and decide by himself how much, and in what areas, the House will recommend that the U.S. government spend the public’s money. Ryan and other House leaders want to reduce federal spending only by cutting "domestic, non-security discretionary" spending. It’s essential to cut the budget and that especially includes the military and 1 lome I.and Security. I hree reasons - (1) They are extremely wasteful in their financial practices; (2) Gutting domestic policies alone won't save this economy from collapsing; and (3) The military and Homeland Security are out of control and not serving the interests of the citizens of the U.S. or abiding by the Constitution. This is a chance to curb the insane war-waging and bullying that this country continuously engages in along with the oppression of the U.S. citizenry by Homeland Security. While our congressman, Lamar Smith seems to be an honest man, voters are wising up to the fact that Congress has long been in the pockets of powerful lobbyists — especially when it comes to the military and now with I lomeland Security. Please contact your representative and tell them to include the military and Homeland Security in the budget cuts. Terry Cavanagh New Braunfels Drop those bottles, tin cans in recycling bin instead of trash Regarding Bradley Reininger’s letter about his dislike for recycling he states that his blue recycle bin has eight soda cans on recycling day, so I ask Mr. Reininger, how do you dispose of all your junk mail, newspapers, envelopes that bills come in, catalogs, magazines, boxboard, glass botdes and jars, tin cans (such as vegetable cans), plastic milk jugs? These are all items that should go into the blue recycle bin. Blanche Pape New Braunfels New pick-up schedule has made recycling easier We are very pleased with the new recycling cans and the weekly pick-up schedules. Now we do not bother to bundle the newspapers (after finding a place to store them for two or three weeks) and take them to the* school of our choice. We also do not fill our trunk with cardboard and take it to the recycling center on Butcher Street. We recycle more than soda cans. We also include all cans, and even the Christmas wrapping paper. Perhaps if a recent letter writer and the other two adults in his family would carefully sort their trash, they would have less regular trash and more recycling. The boxes in the regular trash should have been in the recycling—as any intelligent adult who can read the city's instructions should know. Vivian Nuhn New Braunfels Today in History Today is Friday, Jan. 14,2011. Today's Highlight in History: On Jan. 14, 1784, the United States ratified a peace treaty with England, ending the Revolutionary War. On this date: In 1639, the first constitution of Connecticut — the Fundamental Orders — was adopted. In 1858, Napoleon III, Emperor of the French, and his wife, Empress Eugenie, escaped an assassination attempt led by Italian revolutionary Felice Orsini, who was later captured and executed. In 1900, Puccini's opera "Tosca" had its world premiere in Rome. In 1943, President Franklin O. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and French General Charles de Gaulle opened a wartime conference in Casablanca. In 1952, NBC’s "Today" show premiered, with Dave Garroway as the host, or ’communicator," as he was officially known. In 1953, Josip Broz Tito was elected president of Yugoslavia by the country's Parliament. In 1963, George C. Wallace was sworn in as governor of Alabama with a pledge of "segregation forever." In 1968, the Green Bay Packers of the NFL defeated the ATL's Oakland Raiders, 33-14, in Super Bowl II. In 1969,27 people aboard the aircraft earner USS Enterprise, off Hawaii, were killed when a rocket warhead exploded, setting off a fire and additional explosions. In 1970, Diana Ross and the Supremes performed their last concert together, at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas. Ten years ago: The matchup for Super Bowl XXXV (35) was decided as the New York Giants shut out the Minnesota Vikings, 41-0, to win the NFC championship and the Baltimore Ravens beat the Oakland Raiders, 16-3, to gain the AFC title. Five years ago: The chief judge in Saddam Hussein's trial (Rizgar Mohammed Amin) submitted liis resignation (he was succeeded by Raouf Rasheed Abdel-Rah-man). Johnny Weir won his third straight title at the U.S. Figure Skating championships in St. Louis; Sasha Cohen won the women's division; Michelle Kwan was given a berth on the U.S. Olympic figure skating team. Academy Award-winning actress Shelley Winters died in Beverly Hills, Calif., at age 85. One year ago: President Barack Obama and the U.S. moved to take charge in earthquake-ravaged Haiti, dispatching thousands of troops along with tons of aid. Iraq's electoral commission barred 500 candidates from running in March 2010 parliamentary elections, including a prominent Sunni lawmaker, deepening sectarian divides. Today's Birthdays: CBS commentator Andy Rooney is 92. Actress Faye Dunaway is 70. Right-wingers dodge responsibility for Arizona shooting Probably every decent American had the same emotional reaction as former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor to the appalling events in her home state of Arizona. "It sounds like something that might happen in some place like Afghanistan,” O’Connor told the New York Times. “It shouldn't happen in Tucson." We keep saying that, but political assassinations and assassination attempts are more common in the United States than just about anywhere. During my adult life, lunatics with guns or GENELYONS Arkansas Democrat-Gazette columnist Gene Lyons is a National Magazine Award winner and co-author of "The Hunting of the President." E-mail Lyons at [email protected] charismatic celebrity in the United States is to wear a target — with or without Sarah Palin's help. That's along with events like the Columbine, Virginia Tech and Fort Hood massacres. Indeed, madmen with guns and obscure, often quasipolitical motives have become such a common feature of American life that it takes either a high-profile victim or a high body count to make national TV news — often the killer's fervent ambition. Atrocities occur so regularly that most of us know the post-traumat- Robert Kennedy the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Gov. George Wallace, President Ronald Reagan. One hundred sixty-eight innocent victims in Oklahoma City. Less successful attempts were also made against presidents Gerald Ford and Bill Clinton. Prior to the grievous wounding of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and the murder of six innocent bystanders, the only member of Congress assassinated in office was Rep. Leo Ryan, in Guyana, in connection with the 1978 Jonestown suicides people thing? They often say nobody could have predicted, but often somebody did. Why was such a disturbed individual walking around untreated? Don't we have hospitals for people like that? Finally, how can such a lone demento gain access to semiautomatic weapons? Shouldn't we keep deadly weapons out of the hands of crazy people? Goodness, we license dogs and motorcycles. We regulate fireworks and pain pills. Why not an episode of mass psychosis unique guns? Has America developed a col lt*k Alll* lifotim/kr    1    —      1.*    *    i    a in our lifetimes. To be a high-profile politician or lective death wish? But never mind the Freudian clap- trap. We also already know the answers. In our fragmented society, the archetypal paranoid loner is often cut off from family or community. (This appears not so with Rep. Giffords' assailant, Jared Loughner, although much remains unknown.) Most people who glimpse their psychoses feel no responsibility. It's safest to tiptoe away. In most jurisdictions, it's far too hard to have people committed to overcrowded, understaffed psychiatric hospitals. The college that expelled Loughner pending a mental-health evaluation appears never to have considered stronger actions. They would likely have been futile. Current law often reflects overblown fears evoked by pop-culture confections like "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," in which romantic rebels are persecuted for being different. The vast majority of people with brain diseases are actually less dangerous than the average man in the street. But partly because cases like Loughner's get so much attention, American mental health care remains both less robust and compassionate than it should be. As for guns, what's left to say? It’s come to this: Sen. Frank Lautenberg's, D-N.J., big reform idea is to outlaw 30-round ammo clips. So instead of carrying one Glock 9 mm with three clips, the next mad assassin would need to pack three Glocks for whacking congresswomen, judges, senior citizens and little girls. Alas, the argument over firearms has been lost to hairy-chested right- wingers for whom guns are totems: symbolic projections of manliness, virility and patriotism. What Sarah Palin — that name again — calls "Real Americans." Given Arizona's anything-goes climate, Jared Loughner broke no laws until he pulled the trigger. My own view is that what guns signify as political symbols, as opposed to tools, is a decidedly unmanly fear and lack of self-confidence. I would cite Loughner, a psychotic child playing cowboys in a suburban Safeway, as Exhibit A. But the argument's lost for the foreseeable future. Which brings us back to Sarah Palin. No, it’s not her fault in any legal or moral sense, although if somebody shot Palin herself after, say, Michael Moore put Alaska in the crosshairs, there would be hell to pay. It's not the fault of those yo-yo's swaggering around Tea Party meetings carrying assault weapons, displaying "Liberal Hunting Licenses," or listening to that Froot Loop Glenn Beck's delusional rants about President Obama's imaginary concentration camps. It's all just hijinks, satire, harmless joking. It's also not Rush Limbaugh's fault, nor Newt Gingrich's for writing that a Democratic president's "secular-socialist machine represents as great a threat to America as Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union once did." But you know how we're constantly being told how the Democrats are the party of no consequences, no personal responsibility and crippling moral relativism? United States Government PRESIDENT ■ Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20500 SENATE ■ Kay Bailey Hutchison Russell Senate Office Building Room 284 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224 5922 Fax: (202) 224-0776 Web: http://hutchison.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 145 Duncan Drive, Suite 120 San Antonio 78226 Telephone: (210) 340-2885 Fax: (210) 349-6753 ■ John Cornyn Russell Senate-Hart Room 517 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-2934 Fax: (202) 228-2856 Web: http://cornyn.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) AUSTIN OFFICE: 221 West Sixth St., Suite 1530 Austin 78701 Telephone: (512) 469-6034 Fax: (512) 469-6020 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 600 Navarro, Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 224-7485 Fax: (210) 224-8569 CONGRESSMAN ■ Lamar Smith Rayburn House Office Building Room 2409 Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-4236 Fax: (202) 225-8628 Web address: http://lamarsmith.house.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1100 NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 821-5024 Fax: (210) 821-5947 ■ Henry Cuellar 1404 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-1640 Fax: (202) 225-1641 Web address: http://www.house.gov/cuellar SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 615 E. Houston St. San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 271-2851 Fax: (210) 277-6671 GOVERNOR HOW TO CONTACT Texas Government 0« minimum ■ Rick Perry State Capitol, Room 2S.1 RO. Box 12428 Austin 78711 Telephone: (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 STATE HOUSE ■ Doug Miller EXT E 1.216 P.O. Box 2910 Austin TX 78768-2910 Telephone: (512) 463-0325 Fax: (512)463-5896 STATE SENATE ■ Jeff Wentworth 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 925 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 826-7800 WHILE IN AUSTIN: Telephone: 888-824-6984 E-mail address: jeff. wentworth @ senate, state.tx. us NEW BRAUNFELS CITY COUNCIL 424 S. Castell Ave. RO. Box 311747, New Braunfels, TX 78131-1747 (830) 221-4000 ■ Mayor Bruce Boyer bboyer@ nbtexas.org Telephone: Extension 4507 ■ Dist. 1 Councilor Richard Zapata [email protected] Telephone: Extension 4501 ■ Dist. 2 Councilor Mark Goodner [email protected] Telephone: Extension 4502 ■ Dist. 3 Councilor Mike Ybarra [email protected] Telephone: Extension 4503 ■ Dist. 4 Councilor Sandy Nolte [email protected] Telephone: Extension 4504 ■ Dist. 5 Councilor Kathleen Krueger kkrueger @ nbtexas.org Telephone: Extension 4505 ■ Dist. 6 Councilor Steven Digges [email protected] Telephone: Extension 4506 Comal County Commissioners' Court 199 Main Plaza New Braunfels,Tx 78130 (830) 221-1100 ■ COUNTY JUDGE SHERMAN KRAUSE krause @co.comal.tx.us Telephone: (830) 221-1105 ■ PCT. 1 COMMISSIONER DONNA ECCLESON [email protected] Telephone: (830) 221-1101 ■ PCT. 2 COMMISSIONER SCOn HAAG [email protected] Telephone: (830) 221-1102 ■ PCT. 3 COMMISSIONER GREG PARKER [email protected] Telephone: (830) 221-1103 ■ PCT. 4 COMMISSIONER JAN KENNADY [email protected] Telephone: (830) 221-1104 ;

RealCheck