New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 14, 2005, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

August 14, 2005

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Sunday, August 14, 2005

Pages available: 60

Previous edition: Saturday, August 13, 2005

Next edition: Tuesday, August 16, 2005

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About New Braunfels Herald ZeitungAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 312,117

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.07+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 14, 2005

All text in the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung August 14, 2005, Page 4.

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 14, 2005, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4A — Herald-Zeitung — Sunday, August 14, 2005 Herald-Zeitung FORUM Our Opinion Forward movement on civic center is a welcome change T We applaud the councils decision and encourage city officials to continue to march forward and build a civic center we can all be proud of. he New Braunfels City Council took a positive step Monday when council members agreed to let the city manager formalize a contract with an architect for the civic center. There is room to debate the amount of money being spent and what the expanded civic center will look like, but there is little doubt a step forward with the civic center is a positive move. Twice in recent years, voters in New Braunfels approved plans to either expand the civic center or build a convention center. Each time, voters clearly said they felt an improved civic center was something the community needed and something they would support funding. While the voters in New Braunfels have always been clear with their desire to improve the civic center, city council has been a little slower. After debating whether to build a convention center or expand the civic center, council finally settled on the civic center last year. Since then, residents have waited. Monday, the wait ended when council agreed to let an architect spend $10.5 million on the project. The vote was just a small step, and many more steps are needed before a finished product can be unveiled. But after years of waiting, any forward motion is a positive move. The debate over the civic center has gone on for too long. Voters in New Braunfels have had their say, not once, but twice. They want an improved civic center and, therefore, the city deserves a new civic center. We applaud the council’s decision and encourage city officials to continue to march forward and build a civic center we can itll be proud of. Today in History By The Associated Press Today is Sunday, Aug. 14, the 226th day of2005. There are 139 days left in the year. Today’s I lighlight in I listory: On Aug. 14,1945, President Truman announced that Japan had surrendered unconditionally, ending WWII. On this date: In 1848, the Oregon Territory was established. In 1917, China declared war on Germany and Austria during World War I. In 1935, the Social Security Act became law. In 1951. newspaper publisher William Randolph I learst died in Beverly I fills, Calif. In 1969, British troops arrived in Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics. In 1973, the U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt. In 1980, workers went on strike at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk, Poland, in a job action that resulted in the creation of the Solidarity labor movement. In 1980, President ('.arter and Vice President Walter Mondale were nominated for a second term at the Democratic national convention in New York. In 2003, a huge blackout hit the northeastern United States and part of Canada; 50 million people lost power. Serving New Braunfels anti Comal (.bunty since IS52. New Braunfels Zeitung was founded 1852; New Braunfels Herald was founded 1890 The two papers merged in 1957 and printed in both German and English until 1958. MMWHMiMM Managing Editor Gary E. Maitland Editor and Publisher Doug Toney Circulation Director Jeff Fowler Advertising Director Neice Bell Business Manager Valerie Shields News Editor David Rupkalvis m HOW TO CONTACT GUESTCOLUMN NBISD superintendent should focus attention upon schools I ’m wondering why the president of our chamber of commerce would come to the defense of our school district superintendent. Aren’t these, in fact, two separate entities? Is it because there is political back-scratching going on? Is it for brown-nosing? Or is it because the president of the chamber and the superintendent feel as though the Herald-Zeitung readers are uninformed? I think it’s probably all of the above. Regarding the superintendent’s extracurricular involvement, I, as a taxpayer, ask that he first successfully complete his responsibilities to our school district. We aren’t an exemplary district; we don’t score as well as our neighboring district on TAKS; our students aren’t prepared for the demands of college upon graduation. Supposedly, it’s viewed that his extracurricular activities provide him the opportunity to gain input from district residents. His job is to serve parents and students of this community, not business owners at the chamber, not tourists at Wurstfest. If he wants input, get it from the parents. I was at the Carl Schurz carnival. Where was he? I was at the Oak Run band concerts. Where was he? I have been to a number of New Braunfels school-related functions, and he was nowhere to be seen. Until these requirements are met, he should have absolutely no time for anything other than his job as superintendent. When Ron Reaves addressed the bullying problem at the middle school, he referred to a report as a single-page spreadsheet, attempting to lessen its severity. Once the school district was forced to release the report to parents, it was a 60-plus page printout. Was the superintendent hoping the parents of this district were as uninformed as he must think the Herald-Zeitung readers are — that they would not know that a spreadsheet document can contain hundreds of columns and rows and multiple sheets; of being honest and saying, yes, we do asiisSSHt paullaine Paul Laine is a New Braunfels resident. have a bullying problem? Yes, bullying has been going on since the beginning of time. By saying to the parents, Lets set up a positive program and see what we can do about this," in my opinion, he chose to be deceptive. Referring back to the July 31 column, I believe several of our superintendent’s said accomplishments to be untrue. I d like proof that the superintendent is responsible for these accomplishments. I d like to see the actual statistics that back these statements. Is this deception in itself, because the superintendent did not make these statements, the president of the chamber did? I understand that it must be a common practice to hire from outside the district. Superintendent Reaves has worked in many districts throughout Texas, as stated in the July 31 article. I wouldn't think this is a good thing. Is there no one in our community qualified to hold this position, someone who has raised children here and has permanent ties to the community, someone whose true loyalties lie in his position as superintendent and the future of education in the community of New Braunfels? LETTERS POLICY ■ Letters must be 250 words or less. ■ Guest columns should be 500 words or less and must be accompanied by a photo. ■ Address and telephone number must be included so authorship can be confirmed. Mail letters to:    Fax them to: Letters to Editor    (830) 606-3413 c'° H„8rald'Z,e;S    e-mail them to: RO. Drawer 311328    news@herald- New Braunfels, TX 78131-1328    zeitung.com mmsrnm United States Government PRESIDENT ■ George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20500 SENATE ■ Kay Bailey Hutchison Russell Senate Office Building Room 284 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-5922 Fax: (202) 224-0776 Web: http://hutchison.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 145 Duncan Drive, Suite 120 San Antonio 78226 Telephone: (210) 340-2885 Fax: (210) 349-6753 ■ John Cornyn Russell Senate-Hart Room 517 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-2934 Fax: (202) 228-2856 Web: http://cornyn.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) AUSTIN OFFICE: 221 West Sixth St., Suite 1530 Austin 78701 Telephone: (512) 469-6034 Fax: (512) 469-6020 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 600 Navarro, Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 224-7485 Fax: (210) 224-8569 CONGRESSMAN ■ Lamar Smith Rayburn House Office Building Room 2184 Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-4236 Fax: (202) 225-8628 Web address: http://lamarsmith.house.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1100 NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 821-5024 Fax: (210) 821-5947 ■ Henry Cuellar 1404 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-1640 Fax: (202) 225-1641 Web address: http://www.house.gov/cuellar SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1149 E. Commerce St., Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 271-2851 Fax: (210) 277-6671 GOVERNOR HOW TO CONTACT Texas Government > ■ Rick Perry State Capitol, Room 2S.1 PO. Box 12428 Austin 78711 Telephone: (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 STATE HOUSE ■ Carter Casteel 254 E. Mill St. New Braunfels 78130 Telephone: (830) 627-0215 Toll Free: (866) 687-4961 Fax: (830) 627-8895 E-mail address: carter.casteel (Chouse, state, tx. us STATE SENATE ■ Jeff Wentworth 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 720 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 826-7800 WHILE IN AUSTIN: Telephone: (512) 463-0125 Fax: (512) 463-7794 E-mail address: [email protected] s cautious optimism not reflected in polls \ v « CALTHOMAS Cal Thomas is a columnist for Tribune Media Services International. He hosts "After Hours" on Fox News Channel Saturdays at ll p.rn. EST. Direct all mail for Cal Thomas to: Tribune Media Services, 435 N. Michigan Ai>e, Suite 1500, Chicago. 60611, or leave an e-mail at www.calthomas. com. There are at least two presumptions some people make about the peace effort in Iraq (yes, I'm being semantically clever to make a point). One presumption is the falsehood that the United States can say “never mind,” stop its effort to help bring freedom and self-determination to J Iraq and, like magic, those who now hate and wish to destroy us will also say “never mind” and go back to killing each other instead of us. The other false presumption is that those who tell opinion pollsters they now oppose the war and think it makes America more vulnerable to terrorist attacks know what they are talking about. Their conclusions have been reached largely through television, which doesn’t always present a complete picture. Besides, how can a nation fixated on runaway brides, missing blondes and materialism be taken seriously when it comes to global matters of defeating terrorists and liberating nations? Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld sees a gap between opinion polls and what he has observed from recent visits to Iraq. During an interview at the Pentagon on Tuesday, I asked Rumsfeld about the latest USA Today/CNN/Gallup Poll that shows that 56 percent say the war is going badly, while 57 percent say the war has made America more vulnerable to terrorism. I Ie said the soldiers in Iraq “see the progress they are making and they are absolutely dumbfounded by what they see and the impression that’s left by America’s media here in the United States." Rumsfeld also said the Pentagon keeps track of what the Iraqi people think and they are “increasingly optimistic about the future of their country and increasingly negative about the insurgency.’’ Does this sound like Vietnam when political and military leaders talked about “turning the corner” and “fight at the end of the tunnel’’? “You haven’t heard words like that from me,’’ Rumsfeld answers. “What I see is a situation on the ground that is clearly a difficult one, let there be no doubt." I Ie forecasts increasing violence between now and when a constitution is drafted later this month and scheduled elections in December. Rumsfeld is deliberately vague in response to a question about Iran’s deci sion to resume its nuclear program. Iran claims it only wants to produce energy from nuclear power, but the U.S. believes it will manufacture nuclear weapons. At what moment, I asked, does this become a point of no return as it was for the Israelis who bombed Iraq’s nuclear reactor in 1981? “I don’t know,” he says, leaving himself the widest possible latitude for diplomatic or military responses. About insurgents coming into Iraq from Iran, he is more direct. In a Pentagon briefing, Rumsfeld said continuing to allow the insurgents into Iraq from Iran would ultimately be a problem for Iran. Was that a threat? “No, I wouldn’t use the word threat.’ I ’m from Chicago. If you’re going to cock it, you’d better throw it.” Rumsfeld explained he thinks that Iraq and neighboring countries “except for Syria" are not going to like Iran’s efforts to destabilize Iraq. “To have an unstable situation in Iraq is a dangerous thing for the Gulf states and for Jordan, Saudi Arabia (and) Turkey. I think you have to live with the effects of your acts.” Rumsfeld said recent media reports about alleged abuse of detainees are not new. Rather, he says, they are stories about past incidents that are coming out in pretrial hearings, or at proceedings where people have already been convicted of past abuse. I Ie also noted that al-Qaida operatives have been trained to say they have been tortured. Asked whether useful information has been extracted from detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Rumsfeld said, “There is no question that information provided by detainees in Guantanamo has saved American lives and saved the lives of people in other countries. It is aiding our body of knowledge about the global war on terror and it has been and will be useful." So, are we making progress? Are we safer? Rumsfeld says, “There is no way it s possible for any country to defend (itself) every minute of the day or night in every location against every conceivable technique or attack by a terrorist. Its just too easy to strap on a vest and blow people up if you’re willing to kill yourself.” But, he says, the pressure that’s on terrorists makes it “harder for them to move, communicate, raise money and recruit and maintain people.” If one accepts that terrorism will not end anytime soon, Rumsfeld’s summation of progress is cause for some optimism mid not the pessimism reflected in recent polls. ;

RealCheck