New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 12, 2005, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 12, 2005, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4A — Herald-Zeitung — Friday, August 12, 2005 FORUM Our Opinion Signs are nuisance, but what about all those billboards? The small, illegal signs people can now i remove are a nuisance, but I billboard signs I are even more I of a blight on the city's land- I scape. T he New Braunfels City Council put out a call for assistance Monday, asking all residents to be on the lookout for illegal signs. The signs, which are usually recognized as yard sale and , real estate signs, have become a growing nuisance in the city and are now considered trash. With the signs considered trash, residents are welcome and encouraged to remove them from public rights-of-wav. We support this move. New Braunfels is blessed with an abundance of natural beauty and everyone should pitch in to make sure it stays that way. Keeping the unauthorized signs that pop up each weekend off public property is one way to do that. The council’s vote this week will help with illegal signs, but another issue causing concern to the city’s natural beauty is the proliferation of billboards. The city has studied the issue for quite some time. We encourage the council to act quickly to regulate billboards. The small, illegal signs people can now remove are a nuisance, but billboard signs are even more of a blight on the city’s landscape. Removing the smaller signs is a start, but before groups head out and act as sign police, be sure to use caution. Not every sign that qualifies as a bandit sign is illegal. When driving around neighborhoods, it’s not uncommon for signs to he posted in front yards. The signs vary from political preferences to proud parents who have children playing for local sports teams. While those signs may technically be considered trash under the city’s new ordinance, pause and think before walking into someone’s yard. The signs may not be appealing, but this is Texas, and in Texas respecting private property' has always been of utmost importance. If you are interested in helping the city correct this growing problem, go out and pull the illegal v»m*    vyx-    .    T>\il careful to keep away from signs dotting private property. Today in History By The Associated Press Today is Friday, Aug. 12, the 224th day of 2005. There are 141 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Aug. 12,1944, Joseph R Kennedy Jr., eldest son of Joseph and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot when their explosives-laden Navy plane blew up over England. On this date: In 1867, President Andrew Johnson sparked a move to impeach him as he defied Congress by suspending Secretary’ of War Edwin M. Stanton. In 1898, the peace protocol ending the Spanish-American War was signed. In 1898, Hawaii was formally annexed to the United States. In 1953, the Soviet Union conducted a secret test of its first hydrogen bomb. In 1960, the first balloon satellite — the Echo I — was launched by the United States from Cape Canaveral, I la. Herald-Zeitung Serving New Braunfels and Comal Count}' since 1852. New Braunfels Zeitung was founded 1852; New Braunfels Herald was founded 1890 The two papers merged in 1957 and printed in both German and English until 1958. Managing Editor Gary E. Maitland Editor and Publisher Doug Toney Circulation Director Jeff Fowler Advertising Director Neice Bell Business Manager Valerie Shields News Editor David Rupkalvis GUESTCOLUMN Let tourism business flourish, but not at expense of history Let me reminisce a bit. Growing up in the 1940s in New' Braunfels was wonderful. Mom told me bedtime stories, often with mysterious creatures in the German forest, and Dad would take me on a Sunday country drive going out Wald Road. The drive in these forests reminded me of Mom’s stories. Utter, I learned that Prince Solms had already praised these forests in his reports to Germany. TS ow, wTi rn t taler my family clown mr samr road, it s named Wood Road. Wily are we letting our German memories slip away? I low is it that we can say Schlitterbahn with such gusto, but we are afraid to keep the name of one of our oldest roads, such as Wale! Road? Then I take the family to Panda Park. I tell them about the mill-race that Merriweather’s slaves dug at the entrance. But the signs by the bridges say Comal River. Why does our town have to practice history revisionism? That waterway is not the Comal River, it is a ditch dug by the slaves of an entrepreneur from Yankee Land. The Comal River flows from the lake, through the outdoor swimming pool, to the Guadalupe River. In the late 1750s, Spanish missionaries built a mission near what our first founders came to know as Mission I fill west of town. Then 120 years later, Johann Walzem built a small private chapel on his land. The stone edifice was a chapel, it was not a mission — it was a private chapel. Today, the small private chapel is put forth as the Walzem Mission, the development and the street names all have the flavor of a Spanish mission theme. One wonders what Johann Walzem would think today, to hear that his EVERETTFEY Everett Fey is a Nev • Braunfels resident. humble private chapel was now taunted as a Spanish mission. The Mission Valley community was even named after the Spanish mission long before Walzem’s chapel was planned. So, what’s going to go next? Shall we rename our rivers? The “Tubing River” and the “Schlitterbahn River” come to mind: the tourists would like that more than the Comal and Guadalupe rivers. Common Street can become “Water Park Avenue” in the summertime. Then again, maybe we should let go. When Prince Solms laid the cornerstone at the Sophienburg on April 28. 1845, by raising a German Hag on that hill, his dissatisfied colonists gathered on our Plaza and raised the Texas flag! So maybe its time for us to let go also! Maybe our towns ads about being a wonderful place “full of German history and customs” doesn’t have to ring true as long as it rings up sales in our tourist businesses. No, I’m kidding — certainly we want to invite visitors to our beautiful town, but don’t rewrite the names, the history and our wonderful traditions. As our ancestors, let us be honest, forthwith and real with our history; let us show what we are, what we have always been, and they will come! NOW TO CONTACT SM United States Government PRESIDENT ■ George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20500 SENATE ■ Kay Bailey Hutchison Russell Senate Office Building Room 284 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-5922 Fax: (202) 224-0776 Web: http://hutchison.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 145 Duncan Drive, Suite 120 San Antonio 78226 Telephone: (210) 340-2885 Fax: (210) 349-6753 ■ John Cornyn Russell Senate-Hart Room 517 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-2934 Fax: (202) 228-2856 Web: http://cornyn.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) AUSTIN OFFICE: 221 West Sixth St., Suite 1530 Austin 78701 Telephone: (512) 469-6034 Fax: (512) 469-6020 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 600 Navarro, Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 224-7485 Fax: (210) 224-8569 CONGRESSMAN ■ Lamar Smith Rayburn House Office Building Room 2184 Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-4236 Fax: (202) 225-8628 Web address: http://lamarsmith.house.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1100 NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 821-5024 Fax: (210) 821-5947 ■ Henry Cuellar 1404 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-1640 Fax: (202) 225-1641 Web address: http://www.house.gov/cuellar SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1149 E. Commerce St., Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 271-2851 Fax: (210) 277-6671 GOVERNOR HOW TO CONTACT Texas Government IIII1IIIIIIIIII ■ Rick Perry State Capitol, Room 2S.1 RO. Box 12428 Austin 78711 Telephone: (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 STATE HOUSE ■ Carter Casteel 254 E. Mill St. New Braunfels 78130 Telephone: (830) 627-0215 Toll Free: (866) 687-4961 Fax: (830) 627-8895 E-mail address: carter.casteel @ house.state.tx. us STATE SENATE ■ Jeff Wentworth 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 720 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 826-7800 WHILE IN AUSTIN: Telephone: (512) 463-0125 Fax: (512) 463-7794 E-mail address: jeff.wentworth^senate.state.tx.usDiary of jihadist indicates not everything is rosy for Islamofascists ANNCOULTER Ann Coulter is an attorney, author arui a columnist for Universal Press Syndicate. Since the London bombings, there has been a palpable feeling in the I air here in the U.S. that another terrorist attack is imminent. Maybe not as bad as 9 /11. perhaps a train or subway bombing. Or maybe it will be something worse. There were fevered rumors circulating over the last few weeks about massive attacks on New York and Washington scheduled for Aug. 6 and 9, to mark the anniversaries of I liro-shima and Nagasaki. But now Aug. 6 and 9 have come and gone. More significantly, 47 months have come and gone since 9/11 without a major terrorist attack on U.S. soil. The closest thing we had to a major bombing was the new Pauly Shore show on TBS. Even if the next attack comes tomorrow, it is worth pondering that we’ve gone 47 months without the savages being able to mount another terrorist attack in a country virtually designed for terrorist attacks, a country where we search the purses of little old ladies so that recent immigrants from Saudi Arabia named “Mohammed" wearing massive backpacks don’t get singled out. But instead of news stories about how we must be doing something right in the war on terror, we’re being carpet-bombed with news stories about how Bush does not have a "plan," the war was based on "lies,” we’re losing the war, the redcoats are coming! As Republicans were saying repeatedly — captured on Lexis-Nexis for a year before it showed up in a f rank Luntz talking points memo in 2004 — the savages have declared war, and its far preferable to fight them in the streets of Baghdad than in the streets of New York (where the residents would immediately surrender). That strategy appears to be working. Then again, maybe it’s just that its so hard to find parking in New York... Two weeks ago, Gen. Jack Keane, a former deputy chief of staff for the Army, said our forces in Iraq have killed or arrested more than 50,000 insurgents in the past six or seven months. It appears the majority of those were captured and released, but that may be good enough. Consider the intriguing diary entries of British jihadist Zeeshan Siddique, reported in The New York Limes this Monday (somewhat less prominently than the 4 billion front-page stories on Abu Ghraib). Siddique was captured last April in Pakistan by that country’s security forces. I lis diary is a sort of Plan-a-Jihad journal, much like California seventh-graders were required to write in 2002. (There’s also talk of publishing his diary under the title “Hello, Allah? Its Me, Siddique.’’) In addition to heartwarming entries like the one on the pope’s death — “Allah will throw him in h...” — a number of Siddique's diary entries suggest that it’s not all sunshine and song for the Islamofascists these days. Day after day for six weeks, it was nothing but bad news for Siddique — except for the good news about the pope’s death, Saul Bellow’s death and the Prince of Monaco’s death, all of which cheered him considerably. After visiting his fellow jihadists in early March, Siddique reports that he received “bad news” — and something tells me it wasn’t about Brad Pitt and Jennifer Anis-ton. I Ie writes: “The relaxing place was done over” and “7-8 of the guys taken whilst asleep.” He was told “guys need to make a move soon. Cant stick round.” A week later, he is informed by someone, probably not the Prince of Monaco, that “the situation is really bad" and he should “just sit tight and wait it out until things get a bit better.” Oddly enough he is also a Mets fan, so this spring was an all-around bummer for Siddique. A few weeks later, Siddique is vowing to make “an all out immense effort” to "rejoin my contingent.” And then he was captured, too, along with his diary and phone numbers for other al-Qaida operatives and his co-religionists in Britain involved in the failed subway bombing. If you made a movie of this bumbling nincompoop’s misadventures, you’d have to call it “Dude, Wheres My Car Bomb?” Siddique’s diary entries refer to Iraq Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari as “the dog of the Ii... fire” and Pakistan’s president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, as “Satan.” That’s not the talk of a winner! Siddique’s future as a jihadist may be fading, but he has a good shot at writing speeches for I loward Dean. Meanwhile, every time Americans get a gander at these lunatics ranting about the “Great Satan” and the "Zionist entity,” we can’t believe we’re at war with such a comical enemy. No wonder they dream of an afterlife with 72 hot teenage girls. These guys are klutzes. Nerds. Dweebs. In the Las Vegas of life they’re at the convention center with the other “Star’lYek" fans. Even in Pakistan, Siddique says he is “constantly laughed at and ridiculed.” Ahmed can’t get a date, and now die rest of us have to suffer. But you will notice, the jihadists are not pouring across the Syrian border to, say, Brooklyn Heights. They are running to Iraq, where they run smack dab into the glorious U.S. military. ;

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