New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, June 16, 2005, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

June 16, 2005

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Issue date: Thursday, June 16, 2005

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Next edition: Friday, June 17, 2005 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 16, 2005, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4A — Herald-Zeitung — Thursday, June 16, 2005 FORUM Other Viewpoints Responsibility for Internet safety rests with parents The El Paso Times on childrens Internet safety: Internet safety is always a concern, especially when it comes to children surfing and using the Net. Concern for that safety was reinforced by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer in a conversation with Associated Press reporters and editors... in Washington.... Ballmer said something that strikes right at the root of responsibility when it comes to computer safety: “We need to oversee and use technology and teach our children what’s appropriate. Some of it’s still going to have to come from parents kind of teaching their kids what’s right. That was true even before the Internet." That puts responsibility right where it should be — with the parents. Just as parents should monitor what their children watch on television, they should know what their kids are doing on the computers that are so ubiquitous these days. The possibilities of children getting in over their heads when it comes to the Internet are many, ranging from Internet porn sites to chat rooms to computer dating. Computers are wonderful tools that just keep growing in popularity and uses. The Internet can be invaluable, playing a huge part in education and entertainment for young people. But kids can’t — shouldn’t — be turned loose on computers with no supervision. The Internet is a great resource — when well-supervised and used with care and common sense. Today in History By The Associated Press Today is Thursday, June lh. the 167th day of2005. There are 198 days left in the year. Today’s I lightight in I listory: On June 16, 1868, in a speech in Springfield, 111., Senate candidate Abraham Lincoln said the slavery issue had to be resolved, declaring, “A house divided against itself cannot stand." On this date: In 1897, the government signed a treaty of annexation with I lawaii. In 1903, Ford Motor Co. was incorporated. In 1932, President Hoover and Vice President Charles Curtis were renominated at the Republican national convention in Chicago. In 1955, Pope Pius XU excommunicated Argentine President Juan Domingo Peron — a ban that was lifted eight years later. In 1963, the world’s first female space traveler, Valentina Tereshkova, was launched into orbit by the Soviet Union aboard Vostok 6. In 1977, Soviet Communist Party General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev was named president, becoming the first person to hold both posts simultaneously. LETTERS POLICY ■ Letters must be 250 words or less. ■The Herald-Zeitung reserves the right to edit all submissions. ■ Guest columns should be 500 words or less and must be accompanied by a photo. ■ Address and telephone number must be included so authorship can be confirmed. Mail letters to: Letters to Editor co Herald-Zeitung PO. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, TX 78131-1328 Fax them to: (830) 606-3413 e-mail them to: news(®herald- Herald-Zeitung Serving New Braunfels arui ( 'antal County since IHS2. New Braunfels Zeitung was founded 1852; New Braunfels Herald was founded 1890 The two papers merged in 1957 and printed in both German and English until 1958 Managing Editor Gary E. Maitland Editor and Publisher Doug Toney Circulation Director Jeff Fowler Advertising Director Neice Bell Business Manager Valerie Shields News Editor David Rupkalvis " JUST TELL US ONE GOOD STORY THAT EMBARRASSES THE WHITE HOUSE AND YOU'LL BE OUT OF HERE / " Focus life’s efforts on things you can actually do something about A super volcano, such as supposedly lies under Yellowstone Park, could erupt and wipe us out. On the other hand, a large meteor or a comet could crash into us and extinguish life on Earth. If our universe keeps expanding, we will all die, but if it stops expanding and starts to contract, that will kill us, too. But don’t worry about that, because another galaxy is on a collision course with our own, and that will certainly do us in. That is a summary of the stuff that passes for science shows on television. On the tube, everything must he melodramatic, and now, thanks to computer graphics, the show’s producers can actually show us a simulation of the horrible disasters that might overtake us. Well, since our life span is measured in decades instead of millennia, much less mil-I wouldn’t worry about any of CHARLEYREESE Charley Reese is a columnist for King Features Syndicate. You can write to him at RO. Box 2446, Orlando, Fla. 32802. lions of years, the above. There are two little words that will always tip you off to journalistic hype. They are “may” and “could.” Whenever you see those words, turn the show off or toss what you’re reading into the trash can. literally anything could happen or may happen, hut we should concern ourselves only with what will probably happen in our own lifetime. Besides, there is nothing we can do about galaxies, super volcanoes, comets, meteors and the expanding and/or contracting universe. Leave those to God, and let us attend to tile less dramatic but nevertheless important problems we can actually do something about. We can, for example, learn to become better stewards of the earth. We can work to improve the education system and to edu cate ourselves so that we can make better decisions in our own personal and political affairs. We can work for peace, because nuclear war is a much more likely scenario than any geological or astronomical disaster. Global warming may create new waterfront property, hut a nuclear explosion will create a really mass graveyard. We can work on developing compassion and on helping other people who are hurting. One of the illusions we in America all have at one time or another is the belief that if we can just create the right system, everybody can be prosperous and healthy. Sadly, that is not so. Some people just have bad luck. Some people just don’t have what it takes to win the rat race. There will always be people who are poor and sick. Our choice is either to follow Ayu Rand s path and let them perish while we pursue our own selfish interests, or to follow the path of Christianity, Buddhism and Islam and feed the hungry, clothe the naked and minister to the sick. The latter choice is not a program to end hunger or poverty. That’s utopianism. It is rather a duty that will go on for generations. As long as the human race exists, there will be poverty and illness. They can be ameliorated hut not eliminated. We can and certainly should begin now to plan for the end of oil. Whether so-called peak oil comes sooner or later, it will come, and it will require drastic changes in the way we live. It is our bad luck to be living at the end of the Fossil Fuel Age, but on the other hand, it will give us plenty of challenges and things to do. If we do it right, we might even produce a better world. After all, we’ve learned from experience that traffic jams and suburban sprawl are not that desirable. It is possible to live comfortably while using a whole lot less energy than we do now. I lived in the Deep South for the first 27 years of my life without air conditioning, and if necessary', I can do it again. i fHOW TO CONTACT nVW rn w wwni iJWif ■ . •• I United States Government PRESIDENT ■ George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20500 SENATE ■ Kay Bailey Hutchison Russell Senate Office Building Room 284 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-5922 Fax: (202) 224-0776 Web: (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 145 Duncan Drive, Suite 120 San Antonio 78226 Telephone: (210) 340-2885 Fax: (210) 349-6753 ■ John Cornyn Russell Senate-Hart Room 517 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-2934 Fax: (202) 228-2856 Web: (Send e-mails through Web site.) AUSTIN OFFICE: 221 West Sixth St., Suite 1530 Austin 78701 Telephone: (512)469-6034 Fax: (512) 469-6020 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 600 Navarro, Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 224-7485 Fax: (210) 224-8569 CONGRESSMAN ■ Lamar Smith Rayburn House Office Building Room 2184 Washington, D C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-4236 Fax: (202) 225-8628 Web address: (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: HOO NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 821-5024 Fax: (210) 821-5947 ■ Henry Cuellar 1404 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-1640 Fax: (202) 225-1641 Web address: SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 1149 E. Commerce St., Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 271-2851 Fax: (210) 277-6671 GOVERNOR HOW TO CONTACT Texas Government N Rick Perry State Capitol, Room 2S.1 PO. Box 12428 Austin 78711 Telephone: (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 STATE HOUSE N Carter Casteel 254 E. Mill St. New Braunfels 78130 Telephone: (830) 627-0215 Toll Free: (866) 687-4961 Fax: (830) 627-8895 E-mail address: [email protected] STATE SENATE N Jeff Wentworth 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 720 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 826-7800 Fax: (210) 826-0571 E-mail address: [email protected] adds another ‘bozo’ to his list of appointments MOLLYIVINS Molly Ivin is a columnist for Creators Syndicate She abo does occasional commentary for National Public Radio and the McNeil/Lehrer program. AUSTIN — Sometimes you look at the people Bush appoints to high public office and the only possible response is," What were they thinking?” Zalmay Khalilzad for U.S. ambassador to Iraq? Why not just send Richard Perle? Khalilzad is a second-rank neocon ^ with all the same credentials as the rest of those bozos — preemptive war, world hegemony, Project for a New American Century ... the whole stinking lot of it. Plus, he's been a big booster for Iran’s ayatollahs, the Afghani Mujahideen and the Ialiban, not to mention an oil company consultant. Isn t that just jim-dandy? What this tells us is that the administration has learned exactly nothing from the past three years of insurgency in Iraq. The 1,700-dead, $1 bil-lion-a-week mistake will continue to he run in exactly the same way we have already proved doesn’t work. We’ll keep trying to put out a growing insurgency with too small an army as the country drifts ever-closer to civil war. It’s like Ben Franklin’s definition of insanity — doing the same thing over and over, expecting different results. As one who has long argued that George W. Bush is not stupid, I must admit that not learning from your mistakes is a prime signal of stupidity. But, of course, in order to learn from your mistakes, you have to recognize you made them. The president assured us just last week he is “heartened” by what is happening in Iraq and, “I am pleased with the progress.” The vice president says there is “major progress” and the insurgency is in its “last throes.” These folks are in such deep denial. Chris Cox, now theres an appointment of near-genius level. I ley, is this the man you would put in charge of the Securities and Exchange (Commission to protect investors from greedy, capitalist crooks? Cox, a Republican from Orange County, (Calif., helped produce the Enron mess and subsequent scandals in tile first place. Just the guy for the job! Cox led the fight in 1995 to pass the "Private Securities and Litigation Reform Act,” which provided extensive legal protections to corporate executives, accountants and lawyers who make misleading statements. The law paved the way for corporate executives to lie without fear of being sued — it’s the Ken I.ay Protection Act. In 2(X)2, (Cox said he “rejected the notion that Enrolls meltdown should cause Congress to rethink deregulation." The guy’s home state was ripped off for $10 billion by Enron. I lere’s another one who can't learn from his mistakes. Of course, the fact that he’s gotten more than $640,000 in campaign money from the very people he will now be regulating has nothing to do with his views. Cox, according to The New York Times, is a devotee of Ayn Rand, the high priestess of unregulated capitalism. On announcing the Cox appointment, Bush said, “As a champion of the free-enterprise system in Congress, Chris (Cox knows that a free economy is built on trust.” Trust? I low about trust but verify? While working for the law firm of Lath-am & Watkins, Cox himself was sued, according to the Ixis Angeles Times, for work that involved him in a business scheme that robbed nearly 8,000 investors of approximately $136 million. The scheme cheated customers out of their retirement nest eggs by enticing them to invest in phony mortgages. I ligh-level officers of the company pled guilty. The charge against Cox was that he helped write a deceptive plan to sell mutual fund shares. Cox claimed ignorance and said he was only distantly involved, but The Associated Press later uncovered documents that showed him to be more involved with the convicted dealer than he previously let on. And a new development in the most ludicrous nomination yet, John Bolton, Mr. Diplomacy, for ambassador to the United Nations. It turns out that in addition to trying to get American intelligence analysts who disagreed with him fired, Bolton axed an international civil servant for having the temerity to do his job. In 2001, Jose Bustard, head of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), says Bolton “telephoned me to try to interfere, in a menacing tone, in decisions that are the exclusive responsibility of the director-general." Bolton was opposed to Bustard's effort to get Iraq and other Arab countries involved in the OPCW. Bustani aide Bob Bigg of New Zealand said: “Wily did they not want OPCW involved in Iraq? They felt they couldn’t rely on OPCW to come up with the findings the U.S. wanted." Bolton then arranged to have Bustani fired in a way a U.N. tribunal has since said was “unlawful.” I’ll bet they just can’t wait to see Bolton’s mustache up at the United Nations. Flow could we possibly make more friends there? As I ’m sure Chris Cox can tell us, in business, “goodwill” is considered an asset. ;