New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 14, 2005

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 14, 2005, New Braunfels, Texas s’EWM'» srar?™ ll ^IM IX lmi •llllllllllLlnll II I /I 780 SPORTS GAME TIME New Braunfels girls soccer team will face stiff challenge against McKinney in state semifinals. Page 8A LIBRARY WEEK CELEBRATION The New Braunfels Public Library celebrates National Library Week with special events. Page 4A Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. Vol. 154, No. 126 16 pages, 2 sections CLICK 500 www: j 8 00001 i Details .... 1B DEAR ABBY 3B CLASSIFIEDS 4B COMICS 2B CROSSWORD 2B FORUM 6A OBITUARIES 3A SPORTS 8A TV GRIDS 3BCharter changes not likely to exdte voters By Scott Mahon Staff Writer Voters in the New Braunfels city election will face the daunting task of voting on 39 city charter amendments, a task that may prove difficult for the average voter. City election officials said this week it would take on average six to eight minutes to complete the ballot. The city charter has not been amended since 1995. Last year, a charter review committee spent months reviewing the charter and making recommendations for changes. City Attorney Charlie Zech said this week that some amendments were intended to simplify the existing language in the city’s charter. For instance, Proposition I on the ballot reads, “The amendments of Sections 1.04 and 1.05 of the City Charter consolidating the City’s authority to extend and contract its boundaries and require the extension and contraction of boundaries be accomplished pursuant to the See CHARTER Page 2A Candidates agree developers should pay for drainage By Scott Mahon Staff Writer All six candidates bidding for a place on city council in May s election agreed on one thing Wednesday — developers should pay a drainage impact fee. Kathleen Krueger, who is running for the District 5 seat, said developers should pay their fair share toward funding drainage projects. “New Braunfels is being threatened by high density development,” she said. “And developers make a lot of money, so I absolutely support drainage impact fees.” lier opponent, Travis Wommack, said although he was young, he would be passionate in fighting for police, fire and drainage issues that have become a problem due largley to high density developments. “Its unfortunate some developers don’t take responsibility for their actions,” he said. “But there’s a difference between custom home builders and high density developers, and it’s the high density developers that are causing the problems.” More ti I tin 50 people attended a candidate forum Wednesday at the Comal County Senior Citizen Center. Election Saturday, 9 to 10:30 a.m. — Hosted by radio station KGNB. Satin day, 1 p.m. — Hosted by Holy Family Church at 245 South Hildago Ave. Monday, 7 p.m. — Hosted by The New Braunfels Republican Women at the Brauntex Theatre. Tuesday, 6 p.m. — Hosted by the League of Women Voters at the Municipal Building, 424 South Caste!!. In his opening remarks, District 6 Councilman Ken Valentine said he supported a petition last year that eventually led to a tax freeze for seniors. Valentine also said he supported drainage impact fees, saying the fee should be in line with the national average of $ I, IOO per lot. See FORUM Page 3A Celebrating heroes The I lerald-Zeitung hosts a special celebration to name the Citizen of the Year and several ‘Unsung Heroes.’ TRUE HEROES Trio give of themselves to help co-worker By Melissa McCaghren Copy Editor Paul Serna spends his days fighting a life and death battle with cancer. But he is not fighting alone. Barbara Cobb, Helen Oppelt and Carmen Vargas, all workers at New Braunfels Leather, volunteer their time and hearts to help Serna as he deals with chemotherapy and other medical treatments. Continuing a family tradition, Serna has worked at the New Braunfels Leather for 47 years. His father also worked at the tannery before Serna joined the business. When he found out he had cancer, his co-workers immediately came to his aid. Cobb has been driving Serna to and from the center for his cancer treatments since die first day. She has seen him through 35 treatments, each at the Cancer Therapy Research Center, located on the other side of San Antonio. “I’ve pretty much taken him to all appointments,” she said. When Serna was originally going to begin treatments, Cobb said she would have taken him to Houston, or anywhere he needed to go. She said Serna was the type of person who doesn’t like to bother anyone. “You have to push and prod Paul to get him going,” she said. When they go to treat- UNSUNG HEROES CELEBRATION * What: The Herald-Zeitung honors a Citizen of the Year and several Unsung Heroes for giving selfessly of themselves to help others in the community. ■ When: 5:30 p.m. today '4 Where: Seekatz Opera House, 256 W. San Antonio St., New Braunfels Seekatz Opera House DAVID INGRAM/Herald-Zeitung Barbara Cobb, front, Carmen Vargas and Helen Oppelt were named Unsung Heroes for giving of themselves to help a co-worker with cancer. ments, Cobb stays with Serna through it all. She also listens to what the doctor says. “It helps if you have two people listening to the events. I go to all his appointments," she said. Staying with Serna also helped him in one case, See HERO Page 3A Mi iv iv bi wiwm>vi/1 lei aiu totiui iy New Braunfels Historic Railroad and Modeler's Society vice-president of modeling, Stephen Kurtz, makes sure everything is up an running. The club's annual Model Train Jamboree takes place Saturday at three different locations around town. Model railroads bring out the kid in everyone By Ron Maloney Staff Writer Some folks live, breathe and even eat railroads — just ask the folks who breakfast at the Union Street Station. They love the sound of steel wheels on rails and can tell by listening to a whistle as freights rumble through New Braunfels at night which direction the train is going. A few of them have closets filii of Tyco or Iionel trains or entire model train layouts in their spare rooms or garages. For all of those folks, the New Braunfels Historic Railroad Modelers Society is conducting its 18th annual Model Railroad Jamboree from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. The show features nearly 200 model railroading vendors at the New Braunfels Civic Center, dozens of train layouts at the Elks Club across Seguin Avenue, a working Union Pacific engine on the siding next to city hall and, at the New Braunfels Railroad Museum in the old train depot a few blocks away on West San Antonio Street, working HO and N scale train layouts and displays that tell the railroading history of New Braunfels. Stephen Kurtz is one of those folks who loves trains. The railroad society’s vice president of modeling, Kurtz and several volunteers have been working Monday nights to restore die old I IO scale train layout in die depot — and will have it up and running for Saturday’s jamboree with up to three trains operating at once. If Kurtz has an open window at his residence outside New Braunfels, he can hear the trains and their wlustles — which, to a trained ear, identifies its engineer as surely as a fingerprint. He can just about feel the ground shake and smell the creosote as tin* heat broils it out of old railroad ties. “That whistle just awakens you — it draws you in,” Kurtz said. “You can watch the train go by, and it carries something along with it — a spirit.” Kurtz, now in his late 40s, has what railroad men and modelers everywhere call "the bug.” In his case, it s his grandfather’s fault. See TRAIN Page 5AWRIGHT APRIL IS ALCOHOLDISTRIBUTING CO. AWARENESS MONTH ©2005 Miller Brewing Co., Ft. Worth, TX ;