New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 3, 2005, Page 9

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

April 03, 2005

View full pageStart a free trial

Issue date: Sunday, April 3, 2005

Pages available: 60

Previous edition: Saturday, April 2, 2005

Next edition: Tuesday, April 5, 2005 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication


  • 2.13+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Find your ancestors now
Start your Genealogy Search now
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 03, 2005

Get access to these newspapers Plus 2.13+ billion other articles

OCR Text

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 3, 2005, New Braunfels, Texas COMING TUESDAY Tough trio remains Canyon, NB and SY girls soccer playoffs. Men's national championship J More soccer playoffs T Illinois, North Carolina square I u Three area teams continue action I u off for it all in St. Louis in state soccer tournament lime: 8 p.m. E Times: TEA El NS al Canyon Crosstown rivals go at it in baseball, softball Time: 7 p m. Daniela Rivera, 10, takes SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 2005 her turn shooting the ball. SPORTS Section B Herald-Zeitung To have your sports event publicized contact Will Wright at 625-9144, ext 223 or by e mail at [email protected] zeitung.corrCanyon on road; NB, SY girls closer to home as soccer playoffs continue By Will Wright Sports Editor Three area soccer teams have set times and sites for their state playoff games Tuesday. In Class 4A, Canyon’s girls (24-2-2) will face Gregory-Portland (16-2-2) in a Region IV semifinal at 7 p.m. in Beeville. The District 28-4A champions defeated I,ake Travis 3-0 Friday at Smithson Valley’s Ranger Stadium. Sarah Redwine had two goals and Amy Statler scored another as all three came within an 11-minute span in the first half for the Cougarettes. The New Braunfels girls (20-8-1) will take on Pleasanton at 7 p.m. at Northside ISD’s Farris Stadium in San Antonio. New Braunfels blew out Alamo Heights 7-2 Friday. It was the Unicorns’ second win over the Mules this season. Six different players, scored for the Unicorns, who had two tallies by Michelle Whitley. “It was a good game — we played well,” said New Braunfels coach Al Dressen, whose team defeated the Mules 1-0 early this season. “Alamo Heights played better than they had before, but then again, so did we. “We were pretty much on our game and we did a good job.’’ Canyon and New Braunfels stand one game away from a rubber game in their season series. Wins by both Tuesday would set up a showdown for the Region IV title and trip to the state tournament. In Class 5A, Smithson Valley had the lone score by Marcey Morales as the Rangers (15-6-4) edged Cor pus Christi King 1-0 Friday in Corpus Christi. The Lady Rangers will play top-ranked SA MacArthur (19-3-2), a 2-0 winner over SA O’Connor Friday, in a regional quarterfinal at 6 p.m. at Ranger Stadium. The winner will advance to the Region IV tournament next weekend at NEISD’s Blossom Athletic Center.With all the drama at NB, young search for new coach will be restless WOMEN’S FINAL :    FOUR At Indianapolis I TV; ESPN TODAY’S NATIONAL SEMIFINALS : • LSU (33-2) vs. Baylor (31-3), 6 p.m. Tennessee (30-4) vs. Michigan State (32-3), 8:30 7. p.m. r ** V    TUESDAY’S ; NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP -I Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.; There’s no favorite in women’s 4 rn ! INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Michigan State is back where it started the postseason, Baylor is riding a surge “'•of community support abd LSU comes in with a quiet determination. * * And Tennessee is, well, the same of Tennessee — confident, experienced and eager to end a national championship drought that probably seems like decades to the Lady Vols but in reality is six years. It’s a women’s Final Four with good stories but no clear-cut favorite. Yes, Tennessee (30-4) has come this far for the fourth straight year and 16th time overall and owns more NCAA titles (sue) than any other school. But the Lady Vols’ opponent in tonight’s semifinals, Michigan State (32-3), already has beaten No. I-ranked Stanford in this tournament, has exceptional teamwork and isn’t likely to be intimidated. LSU (33-2), the No. I overall seed in the NCAA tournament, has a unanimous All-American in Seimone Augustus and brings experience from its Final Four trip last See WOMEN, Page 2B verse Judson. “It’s not like they didn’t know it wasn’t coming,’’ he said on his way out the door. “I loved being a head coach — it was tough dealing with some of the things that came with being athletic director." Rhoades’ woes with his higher-ups were inside knowledge that finally became public Wednesday. The Austin paper reported what everyone’s known all along — that his run-ins with assistant superintendent Janet Patton and principal Debbie Garinger over issues that included his footballers staying in athletic period over participating in other sports, basketball in particular. He had enough support with the school board to spare his reassignment by superintendent Ron Reaves, who, after setting two deadlines for Rhoades to decide his future, wound up relenting. In the Austin article, Rhoades expressed dissatisfaction over the lower pay NBISD coaches received in comparison to their Comal ISD counterparts, but that’s neither here nor there. You get paid what you get paid. IYuth is, had he gone 10-0 last season and went three rounds deep in the playoffs, I doubt he would have been challenged about anything. Rhoades’ exit took three months and a lot of drama before it finally happened. He became the first to leave before the school year ended, but the third coach to change direction. Boys basketball coach Tommy Hines took the train soon after leading the team to its first playoff berth in nine years. And Reaves announced girls basketball coach Larry Schulte asked to be reassigned, but I hear there wasn’t a choice for Schulte to make. His realignment, which happened the week before spring break, wasn’t publicized. I guess no one needed to know. All of this brings us to the abrupt departure of Knapik, who had actu ally resigned in November but was talked into staying on for this season. According to Reaves, she asked for her immediate release Wednesday, when, in the Super’s words, she had suddenly had enough. Come on. No coach in their right mind leaves a team in midseason unless they’re dead or forced out. In Friday’s San Antonio paper, Knapik indeed said spending more time with her family was paramount for her, and that raising a 9-month-old and directing a team while being separated from her husband became too much to bear. The article also said her “200-mile daily commute’’ from LaGrange to New Braunfels also figured into her decision. We’ll leave that one alone. It was all very touching. However, it stopped short of the whole story. Nowhere in that article was it mentioned what Reaves told us, which was that Knapik faced legal issues See WRIGHT, Page 2B Several weeks ago I surmised there was trouble with the New Braunfels athletic program. This past week’s dramas more than bear that out. Football coach and AD Rick Rhoades and softball coach Tracy Knapik became the latest to leave the Hill. Rhoades’ leaving was expected; Knapik’s exit was also expected, it just wasn’t quite so soon. Who’s running the show? I haven’t the slightest. I do know what lies underneath, and these Genoa City-type happenings can’t help chances that Rhoades’ successor will come from anywhere except from within. Since no one wants to go on the record, I’ll stick to what I’ve gathered off the record from coaches, parents and even the kids themselves. I’ve been waiting a while to let loose, so here goes. Lets’ start with Rhoades, who left Tuesday for newer, more comfortable digs as the assistant head coach and defensive coordinator at Con Wide-eyed wondering Illini, Tar Heels in NCAA title game MILLWRIGHT * Will Wright is the sports editor of the Herald-Zeitung. MEN’S FINAL FOUR At St. Louis TV: CBS; Radio: KTRK-AM 760 SATURDAY’S NATIONAL SEMIFINALS Illinois 72, Louisville 57 North Carolina 87, Michigan State 71 MONDAY NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP Illinois (37-1) vs. North Carolina (32-4), 8:18 p.m. ond half to reclaim the lead, made 11 of their first 15 shots to take control and spent the final minutes putting on an emphatic dunkfest. May, held to 2-of-8 shooting in the first half, hit 7 of IO shots over the final 20 minutes. In fact, the Tar Heels had surpassed their scoring output for the first half witli more than IO minutes left in the game. They finished right at their nation’s-best scoring average of 88.8 points per game. I^d by May, North Carolina dominated on the inside, finishing with a commanding 46-28 edge for points in the lane. The final is a matchup between two sentimental coaching favorites. The mother of Illinois’ Bruce Weber died last month during die Big Ten tournament. Then theres Williams, who never quite could take Kansas all the way. Williams, who’s willing to put his emotions on display for all to see, went through a gut-wrenching decision to leave the Jayhawks when die Carolina called him home two years ago. Williams is a Tar Heel through and through — a North Carolina native, he went to school in Chapel I fill, See NCAA, Page 2B DAVID INGRAM/Herald Zeitung Gabriela Rivera, 8, carefully eyes the hoop before making her shot Saturday during the a pass, dribble and shoot competition at the Westside Community Center. The Associated Press ST. LOUIS — Roy Williams has another chance to win that elusive national championship. Maybe he just needed to come home. North Carolina showed off a dizzying display of weapons in the Final Four, blowing out Michigan State in the second half on the way to an 87-71 victory Saturday night that sent the Tar Heels to the title game against top-ranked Illinois. Sean May scored 22 points — all but four after halftime — and Jawad Williams added 20. Rashad McCants had 17. And Raymond Felton chipped in with 16 while running the point. This is a deep, talented bunch — and perhaps the best chance yet for coach Williams to finally win the last game of the season. He went 0-for-4 in the Final l our during 15 years at Kansas, losing twice in the championship game. The Tar Heels (32-4) certainly have their work ait out for them Monday night, taking on an Illinois team that has lost only once and was ranked No. I much of the season. Hie Illini cruised past Louisville 72-57 in the first semifinal Saturday. But North Carolina ended the regular season ranked second, setting up the first 1-2 matchup in the final since UCLA defeated Kentucky in 1975. Michigan State (26-7), which already had knocked off Duke and Kentucky in the regional, seemed poised to knock off another member of college basketball ’s royalty. The feisty Spartans shut down May, crashed the boards relentlessly and led 38-33 at halftime. But North Carolina scored the first six points of the sec- Pitching must propel Astros early HOUSTON (AP) — Weeks after the Houston Astros came IO outs short of their first World Series, Roger Clemens was again leaning toward retirement. Why not? The Rocket had virtually nothing left to accomplish after a remarkable 21-year career in the majors that included 328 wins, seven Cy Young Awards and three World Series rings. But before he could decide to retire, Clemens would always think of that sullen visitors’ clubhouse in St Louis following the Game 7 loss against the Cardinals. Regardless of his personal triumphs, Clemens still had some goals with his hometown Astros. Lance Berkman “I want these guys to be able to experience not only playing in a World Series but winning one,” Clemens said. “If by my coming back this year we can get that accomplished, then it will be very gratifying.” Houston will need even more from the Rocket this season: his decision to stay was one of the few bright spots in an otherwise miserable offseason for the Astros. See ASTROS, Page 3B ;