New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, July 8, 2004

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

July 08, 2004

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Issue date: Thursday, July 8, 2004

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Wednesday, July 7, 2004

Next edition: Friday, July 9, 2004 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - July 8, 2004, New Braunfels, Texas *01 1000571 • r * UK EL PASO TX 79983 SPORTS HICKIN' IT Photos from Cross Community Center's free kids soccer camp at the H-E-B sports fields, which continues today. Page 5 TI THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2004 ^rald-Zeitung FORUM BUSH BACKERS Readers respond to letter writers who voice disagreements with President Bush and the war on terror. Page 4 Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. Vol. 153, No. 206 10 pages. 1 section CLICK WWW. fcL'L-.X-L'-J. -i. .    ’’v    •    y'*:" 500 56825 000011 Partly ! cloudy High Low 95 74 Details 6 DEAR ABBY CLASSIFIEDS COMICS CROSSWORD FORUM OBITUARIES SPORTS TV GRIDSMan could face attempted murder charge i John Edward Morris By Ron Maloney Staff Writer The 41-year-old Colorado man shot Tuesday by a sheriff’s deputy faces attempted capital murder charges if he recovers from his wounds. John Edward Morris fled Colorado after an alleged robbery, kidnapping and assault incident June 24 in Clear Creek County. Investigators are working to reconstruct his movements in the days that led up to his being shot Tuesday morning when he pulled a shotgun on sheriff’s Deputy Brett Smith. The deputy fired six shots from his automatic handgun, striJdng Morris three times in the chest. Canyon Lake Fire/EMS paramedics treated Morris at the scene of the incident off Old Cranes Mill Road and flew him to University Hospital. Smith, 43, escaped injury. University Hospital officials Wednesday would release no information about Morris’ condition, saying the file was stamped “confidential.” Law enforcement officials said they did not ask that the file be closed. Smith is being guarded by Comal County Sheriff’s deputies. He will be charged with attempted capital murder, a first-degree felony punishable by between five and 99 years in state prison. Clear Creek County Sheriff’s Detective Mark Douglas said Wednesday Colorado authorities would be interested in prosecuting Morris after he faces charges in Texas. He is wanted on felony charges stemming from a June 24 incident in which he struck a bicyclist and attempted to kidnap her from a Colorado highway. Morris is charged with assault with a deadly weapon, kidnapping during the course of a robbery and aggravated robbery. See SNOUTING, Page 3 Man hopes to preserve city’s history and heritage Red, blue and yellow glass bottles line the tall, narrow front windows. Tiny bottles of decades-old medicinal potions are stacked in glass-door cabinets made in 1910. Alfred E. Newman’s gaptoothed grin on MAD magazine, circa 1952, sits on a magazine rack next to the soda fountain where sparkling ice cream dishes and malt glasses beckon customers tor a scoop of chocolate. On his property off of FM 306, David Hartmann has created a museum that is a small-scale replica of the old Richter’s Pharmacy. R.B. Richter founded Richter's Pharmacy in 1901. In 1910, the business moved into the building at 142 West San Antonio Street. That pharmacy is where Hartmann grew up, where he learned many of life’s lessons and where he came to cherish New Braunfels and its heritage. On the sad day in 1971 when R.B. Richter’s son, A.R Richter, died, tile store was sold and moved. Hartmann dedicated himself to making sure the pharmacy maintains a place in New Braunfels history. “When I retired five years ago this was a barn,” Hartmann said. “I had stored everything in here for years, and people have also been very ldnd in that they have given me things back that belonged to the drugstore. I have collected pharmaceutical See PHARMACY, Page 3 Hartmann’s homage Replica of Richter’s Pharmacy a tribute to bygone time Story by BRANDI GRISSOM Photos by DAVID INGRAM (Top) David Hartmann points out some of the artifacts on display in his museum dedicated to Richter's Pharmacy, where he worked at age 13. Could underground tunnels have helped hide hooch? MANDY REARY/Herald-Zeitung Old liquor bottles were unearthed recently underneath the old Richter's Pharmacy building, along with a bar sign and mysterious brick archways. By Brandi Grissom Staff Writer In the dark, dingy basement of the old Richter's Pharmacy building are two floor-to-ceil-ing archways covered over by brick. The old Seekatz Opera House basement has similar archways. And underneath Henne Hardware are two more bricked-over archways. What exists beyond the brick is a subject of speculation and debate among New Braunfels historians and longtime residents. They are entryways to tunnels used to transport alcohol during Prohibition, some say. Hogwash, others say; the archways are simply hallways that used to connect adjoining buildings. Yet another HELP RESOLVE THE TUNNEL DEBATE lf you have any information about tunnels in New Braunfels, call or write to the HerakFZeitung: B 707 Landa Street, New Braunfels. 78130 B (830) 625-9144 opinion is they were vents to let air into hot, musty basements during muggy Texas summers. No one seems to know just what lies behind the mysterious arches. In 1998, Ron Snider and Darrell Sollberger bought the old Richter Building at 142 West San Antonio and the old Seekatz Opera House a few blocks down the street. Underneath the old pharmacy, they found old bottles, a sign over a freight shaft—Goat’s Breath Bar— and the archways. “These were all connected,” Snider said of the basements downtown, pointing to the archways he said he believes are entrances to tunnels used to get illegal hooch from basement to basement in the 1920s. “‘They partied down here.” Paul Martinka at Henne Hardware said he also heard rumors of bootleggers using underground pathways in New Braunfels. “The tunnels were all connected during the Prohibition,” Martinka said. “That's how they got the alcohol from one place to another.” David Hartmann and his family See TUNNELS Page 3 PAC rallies to oppose Valentine’s petitions By Scott Mahon Staff Writer Organizers of a new political action committee have charged District 6 Councilman Ken Valentine with using a populist tax freeze movement to bolster his own petition drives. New Braunfels City Council has set a Nov. 2 election on the Proposition 13 tax initiative. Supporters are busy gathering the 1,169 signatures of registered voters required to call the city election. They also are gathering the more than 2,700 signatures required to force Comal County to hold a similar vote. Valentine, who has said he supported Proposition 13, which freezes property taxes for senior citizens, has spearheaded petitions to ban aluminum cans on the Comal River, to designate the Comal County Fairgrounds a city park and to make the convention and visitors bureau a city department. But Ray Schoch, who helped organize Citizens for Community Improvements, said Valentine and his supporters were “trying to hide behind Proposition 13 supporters.” “We’re not against or for Proposition 13," said Schoch, who is a former city councilman and current member of the Greater New Braujifels Chamber of Com merce. “But (Valentines petitions) aren’t good for the city, and they have a lot of untruths in them.” “They’re taking advantage of Proposition 13 supporters,” said Brad Wuest, a PAC organizer and also a member of the chamber. “But more important, we’re concerned that (Valentine’s) petitions weren’t a good idea.” Valentine said the criticism was unfounded. See PETITIONS. Page 3 Ken Valentine I co 3 ING I SU >AY Accent . on change ll •y a (r * J Downtown New Braunfels home furnishings business Accent* broad ens IU scope to offer interior design services as well ;