New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 14, 2004 : Front Page

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung January 14, 2004

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 14, 2004, New Braunfels, Texas WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 21 JNG A FATHER'S ROLE Dads of home-schooled children discuss how to be more active in education while still providing for the family. Page IB FORUM MOLLY IVINS President Bush's immigration plan is really nothing more than just a guest worker program. Page BJI Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. Vol. 153. No. 53 14 pages, 2 sections click SOO of rain High Low I 68 42 1,111 1 i Details .... 2B WWW. herald-zeitung.com DEAR ABBY 4B CLASSIFIEDS 6-8B COMICS 3B CROSSWORD 3B FORUM 4A OBITUARIES 3A SPORTS 5-6A TV GRIDS 4B * *    *mmmmi whew miimwhmi 1i ' im J u—a s wmfmmmmmmmmMmmmmmMMmmHarassment claims leveled at Bradberry By Ron Maloney Staff Writer KELLER — The former New Braunfels superintendent who was at the center of an open records controversy this past fall resigned his post amidst sexual harassment allegations. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported Charles Bradberry, 58, NBISD superintendent from 1983 to 1997, resigned his $182,547-a-year post Dec. 18. Friday was his last day on the job, although he will be carried on the district’s rolls as an employee until May 31. Keller ISD bought out Brad-berrys contract for $122,000 and will pay him another $92,000 in salary and benefits until his retirement date. KISD spokesman Jason Meyer said Tuesday he would not characterize Bradberry s decision to leave. “It was really something the board and Mr. Bradberry agreed upon,” Meyer said. The KISD board appointed a member to head the search for Brad-berry’s replacement Monday night. Keller is located north of Fort Worth in Tarrant County. In November, Bradberry was placed on paid administrative leave while county officials investigated an allegation that the district with held information requested by a Star-Telegram columnist in conflict with the Open Records Act. The newspaper reported that while Bradberry was on leave, four female employees told the district’s attorney Bradberry subjected them to unwanted touching, hugging or kissing. None had complained previously. KISD attorney Tom Myers did not confirm or deny the allegations. “We’re not commenting on any of the matters looked into,” Myers said. “Mr. Bradberry proposed a retirement agreement. Tile agreement was accepted by the board, and he’s retiring at the end of the year and will be replaced.” Bradberry’s contract had two-and-a-half years left. Bradberry’s attorney, Neil Adams, did not return phone calls in time for this story. DAVID INGRAM/Herald-Zeitung Comal County Sheriff s Deputy Shawn Seesengood used to patrol the streets until an accident about eight months ago nearly killed him. After a eight operations and a trying recovery, the 28-year-old is back on the job. albeit behind a desk. MIRACULOUS RECOVERY Deputy determined to get back to work after wreck almost killed him THEY SAID IF ID BEEN IN TRANSIT ANOTHER FIVE MINUTES, i’d BE DEAD. Shawn Seesengood Comal Count sheriff s deputy UPDATES V Tracking the news FATAL CAR WRECK LAST WE KNEW: Guadalupe Castelo, 48, was injured Monday in an accident on Interstate 35 in which her son, Gregory, 10, was killed. LATEST: She remained in critical condition Tuesday at University Hospital. NEXT: Watch here for updates. By Ron Maloney Staff Writer Shawn Seesengood is back at work and gets around pretty well, although he has a distinctive limp and wears a brace on his right leg. That’s pretty good considering the sheriff’s deputy was nearly killed early on the morning of May 19,2003. Seesengood, now 28, was on patrol on I M 306 a mile or so east of U.S. 281 when he stopped in the fog to help a motorist — a nurse — who had just struck part of a barbecue that was laying in the road. While he moved it, a physician COMING SATURDAY . ;s-v I Keeping score Find out how your favorite teams fared in Friday night’s soccer matches and basketball games. traveling at an estimated 55 mph struck him. Just afterward, a paramedic drove by. The three of them, together with a crew of the aeromedical rescue service, CriticalAir, kept Seesengood alive until he got to University Hospital. “T hey said if I d been in transit another five minutes, I’d be dead. I needed IO units of blood. You only have 12," Seesengood said. Getting hit by a doctor with a nurse standing by and a paramedic already en route were the first miracles Seesengood experienced in his ordeal, but they were far from the only ones. Seesengood's spleen was severed from an artery: he’d very nearly hied out. I Ie had compound fractures of both legs, eight broken ribs on his left side, a punctured lung, numerous cuts and abrasions, but no spinal injury and no brain dam-age. When he came to, on a respirator in the intensive care unit, Seesengood asked his wife, Kristi, pregnant with their youngest daughter, what had happened. She told him. “My first question was, ‘Am I going to be able to go back to work?’” he said. Two things got Seesengood See SEESENGOOD. Page 3A Minority education key to good economy Demographer: Population boom plus education decline could equal ruin By Dylan Jim6nez Staff Writer Texas educators can build a strong state economy by ensuring that minorities succeed in public education, said Steve Murdock, Texas state demographer. An increase in minority students over the next 40 years BY THE NUMBMIS I The Hispanic population in Texas grew by 2 3 million in the 1990s — more than any other state but California ■ By 2040. 96 percent of the population growth in Texas will be non-Anglo S By 2040. eight of 10 children in Texas public schools will be non-Anglo could impoverish Texas and create an unskilled workforce, Murdock told a group of local educators and officials Tuesday. The symposium was sponsored by Upstarts, a Comal County-based dropout prevention program that has served 450 children during the past three years. The answer, said Murdock and Upstarts director Karen McDonell, is to prevent minority students from slipping through the cracks of public education. By 2010, New Braunfels and CU mal County will be part of one of the largest contiguous metropolitan areas in the United States, Murdock said. As the population grows, the racial makeup is changing and impacting the economy, he said. “More important for Texas is the change in the socioeconomic makeup of Texas,’’ Murdock said. Anglo people are dying off taster than they are being born in Texas. More than (SO percent of the births in Texas are non-Anglo children, and more than 70 percent of the deaths in Texas are Anglo, Murdock said. See EDUCATION. Page 3A 4B could foot bill for tech center shortfall By Scott Mahon Staff Writer The New Braunfels Infrastructure Improvement Corporation (4B) Board of Directors will consider I hursday whether to hind a $100,(HK) shortfall for the Central'Texas Technology Center. Guadalupe (/miffy opted late last year not to participate because of budget constraints. T he center, which will cost $4 million, is scheduled to open in May and will ofter basic classes in technology training. Guadalupe County, Comal County, New Braunfels and Seguin were to participate in funding the project. However, Guadalupe County Judge Donald Schraub said last year the county never pledged funds to the project. “T he commitment, so to speak, was made the last (term) with Judge (James) Sagebiel,” Schraub said last year. “I know what was said. I was here. It was that the county has no money for tiffs project at this particular time.” Matt I larrison, 4-B board chairman, said the hoard AT A GLANCE I Infrastructure/ Improvement Corporation (4B) Board of Directors ■ 7pm Thursday I Conference Room A. Municipal Building, 424 S Caste!! Ave See LRD. Page 3A FRONTand Center ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: January 14, 2004

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