New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, November 6, 2003

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

November 06, 2003

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Issue date: Thursday, November 6, 2003

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Wednesday, November 5, 2003

Next edition: Friday, November 7, 2003

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 312,053

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - November 6, 2003, New Braunfels, Texas SATURDAYCanyon seniors mark their experiences with pep rally Canyon High School cheerleaders Kelsey Roitsch, a junior, and senior Megan Crittender perform a "chair" stance Wednesday night during CHS' pep rally. The Cougars play Del Valle Friday night in district action. REBECCA 8. ROGBtt/Herald-Zertung By Dylan Jiminez Staff Writer Under the same dark clouds that rained out the Canyon High School homecoming pep rally in September, about 150 seniors rushed the field at Cougar Stadium Wednesday night to celebrate their team, their school and their high school experience. The traditional candlelight pep rally usually is a highlight of homecoming week. I lun-dreds of candles are lighted in the stands, spelling out “Go Coogs,” And after the pep rally, the seniors meet at the middle of the field. It’s a tradition many students look forward to all four years of high school. Last month, seniors were upset and even in tears when the 15-year-old tradition was canceled at the last minute because of heavy rain. Student council organizers worried the same might happen Wednesday night. The event was rescheduled in September because of its significance, said Donna Williams, student council adviser. The small crowd of mostly seniors and their parents didn’t pack the stands like the homecoming crowds, but the seniors said they were happy student council decided to host the event for the last home game. “At least we still have one,” said senior Karen Cadena. “It's like a farewell.” *11.    FRONTand    Centersilent on    ^ leder edge of fashion By Dylan Jimtnez Staff Writer SPORTS CRUNCH TIME For the Canyon Cougars, Friday night s game against Del Valle is a make-or-break moment for their playoff bid. Page SA THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2003 ..apijarrsn. m m .iii imm mm' „ua,™u ii-''" Discount Storage is offering a $10 discount on a 10-by-10 storage unit with electricity before Dec. 31. Page 3A Zeitung Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. Vol. 152, No. 306 12 pages, 2 sections CLICK 500 herald-zeitung.com LJ W Mostly cloudy High Low 74 57 Details .... 1B DEAR ABBY 3B CLASSIFIEDS *6B COMICS 2B CROSSWORD 2B FORUM 4A APPLAUSE 4B SPORTS 5-6A TV GRIDS 3B Your Wurst move? Find out what polka dancing is ail about why people love it New Braunfels city officials will not disclose the names of two companies they plan to entice here with taxpayer dollars. Infrastructure and Improvement Corporation directors — the city’s economic development sales tax board — met last month to discuss attracting a company to bring jobs and taxable buildings to the city. City Council also met with company officials. The deal is a few months from completion and will be announced before the public process begins, City Manager Chuck Pinto said. The board meets tonight in closed session to consider incentives for another See ttROVmi. Page 3A Scooter Store probe 2 years old, FBI says By Ron Maloney Staff Writer Dressed in traditional German garb, Al Planatscher sells his wares at Wurstfest. . He has been selling traditional German- The FBI remained mum Wednesday about what, if any, wrongdoing has been . uncovered in its investigation of the Scooter Store. Special Agent Rene Salinas, spokesman for the agency's San Antonio office, did say, however, the probe has been under way for two years. Scooter Store Executive Vice President for Marketing Margaret McGuckin said company officials had Uarricnn heard no news from Doug Harrison CEO Doug Harrison has offered to meet with investigators, buUso far-hasn’t been asked. The investigation of the Scooter Store coincides with an industry wide crackdown See BCOOTBR, Page 3A Wurstfest wardrobe sans knee socks is incomplete By Bill Ervin Correspondent style apparel for 11 years. Above, right, Megan Van Nod, 9, and her brother Kirk. 8. show off their Wurstfest outfits. Bill Lohr, a retired Louisiana State Police captain, has attended Wurstfest since 1987 and has invested more than - $600 in traditional German clothing, which he sports during his weeklong celebration. “It’s getting into the program,” Lohr said. Lohr isn’t alone. Men and women wearing costumes that reflect New Braunfels’ Ger-. man heritage are a common sight during Wurstfest. The Wurstfest Association’s opas and most male members of the “oompah” bands that perform constantly during Wurstfest usually are seen clad in lederhosen and other “traditional German” attire commonly associated with the sausage celebration. The women usually wear the “dirndl,” a dress highlighted with brighdy colored accessories. Lederhosen are pants, or shorts, made from leather. Leder means leather, and hosen are pants. German costumes were rare during the event’s early days. “I recognized the need to exploit our German heritage,’’ said Tom Purdum. Purdum, who led the WURSTFEST ■ TODAY: Gates open at 5 pm.; close at 12 a m. ■ Admission is $8 Children 12 and under get in free CLICK Official site:    _ www.wurstfest .com LICK 6 Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce when he came here in 1961, has been involved with the celebration since its inauguration that year. He served on the planning committee under organizer Ed Grist. “Everybody thought short pants and suspenders was German,” Purdum said. “So, starting the first year, we wore Bermuda shorts. Beth Grist made us some ties. “We found out later on about lederhosen and started wearing them with white shirts and ties and Tyrolean hats,” he said. The mens Wurstfest costume now includes specially designed vests. While associated with Germany, lederhosen probably originated in Bavaria. They also can be found in Austria and Switzerland. Lederhosen have features that distinguish them from other leather shorts. They can include a drop front with either a button or zipper fastening; elaborately decorated straps — suspenders — with a crossbar in front; cuffed legs with lacing on the bottom; large buttons attached with a leather See ATTMB. Page 3A ;

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