New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 25, 2003

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

October 25, 2003

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Issue date: Saturday, October 25, 2003

Pages available: 28

Previous edition: Friday, October 24, 2003

Next edition: Sunday, October 26, 2003

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - October 25, 2003, New Braunfels, Texas SATURDAY, O '!DC 780 n’HjJmril' "WISKUS ™mi.    DK X /99nx 'Z1'""11'"!,!! IT? I* wii SITUNG SPORTS BEAR CLAWED! Undefeated Canyon Cougars suffer first defeat of season, 31-24, at the hands of the Bastrop Bears. Page SA DON'T FORGET TIME CHANGE Daylight Savings Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday morning. Set your clocks back one hour when you go to bed tonight. I Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852. Vol. 152, No. 296 14 pages, 2 sections CL herald-zeitung.com soc P * PHH ar ^Mostly m cloudy High Low 78 51 Details .... 1B DEAR ABBY 3B CLASSIFIEDS 5-8B COMICS 2B CROSSWORD 2B FORUM    4A RELIGION 4B SPORTS 5A TV GRIDS 3B Ranger: Buyer offered trial lies DPS gave Ulloa $3,000 for deal By Ron Maloney Staff Writer A Texas Ranger testified Friday that a man who allegedly bought marijuana from a drug defendant tried to extort $10,000 from him in exchange for lying in court. 1116 testimony came in the fifth day of the trial of Terry Ulloa, which continues Monday in the courtroom of 274th Judicial District Judge Clary Steel. Because of the nature of the charges and his past record, which includes a federal drug conviction, Ulloa, 45, faces up to two life terms in prison if convicted on charges of possession of marijuana. methamphetamine and cocaine in a drug free zone. Ulloa was arrested July 13, 2000, in his West End home after Djstnc, A, an investigation by the Djb Waldr| Comal County Metropolitan Narcotics Task Force and I bailment of Public Safety Narcotics Service. His arrest came after former Comal County Sheriff s Detective Pete Arroyo led Robert Ortiz Sr. to make a series of alleged marijuana purchases. Friday, Texas Ranger Ll. Tony heal testified under questioning by District Attorney Dib Waldrip that he investigated Ortiz for witness tampering. That investigation came a year after Ulloa’s arrest when Ulloa, free on bail, reported to officials that Ortiz had approached him and offered to lie in court about the drug<ransactions. Leal, who headed die investigation into the alleged extortion, had Ulloa wear a listening device on Aug. 17,2001, anti engage Ortiz in a conversation about the offer, which was taped by the 1)I*S. The conversation was later transcribed for court. Ulloa was given $3,000 in cash by the DPS to make the deal. “Mr. Ortiz said, ‘I’m going to jail already. There’s nothing I can do about that, ” Leal testified. Ortiz prepared an elaborate lie involving an alleged illegal immigrant he said See ULLOA. Page 3A growth By Ron Maloney Staff Writer SMITHSON VALLEY — Comal County Engineer Tom I lornseth said Thursday night the county’s growth is not “in crisis,’’ but warned the county needs more authority to act as the area grows dramatically in the coming years. Homseth was among officials on hand as the League of Women Vot-ers-Comal Area kicked off a two-year study of growth and land use issues with a panel discussion dubbed “County in Crisis.”    l    surer Susan Patterson. Hornseth opened his    Homseth,    New    Braun- remarks with a swipe at    Hr *.    fels City Planner Frank the name of the meeting.    Robbins, former New I would have to dis-    Braunfels Parks Director agree,” he said. "I think    Hfefcp    Iris Neffendorf and plan we’re well-organized. I    ner Donald Stence all don’t think the county is    BHBNjPH    gave 20-minute present in crisis.’ I think a better    m    dons followed by a ques- term would be‘County in ■ mr—tion-and-answer period, the crosshairs.”'    Tom    Hornseth    Hornseth    over    the    last About 25 people attended the three years has helped shape the meeting, including County Judge Danny Scheel, Precinct 2 Commissioner Jay Minikin and Trea- county’s water availability, drainage, on-site sewage and subdivision regulations. He is working now on a major thoroughfare plan for the county. County officials have said the county could be a target for outsiders who wish to poach its groundwater supply. It s also a tar get, I lornseth said, because people want to move here. Hornseth laid out the county ’s limited authority to regulate growth and where it comes from in the local government and water codes. The county has lobbied the See CRISIS. Page 3A Greg's Automotive We repair them all w ' t, < t'"' •’ Us e and Truck Center Classic, Current, -■■re —.................................^—--- 1983 679 S. Seguin 625-6824 2003 Custom MHHMNMMMMMBi Council to mull traffic study FRONTand Center By Dylan JimAnez Staff Writer New Braunfels City Council could take a step toward managing the summer traffic influx Monday when it considers hiring a consultant to develop a traffic plan. Council meets at 6:30 p.m. in Council Chambers at the New Braunfels Municipal Building, 424 S. Castell Aye. The New Braunfels Police Department doesn’t have a traffic division and doesn’t spend too much time ushering the tens of thousands of summer recreation visitors, said NBPD Chief Russell Johnson. "There’s not much you can do,” Johnson said. Much of the traffic 9n Interstate 35, Seguin Avenue and Loop 337 is bumper to bumper throughout the summer. Johnson said the problem was mostly volume. "If we look at a major holiday during the summer, our towft 'can double in size,” Johnson said. "The streets in this town were never designed to handle that much traffic.” The police department has considered several suggestions, including making traffic on some two-way streets go one way in the morning and go another way in the afternoon. This summer was a busy time with ideal water conditions on the Comal and Guadalupe rivers. Traffic, though, left something to be desired. “There was a widespread concern that traffic was worse this summer,” said Sherrie trammel, Schlitterbahn public information officer. Although traffic is heavy on weekends on certain roadways, residents often complain they can’t get around town, and businesses complain customers can’t get to them. Mayor Adam Cork would like to see the interested parties try to work on the problem together, he said. City officials, businesspeople and the Texas Department of Transportation might be able to develop a solution without spending money on a consultant, Cork said. Photos by REBECCA S. ROGERS/Herald-Zeitung Geno Medina and son Enzo get hands-on instruction on at the city's hunter-safety course Thursday night. State gun safety from hunter-safety instructor Nathan Pence law says hunters older than 17 must take the course. Hunters loaded for safety By Dylan Jimdnez Staff Writer David J. Laguna, 17, has been hunting for seven years. He killed his first white-tailed deer two years ago. But David J. had to stay home from his father’s hunting trip last month: He had turned 17 and had to have a hunter-training course to receive his license. Laguna and his dad, also David Laguna, joined about 20 people this week in a hunter education course hosted by the New Braunfels Parks and Recreation Department. Steve Lightfoot, an information specialist for Texas Parks & Wildlife, said every hunter bom on or after Sept. 2,1971, must take a hunter safety class. David J. is ready now, though, and he and his father hope to hit the ground running when deer season opens Nov. 1. For the Lagunas, hunting is a family sport. David J. and his father hunt all over. They hunt doves in the Valley, and other game on ranches nearby or on their property in Del Rio. Last year they collected 350 pounds of deer meat. David Laguna takes his 8-year-old daughter hunting although she isn’t allowed to hunt herself. “My boys always liked it,” Laguna said. “But she’s been asking to shoot it.” Children under 17 need not take the course if they hunt with a licensed hunter 17 or older, Lightfoot said. Traditional hunter safety courses consist of IO hours SAFETY TIPS ■ Treat every firearm as though it were loaded. ■ Always point the muzzle in a safe direction. ■ Be sure of your target and what is in front of and beyond it ■Unload firearms when they are * I not in use. ■ Wear hearing and I eye protection. ■ Don't handle firearms while intoxicated. SCUia few* Parks ft W*Me j of classroom time. Hunters seeking a license can study at home via the Internet and attend a four-hour hands-on home study and skills trail test, according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife. The tests are available in San Antonio and Austin in December. More information is available at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/edu/hunted/. This year, hunters younger than 17 can take advantage of youth-only hunting this weekend. Saturday and Sunday, minors can take white-tailed deer or turkey, Lightfoot said. “It’s just to give young and inexperienced hunters the first chance at game,” he said. It gets more difficult to hunt deer as the season goes on because of fewer daylight hours and because deer get wise to hunters on public land, he said. Enzo and Gino look through hunter safety handbooks. COMING SUNDAY In the fast Jane Automania owner Marty Boccia dealt in care of the extreme. At hie dealership, ‘money does buy happiness* t ;

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