New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 8, 2003, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

October 08, 2003

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Issue date: Wednesday, October 8, 2003

Pages available: 32

Previous edition: Tuesday, October 7, 2003

Next edition: Thursday, October 9, 2003

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - October 8, 2003, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4A — Herald-Zeitung — Wednesday, October 8, 2003 Our Opinion Traffic issues of future demand attention today County officials must plan for future highway needs with the same kind of effort being put forth to establish regulations for other growth areas like subdivisions, water, drainage and sewage. C omal County commissioners got their first look at a major thoroughfare plan. This first draft sets out right-of-way widths for state and county roads. County Engineer Tom I lornseth said the plan is only the beginning — a starting place for work that should be done to plan for the future. I lornseth is right. After this plan is adopted, the county needs to plan for its future highway needs. It needs to put the same kind of effort into planning for future thoroughfares it brought to its subdivision rules, water availability rules, drainage rules and on-site sewage facility regulations. Anyone who drives into New Braunfels on Texas 46 each morning, or who crosses U.S. 281 on the same road, knows the county already has serious traffic concerns. The county’s population is expected to grow to more than 250,000 by 2050. With it, our traffic issues will certainly grow exponentially as well. Comal County government prides itself on being proactive. It needs to plan for future roads and it needs the support of its citizens as it does so. Roads are easier to build when they happen on empty land preserved in advance. The people who weathered public scorn to plan for and build that boondoggle now known as Loop 1604 look a lot smarter today than they did 35 years ago. Today in History By The Associated Press Today is Wednesday. Oct. 8, the 281st day of 2003. There are 84 days left in the year. Today’s I lighlight in I listory: On Oct. 8,1871, the Great Chicago Fire erupted while another deadly blaze broke out in Peshtigo, Wis. On this date: In 1869, the 14th president of the United States, Franklin Fierce, died in Concord, NJ I. In 1890, American aviation hero Eddie Ricken-backer was born in Columbus, Ohio. In 1918, Sgt. Alvin C. York almost single-handedly killed 25 German soldiers and captured 132 in the Argonne Forest in France. In 1934, Bruno I iauptmann was indicted for murder in the death of the infant son of Charles A. Iindhergh. In 1945, President Truman announced that the secret of the atomic bomb would be shared only with Britain and Canada. In 1956, Don Dirsen pitched the only perfect game in a World Series to date as the New York Yankees heat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 2-0. In 1970, Soviet author Alexander Solzhenitsyn was named winner of the Nobel Prize for literature. In 1982, all labor organizations in Poland, including Solidarity, were banned. In 1985, the hijackers of the Italian cruise ship Achille Ixiuro killed American passenger Leon Klinghoffer. Herald-Zeitung Serving New Braunfels and C&nitil County since 1852. New Braunfels Zeitunt) was founded 1852; New Braunfels Herald was founded 1890. The two papers merged in 1957and printed in both German and English until 1958 Managing Editor Gary E. Maitland News Editor Brady Creel Features Editor Brian Grant Editor and Publisher Doug Toney Circulation Director Craig Pauling Advertising Director Courtney Abernathy Business Manager Heather Grant rn y i ii i I If Dean wins Denis’ nomination, Establishment types will be sick Several times Eve heard television journalists complain that Howard Dean has to learn to control his temper. Actually, it is his temper that I find attractive. An honest man with sincere convictions will get angry when he hears lies. Some of our greatest presidents had ferocious tempers. George Washington, Andy jackson and Harry Truman are three examples. You don’t see other can didates getting angry because they are all phonies. Their so-called convictions are just campaign positions manufactured by their staffs. They don’t really believe in anything except getting elected, so they really don’t care what is said. They are like trial lawyers. They are interested only in scoring points and winning. Theres nothing personal, and the truth simply doesn’t matter. Whether you agree with him or not, Howard Dean actually believes in his convictions. He is a genuine man. An honest, genuine man will not suffer fools lightly, nor will he stand around like a dummy with a phony smile on his face while he hears himself lied about. I probably would not agree with Dr. Dean on all of his positions, but I certainly trust him, if he is elected, to do what he honestly believes is in the best interest of the country. That’s more than I can say for any of the other candidates. It s this quality of being real and genuine that I think has attracted hundreds of thousands of people to his campaign. What people see is an intelligent man who isn t catering to the press, who isn't resorting to weasel words. This could be, and I pray it is, the CHARLEYMKSE Charley Reese is a columnist for King Features Synicate. You can write to him at PO. Box 2446. Orlando. Flu. 32802. start of a sea change in American politics. It could be that after so many disappointments, Americans are finally wising up to the professional politicians whose statements are manufactured for campaign purposes only. 1 Some journalists have put out the silly idea that Gen. Wesley Clark’s candidacy is just a stalking horse for Hillary Clinton. I don’t believe that for one minute. Mrs. Clinton has said she is not running, and I believe her. After all, she had some bad experiences with her husband in the White House. I don’t think she’d like to drag him back into it. I’ll believe^he’s going to run for president when she files for divorce. The general is just an insurance policy for the Establishment. Yes, Virginia, there is an Establishment, and the game it has played all of my life is to make sure that both the Democratic nominee and the Republican nominee were controllable by the Establishment. What the Establishment fears most is an independent outsider. The Establishment isn’t concerned with conservatives or liberals, with the left or with the right. These are all just red herrings to keep the populace distracted. Politics in our country is about money and power. End of story. I predict that if Howard Dean wins the nomination, Establishment types will be throwing up all around the Ivy League. LBTTMS POLICY ■ Letters must be 250 words or fewer. ■ The Herald-Zeitung reserves the right to edit all submissions. ■ Guest columns should be less than 500 words and must be accompanied by a photo.    * ■ Address and telephone number must be included so authorship can be confirmed. PRESIDENT ■ George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Washington, D.C. 20500 SENATE ■ Kay Bailey Hutchison Russell Senate Office Building Room 284 Washington, DC. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-5922 Fox: (202) 224-0776 Web: http://hutchison.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.) SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 8023 Vantage Drive, Suite 460 San Antonio 78230 Telephone: (210) 340-2885 Fox: (210) 349-6753 ■ John Cornyn Russell Senate Courtyard 5 Washington, D.C. 20510 Telephone: (202) 224-2934 Fox: (202) 228-2856 Web: http://cornyn.senate.gov/ (Send e-mails through Web site.)' AUSTIN OFFICE: 221 West Sixth St., Suite 1530 Austin 78701 Telephone: (512) 469-6034 Fox: (512) 469-6020 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 600 Navarro, Suite 210 San Antonio 78205 Telephone: (210) 224-7485 Fax: (210) 224-8569 CONGRESSMAN ■ Lamar Smith Rayburn House Office Building Room 2231 Washington, DC. 20515 Telephone: (202) 225-4236 Fax: (202) 225-8628 Mail letters to: Letters to Editor c/o Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, TX 78131 1328 Fax them to: (830) 606-3413 e-mail them to: news@herald- zeitung.com , GOVERNOR ■ Rick Perry State Capitol, Room 2S.1 P.O. Box 12428 Austin 78711 Telephone: (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 STATE HOUSE ■ Carter Casteel 254 E. Mill St. New Braunfels 78130 Telephone: (830) 627-0215 Toll Free: (866) 687-4961 Fax: (830) 627-8895 WHILE IN AUSTIN: PO. Box 2910 Austin 78768-2190 Telephone: (512) 463-0325 Fax: (512) 473-9920 E-mail address: [email protected] STATS SENATE ■ Jeff Wentworth 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 720 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 826-7800 Fax: (210) 826-0571 WHILE IN AUSTIN: Telephone: (512) 463-0125 Fax: (512) 463-7794 E-mail address: [email protected] state.tx.us ■ Judith Zaffirini PO Box 627 Laredo 78042-0627 SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: 12702 Toepperwein Road *214 San Antonio 78233 Telephone: (210) 657-0095Liberals celebrating Limbaugh’s on-air, off-air problems CALTHOMAS Cal Thomas is a columnist for Tribune Media Services International. He hosts 'After Hours "on Fox News Channel Saturdays at ll p.m. FST Direct all mail for Cal Thomas to: Tribune Media Services, 435 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 15(H), Chicago. 6(H)11. Readers may also leave e-mail at www.calthomas.com. Liberals had a good week last week, not because they won any arguments, but because they think two conservatives suffered damage to their credibility. A lot of liberals think their relent-\ less and over-the-top invective J against President Bush is starting ^1 to pay off because his formerly ’ high approval ratings have declined. They think they have him hooked into a potential political scandal because someone in government leaked the name of a covert (JA employee. I lowever, they will be kicking themselves next year at election time when it will be proved, once again, how dangerous it is to underestimate George W. Bush. Their other “victory’” was the tabloid outing of radio talk show king Rush lim-haugh. The National Enquirer published a story that cited a former worker in the Iim-baugh household alleging that Limbaugh has abused prescription painkillers. Although Limbaugh has not been charged with any offense, he has hired a top criminal defense attorney, Roy Black, who defended William Kennedy Smith against rape charges, a case Limbaugh regularly lampooned on his radio show. Liberals have been frustrated that their ideological domination of the media has declined, largely because of Limbaugh and now l ox News Channel (where I have a weekly show). Knocking him off the air would launch a thousand celebrations from Manhattan’s Upper East Side to Beverly I fills and Malibu. What happened after Limbaugh said on ESPN that Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb gets a break f rom the media because he is black, and they and the National Football league want a black quarterback to succeed, amounted to censorship. It also reflects the prevailing double standard about race and racial conversation. Instead of sacking limbaugh (he “resigned”), ESPN should have brought in someone the following week to debate him. Not only would ratings have set a record (the network’s stated intention for hiring limbaugh), ESPN would be demonstrating the highest principles of pluralism, tolerance and ideological diversity. Black politicians can say virtually anything about whites (such as equating President Bush arid Republi cans with the Taliban and “canines," as NAACP Chairman Julian Bond did in July, 2001) and suffer no political or personal consequences. Whites are limited in what they can say about blacks. ESPN bowed to political correctness that says any perceived criticism of an African-American by a white person is, by definition, racist. We’ve seen this before. In an effort to promote policies even many blacks oppose, black “leaders" are quick to tar anyone with the “racist” label should they fail to toe the liberal fine. Many blacks in the 1970s opposed busing to achieve arbitrary racial “balance” because it meant sending their children out of the neighborhood over long distances. That the white politicians who supported busing could afford to send their children to private schools didn’t matter, because their intentions were “noble.” If you were white and opposed busing, you were branded a racist and silenced by the charge alone. Whether busing was good social policy (as it proved not to be) could not be debated at the time. When limbaugh emerged on the national scene, he provided a forum in which such ideas could not only be debated but certain liberal doctrines ridiculed. Conservative blacks frequently call the show and are treated with respect and admiration by limbaugh. The callers tell him they oppose the politics of the liberal black establishment. Rarely are such voices heard in the mainstream media, whose guest bookers always seem to call the same people, such as jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. I have listened to Rush Limbaugh for IO years. He doesn’t tell me what to think. He simply expresses what I and millions of Americans already believe. Limbaugh reflects views conservatives held before he came along. I Ie has won their allegiance because he respects their ideas, unlike the mainstream media. And he is funny. He is also shy and, yes, humble. Anyone who regularly listens to the show knows of his gratitude for the success he has enjoyed. He worked hard to gain it. If he erred in judgment about prescription pain pills, that does not dilute (as so many liberals wish it would) the power of his arguments. Just as soon as he is legally able, Limbaugh should come clean about whether or not he has a drug problem. If he does, he should admit it and seek help. That's often difficult for one at the top of his profession, but confession, healing and restoration are more satisfying than silence and a high-priced lawyer. 1100 NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio 78209 Telephone: (210) 821-5024 Fax: (210) 821-5947 ................ft...................... how to Texas Government SAN ANTONIO OFFICE: ;

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