New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, September 21, 2001 : Front Page

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung September 21, 2001

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - September 21, 2001, New Braunfels, Texas New BraunfelsHerald-Zm cMiv^y 26Z1 t W* iqw%- ptffl ^_ FRIDAY ^ptember 21, 2001 20 pages in 2 sections NG '    '    to Vol. 150, No. 269 Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852 50 cents iFreedom, fear go to war f Bush delivers ultimatum to Taliban in national address K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Late-night exercisers at McKenna Sports and Rehabilitation Center watch as President Bush delivers his call to the Taliban and other governments siding with terrorism to turn over those responsible for the Sept. 11 attacks. “Whether we bring justice to our enemies or our enemies to justice,” Bush said, “justice will be done.” By Sandra SobierajAssociated Press Writer WASHINGTON — President Bush cautioned a shaken nation Thursday that there are “struggles ahead and dangers to face” as America and its allies combat global terrorism. He announced a new Cabinet-level office to fortify homeland defenses. Addressing a joint session of Congress nine days after suicide hijackers are believed to have killed more than 6,000 people at the Pentagon and World Trade Center, Bush clasped the badge of a slain policeman in his fist. “I will not forget this wound to our country, or those who inflicted it. I will not yield. I will not rest,” he said. The Sept. ll attacks had put the United States on notice that the world’s only superpower was not immune to attack, Bush said. He named Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge to head the new Office of Homeland Security. Ridge, a Republican, will resign Oct. 5, and will be replaced by Lt. Gov. Mark Schweiker. Using forceful terms, Bush delivered a verbal indictment against Osama bin Laden and demanded that Afghanistan’s ruling Taliban militia surrender the suspected terrorist, release imprisoned Americans and give the United States full access to terrorist training camps. These demands are not open to discussion, Bush said. “They will hand over the terrorists or they will share in their fate.” The commander in chief directed U.S. military forces to “be ready” for the gathering war: “The hour is coming when America will act and you will make us proud.” Bush asked every nation to take part, by contributing police forces, intelligence services and banking information.See ULTIMATUM/5A File photo President Bush addressed a joint session of Congress Thursday night, demanding Afghanistan’s Taliban surrender Osama bin Laden to the United States.Major Developments  Recruiters say interest in enlisting up ■ FBI Director Robert Mueller said Thursday the identities of several of the suicide hijackers are in doubt as investigators arrested a man in Illinois wanted for questioning in this past week’s terror attacks. ■ As investigators followed the money trail, a bank in Florida said it found accounts connected to people involved in the attacks. ■ In Chicago, the FBI arrested a man with tile sane name as a man with ties to a jailed associate of suspected terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden. The FBI said it was trying to determine if the man in custody is the same person. ■ The FBI asked the nation's water companies to increase security at their facflities. ■ Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said Thursday the already weak economy took a significant blow from the worst terrorist attacks in U.S. history. Greenspan said he was concerned that new tax cuts or increased spending could actually hurt the economy if financial markets pushed interest rates higher over worries the government was returning to big budget deficits. ■ New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani sharply revised the number of missing and presumed dead upward — to 6,333 — at tile World Trade Center twin towers, destroyed by the impact of hijacked jetliners. An additional 189 are believed dead from a similar attack on the Pentagon, and 44 more perished when a fourth hijacked plane crashed in Pennsylvania. ■ The U.S. is pouring military firepower into the Persian Gulf to preparation for the war on terrorism. The Air Force is sending B-52 and B-1 bombers and fighter jets while mobilizing thousands of reservists, and the Army is readying its commando forces. im TI ie rn Residents weigh in on nation’s next stepBy Brett Bousman Herald-Zeitung Correspondent Area residents have different opinions about the approach America should take to the terrorist attacks on Sept. ll. “I feel Eke we are definitely going to war. We are truly the only country that can unite the world against terrorism,” said Martha, who asked that her last name not be published. The public does not need to know about everything the military plans to do, she said. “My son is in the Marines. I don’t want any unnecessary information to get out that could harm him,” she said, ‘It’s time for citizens to trust their leaders to do the right thing. If the public knows the military’s plans, what is stopping the ‘bad guys’ from getting a hold of these plans?” Bruce Tyler, a government In a crowded office at his business, Ashraf Khan says he prays five times a day to Allah. Khan was to be the best man in his brother’s wedding today, but he says the pilot of the Delta Airlines plane he was taking from San Antonio to Dallas asked him to leave because of his appearance. K. JESSIE SLATEN/ Herald-Zeitung instructor from San Antonio College, said he did not necessarily object to getting militarily involved. However, he said common sense and diplomacy were more important. “If we could focus on finding the perpetrators instead of an entire nation, we could probably achieve our purpose,” Tyler said. “Right now all we can do is hire intelligent people.” This is a time for the United States to examine itself and see how it is conducting itself with the rest of the world, he said. “We need to try and understand the motive behind the terrorist attacks and why certain nations would dislike us,” he said. Afghanistan possibly turned on the United States because of its abandonment of support after the Cold War, See NEXT STE P/5 A K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung David Retano, Rashelle Rodriguez and Raquel Pulido talk with Recruiter-in-Charge FCI Frank D. Sudderth Jr., USN outside the Navy recruiting office Thursday afternoon. Retano ships out today, while Rodriguez and Pulido have several weeks before they leave for boot camp. All three say current events are only making them more anxious to begin their tours of duty. By Amy ClarksonStaff Writer People of all ages want to answer America’s call to arms, say recruiters from the New Braunfels area. High school students, military veterans and average Americans want to feel a part of the solution in the war against terrorism. In the days after the attack on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, local Army, Navy and Air Force recruiting stations experienced an increase in the number of people who expressed an interest in joining the military. Terrorists struck the World Trade Center and Pentagon in hijacked airplanes Sept. ll. In the wake of those attacks, President Bush threatened military action and deployed aircraft to the Persian Gulf region today. Most recruiters say that it’s too soon to tell if those inquiries will turn into an actual increase in the number of soldiers, sailors and airmen. The Army’s Fifth Recruiting Brigade is located in San Antonio. Spokesperson Cheri Avigne said that recruiters in their eight-state region, which includes Texas, report mixed responses to this past week’s attacks. “In some areas, we’ve been really busy,” she said. “In others, we haven’t seen an increase. It just depends.” Avigne, who is the brigade’s chief of advertising and public affairs, said in the days after the attacks, recruiting commands around the country were busy — but not always talking to prospective recruits. “A few days after the attacks we had some veterans come in and offer to sign up again,” she said. “Many of them were from World War II. They also talked to family members and other people. I think people just needed someplace to go to find answers. So they went to their local Army recruiting command.” In the local area, the Army received more phone calls and visits, but that hasn’t translated into moreSee RECRUITERS/5A Man claims he was target of pilot’s prejudice By Ron Maloney Staff Writer Five times a day, the owner of the Cingular Wireless store in New Braunfels stops what he is doing to pray. When he’s at work, Ashraf Khan locks the front door and prays in the back, much as he’s done since he came from Pakistan more than a decade ago. Islam is a peaceful religion that teaches love, not hatred, he said. Khan said Muslims who thought they have a religious justification for hijacking an airliner and flying it into the World TVade Center and killing thousands were just as twisted as a Chris tian who thought it was OK to blow up a federal building in Oklahoma. “Ours is a peaceful religion. We are not taught to kill each other,” he said. Monday night, Khan got a lesson in stereotypes and religious and ethnic prejudice in San Antonio. That lesson came on a Delta airliner when Khan, a resident alien who will become a naturalized U.S. citizen in two months, was headed home for his brother’s wedding. When Mehboob Khan gets married today, his brother Ashraf won’t be there. He said he was kicked off the plane because of his appearance. See PREJUDICE/5A Inside Abby.................. .............7A Classifieds............. ..........5-1 OB Comics................ ..............9A Crossword.......... .............7A Forum.................. ..............6A Local/Metro......... ..............4A Movies.................. ...............7A Obituaries............ ..............3A Sports................. ..........1-4B Today................... ..............2A www.herakLzeltung.coni Key Code 76 ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: September 21, 2001

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