New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 19, 2001 : Front Page

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung August 19, 2001

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 19, 2001, New Braunfels, Texas American Profile Trains getting back on track/lnside LEISURE this Week To market, to market to find a great deal/lnside New Braunfels Lifestyle Positive attitude fights homework blues/1 C SUNDAY August 19, 2001 50 pages in 5 sections hmm    50    pages    in    5    sec    ti    ( Herald-Zeitung ti ....... ■ ■ : :.............-......""T.................' " . ............. ■.........................-..... fc-.......... • ■—------ ---------- ----- ... -............................... -. ...... ....... ........ ........... ....................... ........... .......A....... , i. i m 111 m 11 IMI, i mr, rn Vol. 150 No. 241 Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852 $1.00 Annexation2001 ■ Targeted area: New Braunfels planned to add 5.15 square miles to the city’s current 30.2 square miles. Council voted Monday to remove 3.45 square miles from the original proposal. Up to two more square miles might be removed on Aug. 27. ■ How many homes affected: 784 homes ■ How many people: 2,186 '■ Current New Braunfels population: about 38,000 (U.S. Census report) * ■ Remaining steps: Second reading of the ordinance: Aug. 27; third reading, which sets the effective date: Sept. 10. ■ Home rule: New Braunfels is a home-rule city. In terms of annexation, that means the city can fix its borders, extend its borders, annex areas adjacent to its borders and exchange area with other municipalities. Other types of city governments do not allow annexation without the permission of the residents. K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Jimmy Quinn and his wife Tina are worried about plans to annex property lying on one side of their main road. ‘This is a mess,” Quinn said, lf annexation passes, one half of Schmucks road will belong to the county, and one half to the city, he adds. “What’s going to happen when we call the police? What happens if the city shows up for our neighbors across the street? Are they just going to say sorry, we can’t help you and leave?” Council’s redrawing the lines, but city hall cannot tell taxpayers how much it will cost By Amy Clarkson and Ron Maloney * Staff Writers The signs at either end of the country road behind the new Roam Open Air Market variously call it Schmucks Lane and Schmucks Road. In the middle, in the little gray house on an acre of land, live Jimmy and Tina Quinn, their son Brett, his pet ferret, a few chickens and three “very useless” — but loveable — dogs. The home where the Quinns have lived for nearly 15 years is right at the edge of an area the city intends to annex. All Jimmy Quinn sees coming to his family from annexation is a way for the City of New Braunfels to reach into his wallet and take what tax money it can on his modest home. “It’s going to increase my taxes for sure, and according to what they’ve told us at the meetings, they’re not going to provide us any services,” Quinn said. Where the Quinns live, they get fire protection provided by the New Braunfels Fire Department under a deal with the county. New Braunfels Utilities provides water. Like their neighbors, they have a septic system that works just fine. Sheriff’s deputies provide their law enforcement. Tina Quinn grew up in New Braunfels, and she likes living outside of town. She doesn’t want to see that change. “I ask people why you came here and they say ifs because New Braunfels is such a neat little town. If it’s a neat little town, why do they want it to grow?” she said. The reason “they'’ — the city — seem to want New Braunfels to grow is because the city accepts that it is a foregone conclusion that it must. Councilman Larry Alexander, a former member of the planning commission, said annexation was about controlling growth around the city.See ANNEXATION/7A ALEXANDER Bush putting faith in SenatePresident wants religious charity legislation passed By Scott Lindlaw Associated Press Writer WACO, Texas — President Bush said Saturday he is trying to make government more compassionate by letting religious charities compete more easily for taxpayer money. “A compassionate government should find ways to support their good works,” Bush said in his weekly radio address Saturday. “Unfortunately, government often treats charities and community groups as rivals instead o^ partners.” Bush has been seeking to persuade Congress to pass legislation opening government’s doors wider to churches, synagogues and other “faith-based organizations.” The initiative has raised concerns that it would the constitutional separation between church and state. Bush echoed the findings of a report last week that contended federal officials routinely discriminate against religious groups when handing out grant money by taking those fears too far. The report, based on data from five Cabinet agencies, “documents a government bias against faith and community-based organizations, a bias that exists even when constitutional concerns about church and state have been addressed,” Bush said. “Government administrators restrict religious groups from even applying for funding simply because they are religious,” he said. Such government restrictions infringe on the civil rights of such religious groups, he said. Bush noted that the House has already passed the necessary legislation. He urged the Senate to do likewise when it returns after Labor Day from its summer recess.Groundwater conservation group making election plans [ inside By Martin Malacara Staff Writer The Southeast Trinity Groundwater Conservation District adopted its district boundary plan this past week, clearing the first hurdle to having an election to make itself permanent. “We’re doing everything we can to have an election in November. Right now it looks like we’re on track,” district president Stovy Bowfin said. The water district plans to call for its election when it meets at 5:45 p.m. Wednesday at Bulverde City Hall, 30070 U.S. 281 North Suite 236. If the board approves calling for the election, fifing for district director candidacies begins Aug. 23 and ends Sept. 24. Senate Bill 1911 established the groundwater district as one of 13 temporary districts. They are the state’s preferred means of groundwater management. Texas has 87 counties with groundwater conservation districts. Th become a permanent district, residents living within district boundaries must confirm the district in November. Voters also will decide whether the district will collect property taxes. The district’s board of directors established boundaries for four director districts. These districts were named A,B,C and D, to prevent confusion with Commissioners Court precincts. Because the district covers only about 75 percent of the county, the director districts could not be aligned along the county commissioners’ fines, Bowlin said. “They follow political boundaries — where the Edwards (Aquifer) stops and the Trinity (Aquifer) starts,” Bowlin said. The district does not include the New Braunfels and Garden Ridge areas. Voters in the four districts will elect one board member. The fifth board member will be elected “at large” from the entire district. Voters also will decide whether the water district will have taxing authority. The district wants to charge a 2 cent-per-$100 property valuation tax, which would not take effect until 2003. Currently, the district can only finance itself through $175 well-drilling permits and a production fee for wells capable of producing 25,000 gallons a day. The production fee is 7 cents for 1,000 gallons. See GROUNDWATER/5A Abby................................2C Classifieds.........................1-12D Comics.............................6B Lifestyle.......................1C Forum.................................6A Local/Metro........................4A Movies.................................2C On the Record.....................4A Sports...........................1-5B Today.................................2A Stocks  ........................8Awww.herald-zeitung.com Key Code 77 ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: August 19, 2001

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