New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 3, 2001

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

August 03, 2001

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Issue date: Friday, August 3, 2001

Pages available: 50

Previous edition: Thursday, August 2, 2001

Next edition: Saturday, August 4, 2001 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 3, 2001, New Braunfels, Texas s Air quality health alert KST MAILABLE COPT New Braunfels FRIDAY August 3, 2001 ZI pages in 2 sections awmmmmm    CC    pages    in    Z    Sectli Herald-Zeitung I................... I I IC I? -'" *> >' ' ------------------------ T”j Vol. 150, No. 227 Serving New Braunfels and Comal County since 1852 50 cents A shot in the arm Local officials not concerned with tetanus vaccine shortage By Martin MalacaraStaff Writer A national shortage of tetanus vaccine does not concern county health officials. County Public Health Nurse Karon Preiss said most of Comal’s population is already protected from tetanus. “We had used 600 doses of the vaccine in May and a lot of people were already covered during the (1998) flood. I think we’re ahead of the game,” Preiss said. The Texas Department of Health is deferring for one year the requirement that students have a booster dose of tetanus and diphtheira. This applies to all Texas schools from July I, 2001 to Aug. I, 2002. Once the deferment is lifted, all students will be required to show proof of a tetanus booster, according to the TDH. Last year one of the pharmaceutical companies making the vaccine stopped producing it, Preiss said. Another company is producing a new vaccine that targets tetanus plus four other diseases, but has yet to receive Food and Drug Administration approval, thereby creating the shortage. Preiss said people in need of a tetanus shot would receive one only after suffering an injury or puncture wound that warrants a shot. “We are not giving routine (shots),” she said. TDH is sending more of the vaccine to get the conn ie. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Some people like to watch, and Willie Villanueva (right) is one of those who would rather look than look away as he gets his necessary immunization shots for Canyon High School. New Braunfels Health Center immunization nurse Israel Lopez (left) and other officials are expecting a flood of students now that shot requirements are beginning to reach parents. The Health Center is at 264 W. Mill St. ty through the rest of the summer, Preiss said. The deferment mainly affects 14- and 15-year-old students, Preiss said, because they are in the age group that receives the 10-year booster shot. But, Preiss added, this age group still should receive a tuberculosis shot. Spore-forming bacteria that enter the body through a cut or wound cause See VACCINE/5A NBFD vet tapped to fill new position By Ron Maloney Staff Writer The New Braunfels Fire Department Thursday promoted a 21-year department veteran to fill its newly created deputy chief position. Battalion Chief John Herber was named to the post in a promotion ceremony conducted by Fire Chief Jack Collier and Interim City Manager, Hector Tamayo. Fire Lt. Steve Mabe was named to Herber’s battalion chief slot. Mabe’s promotion becomes effective Sunday morning. Herber begins his new duties Monday. Herber will work in fire administration, aiding Collier in the day-to-day operations of the 80-member, four-station fire department that serves New Braunfels and its adjacent areas. Collier said he is also counting on Herber’s administrative and planning skills as the department positions itself to grow and take care of the city’s future needs. “As New Braunfels is growing, the fire department will need to grow as well,” Collier said. Tm grateful to the city staff and city council for creating this new position. It was sorely needed.” In recent months, the city created deputy or assistant chief posts at both of its public safety agencies. The New Braunfels Police Department will soon name a second-in-command to Chief Ray Douglas. In remarks to firefighters and family members, Coflier praised both promoted firefighters as the very best qualified of a number of their co-workers, who also could have filled the jobs. “It’s the toughest decision — one of the toughest things one must do as a leader,” Collier said, “when you’re called upon to decide who among his peers will fill an important position. “We had many qualified personnel for both of these jobs at the New Braunfels Fire Department.” Herber spent a year as an unpaid volunteer before being hired on with the NBFD in 1979. Collier said Herber’s career and education have prepared him for the role he assumes Monday. “He’s worked in virtually every position this department has from firefighter to assistant fire marshal to battalion chief,” Collier said. “He’s done it See POSITION/5A Munoz wants apartments demolished By Amy Clarkson Staff Writer For nearly a year, the Building Standards Commission struggled with a decision: What to do with the Rosedale Apartments? And now that decision faces them once again. The city ordered residents from their home, evicted them because of safety hazards and the high potential for fires and other problems. Windows and doors are covered with plywood, weeds grow in the vacant parking lot and a daily patrol keeps both the curious and the vandals away. But the decision remains: what should be done with the vacant buildings, now sitting empty and becoming more derelict with every passing month? “I think they’ll do something this month,” City Attorney Charlie Zech said. “There will be some sort of action.” Councilwoman Sonia Munoz hopes the commission will tear them down. She’s organizing the support of the West End community to influence the commission to order their destruction. The Rosedale complex is in Munoz’s district. “I’m trying to get people to come Monday night to the meeting,” she said. ‘Td like to see them torn down.” Munoz attended the last commission meeting and told the volunteer board after the meeting she thought they should be destroyed. “Former Mayor Pro Tem Juan Luis Martinez was involved in the apartment complex when they first looked at it,” she said. “And it was just heart-rending, he said. The conditions those people were living in were just unbelievable.” Munoz said she hopes that residents from around the city will come to the next Building Standard Commission meeting to show their support for tearing down the buildings. “I hope the neighbors, the entire com-rn u n i t y come out and support what the city is trying to do here,” she said. “The city has giv-MUNOZ    en    all    the reasons to demolish those buildings — they just aren’t safe. This has gone on a long time, and we’ve all been patiently waiting to see what will happen at Rosedale. I hope the public will show their visible support for tearing the apartments down at the next meeting.” Since the commission met last month, nothing really changed — except who is responsible for the buildings. Two couples own the Army barracks- turned-low income apartments, but a real estate agency, Magi Corporation of San Antonio, hopes to buy them and build townhouses in their place. Magi held a contract to buy the land, but the purchase didn’t go through. The contract expired, Magi President Rick Rodriguez said, and has not yet been renewed. “We haven’t been able to do anything because the contract is in the hands of the owners now,” he said. “Once we have the contract renewed, we’ll be able to move ahead.” See APARTMENTS/5A K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Deputy Fire Chief John Herher (center) shuts his eyes— only half in jest—as his wife, Kim, pins on his new badge Thursday afternoon. Fire Chief Jack Collier (right) made the announcement of Herber’s promotion to the new position as interim city manager Hector Tamayo (rear) and other firefighters looked on. Inside Gala Event Abby.................. .............7 A Classifieds............ ..........4-1 OB Comics................ .............10A Crossword.......... ..............7 A Forum.................. ...............6A Local/Metro......... ..............4A Movies.................. ...............7A Obituaries............ ..............3A Sports................. ...........1-3B Today................... ..............2A The American Cancer Society’s Starlight Gala 2001, “Fabulous Forties,” will begin at 6 p.m. Friday Aug. 10, at the New Braunfels Civic Center, 380 S. Seguin Ave. General admission is $100 for two tickets. For information or to purchase tickets, call (830) 606-5810 or (830) 606-0376. Key Code 76 ft Test your cancer knowledge with short quiz By Ann Cousin Herald-Zeitung Correspondent Cancer is the nation’s No. I health concern. How much do you really know about the disease? Find out by taking the American Cancer Society Quiz. Discovery Health and the American Cancer Society conducted a national survey of Americans’ knowl-edge about cancer. The results were surprising. See how your knowledge stacks up against those polled. All questions are true/false. 1. Men have a higher lifetime risk of developing cancer in general than women. 2. Half of cancer deaths are accounted for by cancers for which there are screenings. 3. A non-smoker living in a heavily polluted city has the same chance of getting lung cancer as a smoker living in a city with little or no pollution. 4. Whether a person gets cancer has more to do with family history than age. 5. One-third of all nonskin cancer deaths are directly related to diet and physical activity level. 6. African Americans are more likely to develop cancer than persons of any other racial or ethnic group. 7. Nearly one-third of breast cancers are hereditary. 8. More Americans die from lung cancer than from any other cancer. The truth about cancer risk factors will surprise you. See page 4B for the correct answers to this quiz. ;