New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 6, 2001, Page 3

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

January 06, 2001

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Issue date: Saturday, January 6, 2001

Pages available: 14

Previous edition: Friday, January 5, 2001

Next edition: Sunday, January 7, 2001 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 6, 2001, New Braunfels, Texas Saturday, January 6, 2001 — HERALD-ZEITUNG — Page 3A Obituaries HICKS Dr. Richard Reagan Hicks Jr., beloved father and husband, went home to eternal rest and peace on January 4,2001. There he joins his Mother and Father and son, James Clifton, who untimely preceded him in death. Death came in the morning hours at Northeast Baptist Hospital in San Antonio where fellow doctors and nurses saw to it that his every need was met with loving care, comfort and attention. He died in good hands and at peace with family and friends at his bedside. And yet even though his health had declined in recent weeks, his passing still leaves those who loved and knew Reagan in a state of shock and sadness. Reagan Hicks was born February 23, 1933, in Luling, Texas, to Richard Reagan and Maurine Hicks. He attended public schools there throughout his formative years, graduating in 1950. His brilliant wit, handsome good looks, athletic abilities, charm and many other significant talents were leading indicators that he was to blaze a trail of achievements above and beyond this small Central Texas oil town. To his credit he disappointed no one. The next stop in his academic life was his beloved Texas A&M University where he was an outstanding student and member of the Corps of Cadets. Many younger cousins and friends remember being awestruck upon seeing Reagan arrive in town proudly wearing his Corps uniform and senior Aggie boots. He graduated with honors in 1954. Throughout college Reagan studied hard to become what he most desired to be a doctor. After Texas A&M he entered The University of Texas Medical School where he again excelled in his studies and was conferred the title of Doctor of Medicine in 1960. His country then called upon him to honor his earlier commitment to military service while at Texas A&M and that it would ^e(rpost fitting he should serve thre£ year's as Flight Surgeon in the U.S. Army while stationed at Ft. Bliss in El Paso, Texas. By 1963, with all academic and military requirements fulfilled, Reagan had decided that San Antonio provid ed all the benefits necessary to start practicing medicine and raising a family. There he joined the ongoing practice of Dr. Boen Swinny which at that time was reportedly the oldest allergy practice in the South. With the later addition of Dr. Swinny’s son, Boen, Jr., they practiced medicine in the old fashioned way by providing personal, detailed attention to their every patient. Many patients remember fondly Reagan’s questions and concerns about their lives, their families, even their pets, and in doing so, he was dispensing a brand of medical care that went straight to the healing of the heart and soul. Everyone felt as though Reagan truly cared about their whole being and he did. He will be remembered by his office staff who were devoted to him personally and in his practice for more than 30 years. Reagan possessed the very characteristics that every community needs not only to survive, but to prosper. Again, he did not disappoint anyone. Among his many civic and professional duties and responsibilities were those as member of the Bexar County Medical Society, American Medical Association, the Texas Medical Association, the Southwest Allergy Forum, the American College of Allergy, Immunology & Asthma, the American Academy of Allergy, Immunology & Asthma, and the Rotary Club of San Antonio. As testament to his keen insight of medical issues, he was highly respected by his many peers who called upon him time and time again for valuable advice and counsel. Among Reagan’s hobbies, golf was the love of his idle hours away from his medical practice. He was a longtime member of Oak Hills Country Club and will be sorely missed by his many golfing friends who found it both a delight and honor to be in his company whether on the golf course or in the clubhouse. Perhaps a fitting tribute to Reagan’s exuberance for life and his desire to live it to its fullest can be found in Jack London’s “Credo.” I would rather that my spark should burn out In a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom Of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days trying to prolong them. I used my time on earth for good and now it is time to say "Goodbye.” Reagan Hicks loved the Lord. He was a Christian and a member of the First United Methodist Church of New Braunfels. He is survived by a loving extended family that include his wife, Anna Lee; his daughter, Kathleen Allison; his son, Richard Reagan “Trey” Hicks III; daughter-in-law, Karla; stepdaughter, Tamara LeAn and husband, Matt Tesauro; stepdaughter, Tonya Lynn and husband, Lex Heffington; and grandson, Cason. He is also survived by his loving brother and sister, James M. “Mack” Hicks, M.D. of Austin, and Barbara Burkhardt of Lake Jackson. He will be greatly and lovingly missed by a multitude of cousins, patients, colleagues and friends. So radiant was Reagan’s love, personality, and caring that all his extended family frequently shared each others lives and experiences at the many family gatherings. The family wishes to express their gratitude to staff and nurses at the Northeast Baptist Hospital, the Heart and Vascular Institute, Drs. Whitney, Natalino, Dar and Moss for their support and attention to Reagan. The family will receive friends Sunday afternoon from 2 o’clock to 3 o’clock at Porter Loring. Funeral services will be held on Monday, January 8, 2001, at Porter Loring Chapel with graveside services on Monday at 3:30 p.m. at Luling Cemetery in Luling, Texas. The Rev. Donna Strieb and the Rev. Jon Lowery officiating. Those desiring may make memorial contributions to the American Heart Association, Cancer Therapy and Research Center or to a charity of choice. Arrangements with Porter Loring, 1101 McCullough in San Antonio. SCHOLL Surennah “Sue” Fern Scholl, age 65, of Bulverde, departed this earthly life to be with her Lord on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2001. She left in dignity and in peace with her husband and her children by her side. She was born Nov. 25, 1935, in Charleston, AR., to Sidney and Matilda (Ballard) Teague. She married Charles Robert Scholl on Dec. 29, 1959, in San Antonio. Mrs. Scholl was a member of St. George Episcopal Church in San Antonio. A loving and compassionate Christian wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, Surennah was a staunch believer in Jesus Christ as her Lord and Savior. She always was ready to take others into her heart at first meeting and was a motherly influence to all that needed it. Surennah never let any illness or adversity get her down. Her faith in God let her bounce back with an inner strength that never faltered, Her 'father, Sidney Teague, preceded her in death. Survivors include her husband, Charles Scholl of Bulverde; mother Matilda Teague of AR.; four daughters:    Surennah Marie Werley and husband, Steve, of AR.; Ernestine Lee Rangel and husband, John, of San Antonio; Jennifer Elizabeth Leal and husband, Victor, of San Antonio; and Charlotte Nada Jean Smith and husband, Joe, of Houston; two sons: Curtis Anthony Scholl and wife, Sarah, of Mich., and Matthew Joseph Scholl of Bulverde; 13 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; five sisters: Margaret Blass of Okla.; Zona Crabtree; Betty Wesson; Linda Gilsinger; and Janet Denton, all of AR.; three brothers, Calvin, Max and Ronald Teague, all of AR.; and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 6, 2001, at Doeppenschmidt Funeral Home with Pastor John Rangel off iciating. Interment will follow at Comal Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Association. Doeppenschmidt Funeral Home Briefs Peace accord process forges on WASHINGTON (AP) — President Clinton’s drive for a Middle East peace accord inched ahead Friday as Israeli officials announced approval of his formula for settlement negotiations with the Palestinians. White House and State Department spokesmen said Israel still had reservations about the proposals Clinton gave to the two sides before Christmas. They said U.S. mediators were working with Gilead Sher, an Israeli emissary, to try to overcome them. “I’m going to keep my fingers crossed,” Clinton said. Sher was dubious that much ground could be gained toward the accord that would crown Clinton’s eight years with a peacemaker’s legacy. Officials begin drafting water plan AUSTIN (AP) — With Texas repeatedly battling drought conditions in recent years, state officials are set to begin drafting a statewide water use and conservation plan. The Legislature set the statewide plan in motion in 1997 when it created 16 regional water planning districts whose job it is to study future population growth and water use and how to best use the water that’s available. The regional districts have drafted and put in place their plans and were due to report them to state officials by Friday. The Texas Water Development Board will use the regional projects to draft a statewide water use plan by next year. Internet - $7.95 mo. 56k Digital Modems E-mail No Busy Signals DSL (some areas) Multi City Access Local Access AFFORDABLE INTERNET 1-800-637-1065 • 361-883-4257 Ask for New Subscriber Promo! 24RC1M Job growth slows WASHINGTON (AP) — Job growth nationwide fell to the slowest pace in eight years with auto plants and other factories shedding thousands of workers in December. While the unemployment rate remained frozen at 4 percent, analysts predicted sharply higher numbers in the months ahead as the weak economy forces more layoffs. The Labor Department’s unemployment report Friday mirrored other statistics that have depicted an economy quickly losing altitude, raising concerns that the record 10-year-stretch of uninterrupted growth could be in jeopardy. Private payrolls edged up by just 49,000 during the month, ending a quarter in which monthly job creation in the private sector averaged just 84,000, the poorest showing since 1992 and just half the rate in the first nine months of the year. “We have an economy that has slowed dramatically, and manufacturing has sunk into a recession,” Robert Dederick, economic consultant for Northern Trust Co. in Chicago said. “The question is whether the Federal Reserve will be able to keep the overall economy from heading into a downward spiral.” The weak jobs report added to the gloom on Wall Street, as the Dow Jones industrial average fell 250.40 points to close at 10,662.01. The Dow’s slide over the past two days erased most of the 299-point gain triggered on Wednesday when the Federal Reserve, acknowledging the economic slowdown, announced a surprise half-point cut in interest rates, its biggest reduction in more than eight years. President-elect Bush seized on the Fed’s move as evidence that “bold” action was needed to ward off a recession. He urged Congress to move quickly on his $ 1.3 trillion tax cut to spur growth. No rush on Capitol Hill to embrace Bush tax cuts WASHINGTON (AP) — There is no rush in Congress to embrace President-elect Bush’s package of tax cuts, even as a tonic to the ailing economy. Republican chairmen of the tax-writing committees have their own priorities, and even GOP freshmen prefer to focus on eliminating the income tax marriage penalty. Moments after he was chosen chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Bill Thomas took a wait-and-see approach when asked about Bush’s 10-year, $1.3 trillion tax relief proposal that includes across-the-board income tax cuts. “President-elect Bush ran on some particular ideas about the tax code. We’re going to share our ideas,” said Thomas, R-Calif. His Republican Senate counterpart, incoming Finance Committee Chairman Charles Grassley of Iowa, expressed doubts this week about the political viability of Bush’s package and mentioned priorities of his own such as continued tax preferences for corn-based ethanol fuel and pension reforms. Instead of lining up behind Bush’s plan Friday, the 28 House Republican freshmen announced that their top issue as a group this year would be one piece of that plan: erasing the marriage tax penalty paid by millions of married couples. IN KW ltit*wki i.i s Herald-Zeitung Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday through Saturday by the New Braunfels Henald-Zeitung (USPS 377-880) 707 Landa St., or PO. Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Comal County, Texas 78131-1328. Periodical postage paid by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung in New Braunfels, Texas. Carrier delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three months, $22.00; six months, $40; one year, $72. Senior Citizen Discounts by carrier delivery only: six months, $36; one year, $68. Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: three months, $31.80; six months, $58; one year, $109.50. Mail outside Texas: six months, $81; one year, $ 124.25. Subscribers who have not received a newspaper by 6 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and by 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday can call (830) 625-9144 . Postmaster: Send address changes to the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, PO. Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Tx. 78131-1328. Kindermusik Village1® ages newborn to 18 months Kindermusik Out Time™ ages 11/2 to 31/2 years Kindermusik Confetti Days! ages 31/2 to 5 years Register by January 12 to receive $10 off tuition! Classes begin January 29. Call now for more information about Kindermusik, the music & movement program for young children. a good beginning* never ends Kindermusik With Miss B Tina Bourgeois. Licensed Kindermusik Educator 512/357-0059 e-mail [email protected] anvil.. Babies on Parade SPECIAL EDITION 20 Page Tab To be published: January 28th If yourvhild, grandchild, nephews, or nieces were born in the year 2000 they are applicable for the SPECIAL EDITION of Babies on Parade. A panel of judges will choose four winners that will be featured in a full page cover, back cover and 2 in the centerfold. They will also receive trophies. (Need not be from this area) Mail the coupon below along with $20.00 and a copy of child's birth certificate for EACH child who appears in photo, or come in person to: $20 NKWcBK.\l4tMHKI.S Herald-Zeitung 707 Landa Street New Braunfels, TX, 78130 (830) 625-9144 Deadline to enter Photos: January 11 th Place of Birth:_ ____    Length: Baby Name:_ D/O/B: _ Weight at Birth: Parent Names:______ Grandparents:  _ Credit Card #:__ Expiration Date: .____ Circle ©nearing credited: Uisa/Mastercard Signature:  ____________ J Check Money Order ;