New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 21, 2000

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

October 21, 2000

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Issue date: Saturday, October 21, 2000

Pages available: 36

Previous edition: Friday, October 20, 2000

Next edition: Sunday, October 22, 2000

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - October 21, 2000, New Braunfels, Texas 3(PE£&(XDQ J£k New Br/UjnfklsWater Restrictions ■ New Braunfels Utilities customers can water any day of the week before 9 a.m. and after 7 p.m. Use of hand held hoses, soaker hoses, buckets or drip irrigation is allowed any time. Zeitung T"—— .ii-- Vol. 149, No, 257    18    pages    in    2    sections    October    21,    2000 Saturday Serving Comal County since 1852 50 cents Photo Submitted Comal County Judge Danny Scheel recognizes Sammy Zeller’s nearly 17 years of county service Thursday. Sheriffs office retiree cleans out her desk By Ron Maloney Staff Writer A couple of captains, a lieutenant and very few others have been around the Comal County Sheriff’s Office as long as Sammy Zeller. 77, has. “I can count them on both hands,” Zeller said. Zeller ended a nearly 17-year career with Comal County' Friday afternoon. “I started down in the old jail at the courthouse with Sheriff Walter Fellers,” Zeller said. “You didn’t have the pleasure of knowing old Walter Fellers. He was a pleasant man to work with .... You had a problem, talk to him — be the first one to talk to him. Sheriff Fellers was understanding, but he liked to be kept informed.” Zeller started in dispatch, where she spent several years. She ended her work Friday in the warrants department. “There aren’t many of us left from when I came here,” she said. Zeller came to the sheriff’s office a little* later on in life than some of her coworkers. Before that, she was a homemaker; she also had worked at McKenna Memorial Hospital. “I didn’t do much work until the week before my 60th birthday,” Zeller said. “I started with the sheriff’s office, and I’ve been here ever since.” Zeller decided she wanted a job, she said, to secure her future. She soon found, though, that she just plain liked the work. She can remember earlier in her career going out after her shift as a dispatcher to see what happened with a situation she had dispatched to Canyon Lake. “To me, that was my call. I wanted to know what had happened,” Zeller said. Zeller has seen her third sheriff in Bob Holder, and she has seen a lot of others come and go. Back when Zeller started, the sheriff’s office was a much smaller operation than it is today. “We had a little section back in the back (of See RET1REE/10A Krause’s last perk Longtime regulars play final coffee game Friday K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Kermit Krause (center) takes notes as guesses are called out on the day’s coffee-game number at Krause’s Cafe Friday morning. George Goepf (right) chose what might be the final number at Krause’s. By K. JESSIE SLATEN Staff Writer For almost 50 years, the Stammtisch table at Krause’s Cafe was the setting for a weekday morning game of skill and challie. On Friday, the players lined up for what might be the last round of the coffee game at the downtown restaurant. Krause’s Cafe closes its doors about 2 p.m. today after 51 years of food service to New Braunfels. One of the players, former U.S. Senator and ambassador Bob Krueger, said, “I feel like I'm going to a funeral.’ Kermit Krause, the original owner of the restaurant, said the weekday coffee game had been around as long as the business. For years, the game never started without Krause’s official “go” • Friday was no different. As Krause pushed his speedy wheeled-walker through to the table, he asked the rit- K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-Zeitung Members of the- Downtown Rotary remove their meeting podium and flags from Krause’s Cafe Thursday afternoon. ual question, “Are we ready to play the coffee game?” Pens and pieces of paper appeared on the table as the men gathered around the oval table and pushed their coffee and breakfast plates aside. As required by the game, Thursday s w inner George Goepf wrote a number between one and 5(10 ona guarded piece of paper. Hie object of the game, depending on which way you look at it, is to guess or not guess the number. The w inner bought everyone's coffee. Slowly, the men called out one number at a time. Each number answered w'ith “high” or “low.” With each answer, pens scribbled on paper to keep track of the correct range of the numbers. The men’s responses took on ah air of sadness as the players realized they were zoning in quickly on the right answer. Usually, guessing up or down by only one number is frowned upon in Bob Krueger bids adieu to Krause’s Cafe./6A See KRAUSE’S/10A New Braunfels dons red to fight drugs By Jo Lee Ferguson Staff Writer The Safe City Commission wants New Braunfels to see red this week. Red Ribbon Week kicks off today and ends Friday after a week of activities to promote a drug free New Braunfels. Red Ribbon Week began after the 1985 murder of a drug enforcement agent Schools plan events for Red Ribbon Week/10A who was kidnapped and murdered by Mexican drug dealers. His friends and family began to wear red badges of satin in his honor. The event is now a national celebration in which millions of people, including New Braunfels residents, participate each year, said Don Ferguson, assistant to the city manager. “The commission is encouraging residents to wear red ribbons throughout the week to show their support for the anti-drug effort and also asking residents to take part in as many of the activities as possible,” Ferguson said. Any red ribbon will work, he said. “One of the things we want residents to do during Red Ribbon Week is realize that our community, like many others across the country, has a drug problem and the way to attack that problem is to join forces and take a stand against drugs,” Ferguson said. Activities planned by the commission for Red Ribbon Week include: See RED/10A Inside Gridiron roundup Rangers, Unicorns clash in District 27-4A action/1 B Cougars, Billies meet in big red battle/1 B Developers storm city with plats, master plans New projects try to beat proposed drainage rules By Jo Lee Ferguson Staff Writer Plat requests and master plans are flooding New Braunfels city offices these days as a proposed drainage ordinance nears approval. The planning commission, w hich meets once a month, considers master plans and plats for approval. Planning Director Harry Bennett said the commission typically considered eight to IO plat requests each month and master plans “once in a great while.” However, the city recently received 31 plat applications for commercial, industrial and residential developments. The planning commission also will consider six master plans at its next meeting, Bennett said. “We can pretty much guess that they’re trying to bypass the drainage ordinance and the requirements that are coming,” Bennett said. The pending ordinance includes two proposed fees, one that would be levied against new development. The proposed watershed system development fee would be levied on every piece of land where development is proposed. City council will not set the fees until later However, the current proposed fees range from $ 1,200 an acre to $3,000 an acre. The difference in fees depends on whether the land is residential, non-residential, single-family or multi-family and the amount of impervious cover on the lots. One version of the ordinance would have waived the watershed system development fee for developments with final plats filed before the ordinance became law. The current version, however, would waive the fee for single-family residential developments with: • a master plan approved by the planning commission and a master drainage plan approved by the city engineer before the ordinance’s effective date; • a final plat approved by the planning and zoning commission; or See DRAINAGE/10AInside Abby................... .............5A Classifieds............ ...........4-8B Comics................. .............5A Crossword............ .............5A Forum................... ..............6A Local/Metro.......... .............4A Movies................... ..............5A Obituaries............. ..............3A Sports.................. ..........1-3B Today................... .............2A Coming Smday www.herald-zeitung.com Key Code 76 tere are only nine days left until Halloween. Do you have your costume? /J not, area vendors said it is not too late to find that outfit./Lifestyle IC School builds patriotism brick by brickThird-grade class dedicates flag replicas By Jennifer Rodriguez Staff Writer About 200 third graders wiggling on the cafeteria floor at Memorial Elementary were stilled to attentiveness when two students in teacher Red Garcia’s class began to speak at a ceremony Friday. Garcia’s class spearheaded the event to unveil two brick replicas of the U.S. and lex as flags that eventually will be planted on a berm in front of the school. “This is what education is about — kids teaching kids,” Garcia told the audience. “The kids doing all the work, mid we teachers just sitting back and enjoying it.” The third-graders continued sitting still throughout a speech by Medal of Honor recipient Louis R. Rocco, and they raised their hands noiselessly to answer even his rhetorical questions. Only when they performed three patriotic songs did they spring into the higher gear most adults expect from 9-and 10-year-olds. They sang with theSee CLASS/10A K. JESSIE SLATEN/Herald-ZeitungStudents at Memorial Elementary sign and sing America the Beautiful at Friday’s dedication service. ;

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