New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 14, 2000, Page 6

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

October 14, 2000

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Saturday, October 14, 2000

Pages available: 36

Previous edition: Friday, October 13, 2000

Next edition: Sunday, October 15, 2000

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About New Braunfels Herald ZeitungAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 312,053

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.06+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 14, 2000

All text in the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung October 14, 2000, Page 6.

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - October 14, 2000, New Braunfels, Texas Page 6A — Herald-Zeitung — Saturday, October 14, 2000Opinions FORUM Letters New R&a&nfels Herald-Zeitung New Braunfels Zeitung was founded 1852; New Braunfels Herald was founded 1890. The two papers merged in 1957 and printed in both German and English until 1958. Doug Toney, Editor and Publisher Margaret Edmonson, Managing Editor Michael Cary, News Editor Kudos It is so nice to be able to say that once again, the Friends of the Library had a very good sale and say thank you to the citizens of New Braunfels for their support in both donating to the sale and then coming to buy books at the sale. The books you donate go either to the library collection, our book store or the annual sale. We welcome your magazines, videos, tapes and CDs also. All funds raised benefit the New Braunfels Public Library. We sponsor the monthly book reviews, cooperate with the League of Women Voters and McKenna Memorial Hospital to provide the book Goodnight Moon to all babies bom at the hospital, buy books that the library can provide on a rotating basis to Head Start campuses, help with landscaping at the library, and will add to the book and video and audio collections in the future. We are pleased to be able to help where extra is needed. The extras that we are able to provide at the library come from the dedicated work of the volunteers who spend long hours sorting books, work in the Friends Bookstore (give Sue Ragusa and her crew lots of credit for the bookstore), and then spend more hours at the book sale. We even end up buying lots of books ourselves and the next year we donate them back and do it again. My heartfelt thanks to all the friends who make this possible each year. The Friends could not undertake this each year without the support of many in the community. We say thank you to Mr. Lee Stang of AAA Mini-Storage, Lester Stockhorst of Print-it, Carol Gephardt of Prime Source Books, Nevitt Moving and Storage, Benny Ruiz of Handy Andy for saving those boxes for us, Ken Lowery for loaning us his antique car for the Fair Parade, Judd Rogers of Sign Connection for donating signs for the side of the car, the Senior Citizen center for their donations, for the library staff who cooperate with us, and a special thank you to the radio stations (KGNB and KNBT) and Herald-Zeitung for their support and help. (Thanks, Jo Lee Ferguson.) It has been my pleasure for the past four years to have been very closely associated with this book sale and to the Friends and the citizens of New Braunfels. I can only say thank you, thank you. You have been great and it has been a wonderful experience. Margaret Brazle President, Friends of the Library Today in History By The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Oct. 14, the 288th day of 2000. There are 78 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Oct. 14, 1960, the idea of a Peace Corps was first suggested by Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy to an audience of students at the University of Michigan. On this date: In 1066, Normans under William the Conqueror defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings. In 1890, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, was bom in Denison, Texas. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt, campaigning for the presidency, was shot in the chest in Milwaukee. Despite the wound, he went ahead with a scheduled speech. In 1933, Nazi Germany announced it was withdrawing from the League of Nations. In 1944, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel committed suicide rather than face execution for allegedly conspiring against Adolf Hitler. In 1947, Air Force test pilot Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager broke the sound barrier as he flew the experimental Bell X-l rocket plane over Edwards Air Force Base In California. In 1964, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Letters To The Editor Mayor betrayed public’s trust Dear Editor: Betrayal ofTrust. One has to have staying power to keep up with what is really happening at city council. In the Oct. 9 meeting, the next-to-last item on the agenda was “Discuss and Consider Establishing Criteria for Impervious Cover for Land.” This concerns developing criteria for ensuring that the amount of impervious cover in a lot or development does not contribute excessively to the runoff/drainage of water and permits adequate percolation for ground water/aquifer recharge. It was put on the agenda by District 4 Councilman Robert Kendrick. The many developers and builders who remained to the late hour did so for a good reason. It seems they all had or had seen copies of a draft of a possible ordinance on this issue which was being developed by Councilman Kendrick and City Attorney Floyd Akers. It seems Mayor Stoney Williams obtained a copy from the City Attorney and faxed it to Stephen Schultz, of the Schultz Group, who in turn disseminated it to developers. Other council members were upset that they were not even aware of this proposed ordinance. But it appears that the “Old Boy” network was well informed. Mayor Williams’ reaction to this was to make light of his betrayal of the trust of council and the people, which prompted me to depart the meeting in disgust. Almost as disquieting but not surprising to me anymore is the lack of reporting of this serious issue by the media. I recommend interested citizens view the re-telecast of the end of the council meeting. Paul J. Martinka New Braunfels Ask legislators what they have done for nation Dear Editor: We know that our Republican Congressman Lamar Smith will be back in District 21 running for re-election. Now is a good time to ask all our representatives how they voted on the Pork Barrel Great Highway Robbery — that removed 1.8 billion dollars from the VA. Write ’Em Medical Care Program. How did he vote on the bill to balance the budget by reducing the funding for Medicare and Medicaid? This partisan vote took billions of dollars from our elderly and disabled citizens. I am dismayed to learn that our elected officials have passed cost of living increases for a $3,800 on each of three occasions — while voting down an increase in minimum wages for the working poor (three times) these actions are without shame. Now is the time to return what programs our legislator supported to improve the conditions of this nation’s veterans — Hispanics, blacks and the working poor. Perhaps it is time to remove some of these politicians from office and replace them with individuals who are truly dedicated to the people’s needs. This is a good time to remind ourselves of the observation of Teddy Roosevelt (The Trustbuster). “This will not be a good nation until it is a good nation for all.” Also, remember the GOP dictum, “Never forgive and never forget.” Tom O'Brien New Braunfels U.S. CONGRESSMAN Lamar Smith, R-San Antonio Room 2231 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-4236 HOO NE Loop 410, Suite 640 San Antonio, TX 78209 (210)821-5024 Ciro D. Rodriguez k D-San Antonio Room 323 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-1640 1313 S.E. Military Suite 115 San Antonio, TX 78214 (210)924-7383 GOVERNOR George W. Bush State Capitol, Room 2S.1 P.O. Box 12428 Austin, TX 78711 (800) 843-5789 Fax: (512) 463-1849 www.governor.state.tx.us STATE SENATOR Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio 1250 NE Loop 410, Suite 720 San Antonio, TX 78209 (210) 826-7800 Fax: (210) 826-0571 Judith Zaffirini D-Laredo P.O. Box 627 Laredo, TX 78042-0627 (956) 722-2293 12702 Toepperwein Road #214 San Antonio, TX 78233 Got Something To Say? The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung encourages letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer’s signature. Also, an address and a tele phone number, which are not for publication, must be included for confirmation purposes. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters to: Letters to the Editor do the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, TX 78131-1328 Fax: (830) 606-3413 e-mail: [email protected] bones about it: ‘Mascot’ made difference during flood Our newsroom has a mascot. Some of my own employees do not know this. Only recently did I share the story of our mascot with a photographer who happens to share the darkroom with it. The mascot is The Skeleton, a Halloween decoration hanging on the closet door in the darkroom. It is more than just another piece of paper that no one had time to take down from a wall or remove from a desk. For me, it is a reminder of the 1998 flood. The Skeleton joined the Herald-Zeitung newsroom a month before the flood. It arrived as part of a feeble attempt — almost a joke — to decorate the newsroom. We made so many jokes about the flimsy paper cut-out that it * seemed only natural for then-sports edi- Margaret EDMONSON tor Tom Erickson to grab it when evacuating the building on Oct. 17, 1998. When we gathered at publisher Doug Toney’s home, we rejoiced the survival of The Skeleton. It surely would have been lost when six feet of water swept our offices, but lo, it survived. Looking back, I think that it helped us believe we would survive, too. The Skeleton stayed with us through those two very long days working at the publisher’s house and went with us as we moved to the Seguin Gazette-Enterprise. I’m sure our fellow journalists in Seguin wondered about us as we unfolded The Skeleton fropi our box, which basically held our newsroom. Here we were, four computers to our name and no home, and here was this silly decoration. I did not think much about it. We taped The Skeleton to the card table on which we worked, and we took The Skeleton with us a week later when we moved into our temporary digs on Business 35. Its* photograph even was published in the Austin American-Statesman when the paper did a story about our flood experience. When Christmas came, we decorated our tabletop tree and slapped a Santa hat on The Skeleton. Six months after the flood, The Skeleton and we packed up our new computers and moved into our new desks in the refurbished Landa Street building. Since then, the newsroom has changed. I alone carry the story of The Skeleton. I try to share the story, but I don’t think anyone who did not go through the flood really understands my attachment to this Halloween decoration. I did not lose my home in the flood, and many people in this town lost everything. What happened two years ago was a tragedy, and I hope I never have to go through something like that again. But, I have The Skeleton to remind me that we survived, no matter how difficult the work was or how tired we were or how angry we felt. We rebuilt our news room and our newspaper. I hope other people who went through the flood have something to remind them about their struggle and their survival. I'm sure those reminders carry painful memories for many people. I hope they can look past the bad stuff and remember the good parts: the volunteers who offered their assistance, the way neighbors helped each other physically and emotionally, the way this community worked together to survive. On Tuesday, the two-year anniversary of the flood, I'll move The Skeleton to my office. It might look silly to some people. But I know what it means to me and the folks who worked here during the flood. (Margaret Edmonson is the managing editor of the Herald-Zeitung.) ;

RealCheck