New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, July 26, 2000

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

View full pageStart a free trial

Issue date:

Pages available: 32

Previous edition:

Next edition:

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication

About NewspaperArchive.com

  • 2.16+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Find your ancestors now
Start your Genealogy Search now
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, July 26, 2000

Get access to these newspapers Plus 2.16+ billion other articles

OCR Text

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - July 26, 2000, New Braunfels, Texas The American Cancer Society’s Starlight Gala 2000 is Friday,    v August 4, and will include dinner, dancing, casino-style gaming, silent and live auctions. For ticket information, call 609-5030. All-or-nothing proposition goes to By Jo Lee Ferguson Staff Writer New Braunfels City Council has for weeks debated the city’s sales tax allocation and uses. The issue resolved itself Monday night in a split vote that could lead to the demise of the city’s economic development corporation. Council narrowly agreed to ask voters in November to abolish the economic development corporation and the one-eighth of I percent sales tax that supports the corporation's work. The tax and corporation are referred to as the 4A tax and 4A corporation. In the same proposition, voters will be asked to reallocate the economic development sales tax to what is known as the 4B corporation, also named after its enabling law. City Attorney Floyd Akers said the measures approved for the November election will appear as one item on the ballot. Voters will not be able to vote against eliminating the EDC, but for opening the 4B tax to all legal uses. The 4B corporation currently oversees a total one-quarter of I percent of the city’s sales tax. Half of that is devoted to streets and drainage projects and half goes to other capital improvement projects. The ballot proposition would eliminate the separate pools of money and make the total sales tax going to the 4B corporation three-eighths of I percent. Then, the ballot proposition would open up the uses of the money to everything allowed by state law, which includes economic development. Councilman Larry Alexander presented a proposal Monday that left the economic development sales tax untouched but asked voters to expand the uses of the money to the 4B corporation to include voters On The Ballot Voters will consider the following items in one ballot proposition in November: •Abolishing the economic development corporation, also called the 4A corporation; • Abolishing the one-eighth of 1 percent sales tax collected by the 4A corporation; • Adopting a one-eighth of one percent sales tax to be collected by the 4B corporation; • Removing the current one-eighth of 1 percent cap on streets and drainage projects and the one-eighth of 1 percent cap on capital improvements on the use of the sales tax revenues collected by the 4B corporation; and • Authorizing the entire three-eighths of 1 percent sales tax that would then be collected by the 4B corporation to be available for all permissible uses under state law. every legal use. When voters approved the 4B tax in 1995, several of the possible uses for that money were excluded. However, Councilman Robert Kendrick amended Alexander’s proposal to abolish the 4A corporation and reallocate that tax to the 4B corporation. The rest of Alexander's motion remained unchanged. The council voted 4-3 in favor of Kendrick’s proposal.Water Restrictions ■ New Braunfels Utilities customers with addresses ending in 3, 4 or 5 can water today before 9 a.m. and after 7 p.m. Well users with addresses ending in 4 or 5 can water today between midnight and 10 a.m. and from 8 p.m. to midnight.Vol. 149 No. 182    18    pages    in    2    sections    July    26,    2000    xtt    J    atx    a    *    r    Serving    Comal    County    since    1852    50    cents Wednesday McKenna Memorial plans economic survival By Ron Maloney Staff Writer It is an uncertain time to be in the health care business anywhere in the United States — but more Last in a Series uncertain still in the current climate is the future of small urban hospitals. More than IOO small town hospitals are expected to close this year in Texas alone, and McKenna Memorial Hospital McKenna 2000: Prognosis for hope lip re J must plan carefully to make sure it is a survivor and not a statistic. Tim Brierty, CEO of the McKenna Health Care System, said the hospital is doing just that. “Our three goals are high quality care, service excellence and financial security,” Brierty said Tuesday. “My personal opinion is that if we accomplish the first two, the third takes care of itself.” When Brierty arrived here, McKenna was a $40 million business. Now, it is a $100 million business, annually — about $30 million of which goes into payroll. “For the financial security piece, we have to make sure as a team that we’re efficient and we spend our revenues conservatively and w isely,” Brierty said. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 took a precarious situation and made it worse. Now, Brierty' said he hopes the federal government has realized it has made a mistake — and will correct it quickly. See McKENNA/3A Feeling right at home Hematology Oncology Associates spares patients long drives to Austin, S.A. Blood work Right: Deborah Naumann watches Physician’s Assistant Michael McGrath, P.A.-C, M.A. prepare her finger for testing Monday afternoon at Hematology Oncology Associates of South Texas. Lower right: Medical Dosimetrist Rebecca Mclnturf studies a new patient’s records. Mclnturf is the radiation therapy supervisor. K. JESSIE SLATEN/ HERALD-ZEITUNG By Betty Taylor Features Editor Anew state-of-the-art cancer treatment and care facility in New Braunfels means much more than a new' building to cancer patients in this area. The Cancer Care Institute of South Texas, a member of the Hematology Oncology Associates of South Texas, offers patients the care they need, without the drive to San Antonio or Houston. The center, at 1448 E. Common St., prov ides medical oncology and state-of-the-art 3-D imaging, radiation oncology services for Comal, Guadalupe and Gonzales counties. “We basically offer a variety of services in hematology and oncology,” said Dr. Alexander Zweibach, who came to the facility shortly after it opened in October 1998. Zweibach earned his medical degree and Ph.D. in hematology from 1st Pavlov Leningrad Medical Institute, Leningrad, Russia, w here he became chief of the Department of Hematology. He is board certified in internal medicine, hematology and medical oncology and has more than 20 years of practice and research experience. Dr. Allan W. Cass, radiation oncologist at the institute, said this was the first time radiation therapy was offered in See HEM APOLOG Y/3A CISD to hike teachers’ pay By Heather Todd Staff Writer Comal Independent School District trustees approved Tuesday night pay raises for all district employees, including a $1,000 increase to starting teacher pay, that will force some budget cuts to alleviate an $89,000 deficit. Trustees approved the pay raises for teachers, nurses, librarians, counselors, associate psychologists, paraprofessionals, maintenance and mechanic staff, and custodians before approving the 2000-2001 budget on August 17. Bus drivers and food service staff received a pay increase last year. The paraprofessional pay raises were approved last year as a two-part increase. Abel Campos, business manager for CISD, told trustees he would attempt to present a balanced budget to trustees when they approve the budget and tax rate August 17. But, balancing the budget could require additional cuts unless there is a change in revenue figures, he said. Already cut from the budget was $400,000 for eight buses and seven teacher positions at a cost of $280,000. Trustees scheduled a public hearing on the proposed $60.2 million budget and a proposed tax rate Aug. 17 at Canyon Middle School. Campos said a decision on staff'pay raises was needed prior to the Aug. 17 meeting because the first payroll was scheduled September I. l ite pay raises adopted by the board include a mini-See RAISES/3A Inside Abby......................... .......5A Classifieds................. . .4-8B Comics...................... .......2B Crossword................. .......5A Forum......................... .......6A Local/Metro................ .......4A Movies......................... .......5A Obituaries................... .......3A Sports........................ ....7-8A Today......................... .......2A Television...................... 8A www.herald-zeltung com Key Code 76 Committee welcomes Henry By Jo Lee Ferguson Staff Writer The New Braunfels hotel occupancy tax committee meeting began w itll a few tense moments Tuesday but ended with the welcome of a new member. The city council on Monday agreed to allow the hotel industry to nominate someone from its ranks to be a member of the committee, which was appointed to develop a plan for using an unallocated portion of the city’s hotel motel tax revenue. The New Braunfels Lodging and Restaurant Association nominated its president, Dan I leary, who is general manager of Rode-way Inn, in time to attend Tuesday’s committee meeting. However, one committee member questioned if the council’s final vote Monday had actually said the lodging association would get to pick die one additional member. Another committee member challenged Henry’s qualifications to be on the committee because he is not a city resident. City Attorney Floyd Akers, however, told the group that the council motion had said the lodging association would get to pick the one new member. Also, he said die council had not placed any restrictions on that person’s residency. “They could be from Jamaica as far as I’m concerned,” Akers said. But dunng most of the meeting committee members worked easily together and several members welcomed I lenry as the meeting ended. “I have nothing against any of you on this See HENRY/3A ;

RealCheck