New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 18, 2000

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

May 18, 2000

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Issue date: Thursday, May 18, 2000

Pages available: 28

Previous edition: Wednesday, May 17, 2000

Next edition: Friday, May 19, 2000

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 18, 2000, New Braunfels, Texas >4... New Baas^vels Heral Water Restrictions ■ New Braunfels Utilities customers with addresses end ina in 6,7,8 or 9 can water today. Well users with addresses ending in 6 or 7 can water today. Vol. 149 No. 129    14    pages    in    2    sections May 18, 2000 c- YO I • * Pi i ^ N°tn iBl Thurso ------------- Jomal County since 1852 50 cents Local eatery is cookin’ Owners of Huisache Grill honored Design for pipeline approved Project would supply water to western Comal County By Erin Magruder Staff Writer Guadalupe-Bianco River Authority board of directors came one step closer Wednesday to completion of a more than $40 million treated water supply project that would deliver much-needed water to western Comal County. The board, at its regular meeting, gave the thumbs up to a project design study necessary for the proposed 43-mile pipeline and a treatment plant on the south side of Canyon Lake, said David Welsch, GBRA project development director. “There’s been a lot of progress,” Welsch said. “Now we can proceed to define the actual pipeline route, make size and unit cost estimates and work on other things to keep the project moving along.” The “Western Comal Treated Water Supply” project is designed to hit crucial delivery areas along a route than runs from Canyon Lake down Farm-to-Market Road 3159 and then in a western direction to the Bulverde area, Fair Oaks Ranch and Boerne, Welsch said. The project also will supply water to residents out-of-dis-trict, and contracts already have been signed with the San Antonio Water System (SAWS), the San Antonio River Authority (SARA) and the Bexar Metropolitan Water District. The Bexar county water customers will use and pay for water not required in-district immediately, with the provision that the supply will be returned as needed, said Judy Gardner, GBRA director of communication and education. The Bexar county agreements also will provide an economically feasible firm water supply to in-basin customers, such as Bulverde area residents, Gardner said. GBRA also is negotiating contracts for the water supply with the Comal Independent School District, potential developments and other critical service areas, Welsch said. “I would anticipate those contracts will be signed within 60 days,” he said. The 10-million-gallon-per-day treatment plant included in the project will deliver about 10,000 acre-feet of water per year to customers from a diversion point at Canyon Lake, Gardner said, and system capacity could be increased with the additional contracts. The treatment plant also is designed to provide relief to Bulverde area residents who have relied heavily on the See PIPELINE/8A By Ron Maloney Staff Writer Huisache Grill was hustlin’ and bustlin’ at IO a.m. Wednesday as Don and Lynn Forres and the rest of the staff prepared for their 11 a.m. opening and their customarily slammin’ and jammin’ lunch for the locals. But the public beat the path to their door early — in the form of the Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce, Inc. — with banners, plaques and placards proclaiming the Forres family as this city’s Small Business Person —people — of the Year. They and their business are the 11th winners of the award in New Braunfels. Last year, the honor went to Carol Johnson of Johnson Furniture; the year before to Randy Vanstory of Quick Align. Wednesday’s recognition came just two days after the Forreses were given the Chair of the Board award at Monday’s chamber luncheon for their effort to revitalize downtown. Two separate chamber committees decided the two honors. The Forreses have operated Huisache Grill since late 1994. “This is just so unexpected and appreciated,” said Lynn Forres after the award party dropped into the    RON    MALONEY/Heraid-Zeitung restaurant. “We just couldn’t have done Don Forres, left, and Lynn Forres, right, owners of Huisache Grill in downtown New Braunfels, accept the Small Business Person of the Year Award from Richard Smith, middle, and the Greater New Braunfels See HUISACHE/8A Chamber of Commerce, Inc. WORD encourages safety By Erin Magruder Staff Writer A wild ride down the Guadalupe River Memorial Day weekend could culminate in a rather unpleasant trip to the Comal County Jail for residents and tourists who disregard the law, board members of the Water Oriented Recreation District said. After a successful run last year — the second tourist season armed with beefed up security means the banks will be crawling with law enforcement officers ready to snatch troublemakers off the river. To ensure the holiday weekend flows as smoothly as possible, the board approved a protocol for the Comal County Sheriff’s Office Wednesday evening that encouraged the enforcement of the district’s statutes, ordinances and rules, WORD manager George Cushanick said. Rules that will be strictly enforced include no plastic foam on the river and no glass containers — both of which violators could be cited or arrested for by Sheriff’s deputies, the board said. See WORD/8A File Photo Tubers enjoy weather on the Guadalupe River. Oldest public camp on Comal River will celebrate 90th anniversary Friday By Erin Magruder Staff Writer Nestled in a horseshoe bend and shaded by ancient cypress and pecan trees, The Other Place Resort is rich in history. After all, it is the oldest public camp along the banks of the Comal River. Originally Camp Giesecke, the resort will celebrate its 90th anniversary at 5:15 p.m. Friday with a ribbon cutting cere mony and dedication of a new cottage named after a long-time guest of the vacation spot at 385 Other Place Drive. The New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce, Inc. also will be on hand at the celebration to honor Jerome Zubik of College Station, who for 60 years made an annual summer trek to the resort with his family. Four generations of the Zubik family will help dedicate the new, three-story cottage called “Zubik House,” which was designed to resemble the original cottage built in 1908 by late Texas A&M University professor Ernst Giesecke. Giesecke used the property as a summer retreat for his architecture students to gain valuable hands-on experience in projects such as the building of a dam See CAM P/8 A Barry and Sarah Shea (with five-year-old daughter Regan) worked hard to get the feel of an old lodge for their newly built cabin, using bunk beds, high ceilings, old fixtures and more. K. JESSIE SLATEN/ Herald-Zeitung Inside Abby......................... .......5A Classifieds.................. ...4-6B Comics....................... .......3B Crossword................. .......5A Forum......................... .......6A Local/Metro................ .......4A Movies......................... .......5A Obituaries................... .......3A Sports............................ .....1-2B Today............................. ........2A Television...................... ........SB www.herald-zeitung. com Key Code 76 Original movies by SVHS students light up theater By Heather Todd Staff Writer SAN ANTONIO —It wasn’t a flashy Hollywood premiere with big-name celebrities, red carpet and bright lights. And you couldn’t say the “premiere” — at IO a.m. on a Wednesday with a handful of people in the audience — went off without a hitch. During the premiere of one short film, a technical problem made the picture jump every few seconds. Even so, the audience watched the remaining 11 minutes of the film —jumps included — and applauded enthusiastically at the end. This, indeed, was a movie premiere where critics and artists walked away happy. That Is because the directors were Smithson Valley High School students in Roy Hargrove’s film class. After spending the semester writing, directing, producing and editing their own films, they got to see their work on the silver screen. Management at AMG Huebner Oaks Theater in San Antonio opened one of the state-of-the-art stadium-seat theaters so the students could premiere their films. “It was awesome,” senior Tristan Shutt said after watching the film he helped produce roll across the wide movie screen. Shutt and senior Mike Erickson worked on a short film about a young man’s attempts to renew a relationship with his father. Erickson said the idea for the movie started with a lawnmower, which was used in the film as a symbol of the father-son relationship. “The idea for the movie was kind of random. But, we knew we wanted a lawnmower,” Shutt said. Erickson said the idea for the movie clianged several times during a three or four-month period until it finally evolved into the 12-minute film. “The editing takes a lot of work,” he said. Hargrove said students grouped and produced three films as an end-of-the-semester project. Students also had the option of writing research papers or producing a film tty themselves. One movie, produced by senior Daniel Keller, featured a character named Beach Ball, who, incidentally, was a beach ball who fights the villain and wins the girl. Keller has been accepted to the University of Texas at Austin School of Communications, where he plans to study radio, television and film. The other film was a documentary about the SVHS campus and students. Haigrove has taught the film class every semester for the past two years, but he saidSee MOVIES/8A ! ;

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