New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, August 1, 1999

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

August 01, 1999

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Issue date: Sunday, August 1, 1999

Pages available: 60

Previous edition: Friday, July 30, 1999

Next edition: Tuesday, August 3, 1999 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - August 1, 1999, New Braunfels, Texas VIV FELS Vnnoo MO09 10/22/99 SO-UM! It ICROPUBLISHXNC; 262? E YANDELL DR EL POSO, TX 79903-Herald-Zeitung Vol. 148, No. 182    50    pages    in    4    sections August I, 1999 Sunday ^erv*n^ ^orna* bounty s*nce ^52 $1.00 Inside August means summer heat and a return to the classroom. We’ve got back-to-school covered, with supply lists for area schools. /INSIDE New Braunfels Christian Academy supplies /10A ► Registration time Information for new and returning students in Comal and New Braunfels independent school districts is right here. From registration to immunizations to Fish Camp, you’ll find answers to all your questions. /2A, 4A ► Fashion show Before hitting the stores to enjoy tax-free shopping this weekend, be sure the clothes you buy follow the new dress code for your school. Take a look at some dos and don’ts for fall fashion and find out which clothing and accessories won’t make the grade at area schools. /1B Weather The brutal summer heat continued to bake most of Texas Saturday. Not much relief is expected any time soon, as highs throughout Texas are predicted to remain in the upper 90s and 100s See page 2A for the forecast. Index Abby.................................... 2B Business............................. 5-6B Classified.......................... MOC Crossword.......................... 2B Forum................................. 6A Local/Metro......................... 4A Movies................................ 2B Obituaries........................ 3A Sports................................. ...11-14A Today.................................. ..........2A Television............................ Montaae Key cod# 77 Separated from his sisters at age 5, David Wilson has spent more than 25 years Unlocking the past WAI Ll/Herald-Zeitung Photo courtesy David Wilson David Wilson (top and above left) developed a sense of responsibility at a young age. As a big brother to sisters Sandy (center), Patty (right) and Veda Rose (not pictured), he initiated the search for his siblings after they were separated by adoption in 1959. “As close as we were, it was a tragedy losing my sisters,” he said. Loyalty, love helps search for family continue By Chris Crews Staff Writer Five-year-old David Wilson knew something was wrong as he walked down the sidewalk with his three sisters in the summer of 1959. Leaving their foster home, he saw two sedans parked at the curb. Rear bumper to rear bumper, the cars faced opposite directions. The grown-ups ushered David to the car facing east and his sisters, — 3-year-old Sandy, 2-year-old Patty and I-year-old Veda Rose — were steered toward the westbound car. As quickly as engines could be started and gears engaged, the only family David had ever known was tom apart. “As close as we were, it was a tragedy losing my three sisters, whom I took care of, played with and shared those little things that brothers and sisters share,” Wilson said. Forty years later, the image of the three sobbing girls looking out the back window is vividly etched into his memory. A Love As Kure As This As I sit here in this lonely room on such a night as this I see beyond my misty eyes a love as rare as this My sisters ’ love is all I need to make my world complete Sandy, Putt}', Veda Rose until some day we meet Our lives were changed in '59 when MV were forced to part With only memories of that time to cherish in our hearts They changed our lives but not our love, a love that M ill never die Sandy, Patty', Veda Rose for all of this I cry As I sit here in this lonely room on such a night as this I ponder deep within my heart of a love so rare as this A brothers love is allyou need to make your M<orld complete Sandy, Patty’, Veda Rose until some day we meet I Love You, Your Brother David Woman's search for family leads her to Germany — Page 4A “I stayed glued to the back windshield for a long time, even after they dropped out of sight. I cried for a long time after that. I felt alone, but I always felt that someday I would see them again,” Wilson said. Wilson had taken responsibility for his half-sisters early in life. They were abandoned at birth by a young father who wanted nothing to do with the responsibility of raising a child and often were left in the care of others by a teen-aged mother who loved the night life. The last time he saw his mother, he was 4. It was March 1959, and she had left the children in the care of Cheyenne Indians in the Oklahoma panhandle town of Boise City. His mother, Lovenia Williams, had moved the family across the state to Boise City from the northeast Oklahoma town of Talequah because she was wanted for child neglect. See SEARCH/5A Pearland man, 21, drowns In Guadalupe From staff reports The search for a missing swimmer ended tragically Saturday, as rescue workers found the body of a 21-year-old Pearland man in the Guadalupe River. The man was reported missing at 10:26 p.m. Friday. He was part of a group that had been swimming in missing 10:26 p.m. Friday Guadalupe River Body found j | 5:49 p.m. Saturday I Loop 337 the river throughout the day about 50 yards upstream from the Loop 337 bridge and returned that evening. New Braunfels Fire Department Battalion Chief Frank Gonzales said the man soon became separated from his friends. He said witnesses reported seeing the man wading into chest-deep water, and one allegedly heard a shout. Gonzales said about 20 people, including divers from the New Braunfels Fire Department, Comal County Emeigency Services and San Marcos Area Recovery team spent Saturday searching for the man. He was found next to a pillar on the Loop 337 bridge and recovered at 5:49 p.m. on Saturday. Comal County Judge Danny Scheel was on the scene and pronounced the man dead. The victim’s name was not released, as officials said family members had not yet been notified. The drowning was the third in Comal County this year. Pete Sosa. 33, died June 12 in Canyon Lake and Bradley Dietrich, 45, leaped into the lake and drowned on July 6. Evergreen Townhomes denied funds Low-income housing project not among those sharing state tax credit By Peri Stone-Palmouist Staff Writer AUSTIN — A proposed housing development for low- to moderate-level income families in New Braunfels was denied tax credit Friday for the second year in a row. The Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs board announced who did receive the tax credits to a packed room, which quickly dispersed upon hearing the news. Fifty-three of the 209 applicants were awarded a total of $21.4 million in federal housing tax credits, representing 4,364 units of affordable multi-family housing in cities such as Houston, Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, Brownsville, Georgetown, Wimberley and Eagle Lake. Evergreen Townhomes, the 80-unit project proposal in New Braunfels by Amistad Affordable Housing, Inc., was not on the list. “It’s a very competitive process,” TDHCA spokeswoman Heather Tindall said. Last year, 56 applicants out of 195 received $27.6 million in tax credits. Amistad’s project, Huisache Villas, intended for a site off Business 35 near w hat is now Paramount Bowl, wasn’t on that list either. Projects in San Marcos, Seguin and several other cities also weren’t granted tax credits. “I’m scratching my head,” co-developer Mike Fields said Saturday. “We were expecting to get it, but there were a lot of developers Se© EVERGREEN/9A ;