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   New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung (Newspaper) - March 9, 1999, New Braunfels, Texas                                NEW fELS 20332 MOO 9 7 SO WEST MICROPUBLISHING 2627 E YflNDELL PR EL PflBO TX 79903 ZEITUNG Vol 148 No 77 12 pages in 1 section March TUESDAY Serving Comal County since 1852 50 cents River cleaners taking weekends off ROBIN Workers unload equipment from trailers on Monday near the Guadalupe River in Gruene Debris removal crews will work at different areas in a 15mile stretch of the river Guadalupe debris removal limited to weekdays only BY CHRIS CREWS Staff Writer Debris removal crews in the Guadalupe River will make weekday a choppy adventure for the next few weeks but the contractor in charge of die cleanup said the river would be wide open for weekend recreation We need to keep them off of the river Monday through Friday but on Saturday and Sunday they can have the whole said Joe Ramon Jr of Ramon and Sons construction The river will remain open during the week but three crews will work at different areas on the 15 mile stretch of river from FarmtoMarket Road 306 to Gruene to remove debris left by the Octo ber 1998 flood Ramon said safety officers would place orange netting across the river preventing water recre ationists from entering the work areas The board of directors of the Water Oriented Recreation District approved an ordinance last week making it a Class C misdemeanor to float boat or swim within 200 feet of designated work areas Violators would be subject to a fine not to exceed Jake Minton manager of Gruene River Com pany outfitters said weekday tubing would be difficult on the upper part of the river but the sec tion from Gruene to Cypress Bend Park in New Braunfels would be open on weekdays Minton said Ramon was working closely with outfitters to keep the river clear for the busy weekends when outfitters made most of their money If theyre out of the water on Saturdays we can go Minton said The contract for the cleanup administered by the federal Natural Resources Conservation Ser vice allows for 75 days to complete the project See Poultry pals Canyon High school freshman Bryan Schneider holds up one of the many chickens that will be shown in this weeks Comal County Livestock Show Canyons show chicken project is now it its fourth year ROBIN HeraldZeitung CHS show chicken project teaches lessons in weather BY VANCE STAMEY HeraldZeitung Correspondent Theres not a lot expected from the chickens in a livestock show besides bulk ing up and hanging out with other chick ens Theyre all said Scott Wiemers a 17yearold junior at Canyon High School They just eat sleep and lay around all day long Thats about it as you can The show chickens lives dont last for ever After their sixweek growing period is over their fate is invariably sealed Most end up butchered cleaned and processed regardless of whether they finish first or last The Canyon High School show chick en project is three years old and is super vised by faculty member Glen Grimm who also sponsors the students lamb projects Participating students enter their chick ens into competition through the Canyon High School chapter of the Future Farm ers of America The number of chickens that actually make it to the livestock shows is consid erably lower than the number of hatch See STOCK SHOW SCHEDULE Swine arrival to 7 Wednesday weighing to Wednesday judging 2 Thursday departure for nonsell animals 5 to 8 Friday Goats arrival noon to 7 Wednesday weighing 6 to 7 Wednesday judging 9 Thursday departure for non sale animals 5 to 8 Friday Sheep arrival noon to 7 Thursday weighing 6 to 7 Thursday judging 9 Friday departure for nonsale animals 5 to 8 Friday Cattle arrival noon to 7 Thursday weighing 6 to 7 Thursday judging Friday departure for nonsale animals 5 to 8 Friday Rabbits arrival 4 to 7 Thursday weighing 4 to 7 Thursday judging 8 Friday departure for nonsale animals after judging Friday Broilers arrival 4 to 7 Thursday weighing on arrival Thursday judging 8 Friday departure for nonsale animals after judging Friday Turkeys arrival 4 to 7 Thursday weighing on arrival Thursday judging 8 Friday departure for nonsale animals after judging Friday Little League city officials play hardball BY BILL OCONNELL Staff Writer Squeezing nearly baseball players onto five fields only two of which are lighted is the quandary faced by New Braunfels Little League officials as a March 22 season opener approaches fast In a city that receives up to million in tourism revenue yearly some local residents have begun questioning where the national pastime ranks among New Braunfels1 list of priorities one MEETING WHAT Special meeting between city officials Little League volunteers and parks and recreation advi sory board members WHEN 6 Wednesday WHERE New Braunfels municipal building 424 S Castell Ave WHY An opportunity to discuss the citys support of Little League programs New Braunfels Little League president Jbtt Effis said Having endured recent criticism for not support ing youth baseball New Braunfels city officials plan to set the record straight City council members are scheduled to meet with local Little League baseball officials and parks and recreation advi sory board members at 6 Wednesday at the municipal building 424 S Castell Ave The public meeting was seen by city officials as an opportunity to rebut what city manager Mike Shands called a lack of factual information about the citys par ticipation in Little League baseball There has been misinformation about the extent of the citys contribution and support of youth baseball activ Shands said Shands specifically pointed to two letters that appeared in the HeraldZeitung on Feb 28 He rejected a readers suggestion that the city did not contribute a dime to the new Little League complex at Loop 337 near Landa Street Shands said Monday mat the city paid nearly for the purchase and develop ment of the 43acre site Shands also tried to clarify city policy regarding the maintenance of the new Little League fields He said the city signed a 20year lease with local Little League offi cials giving the baseball group exclusive rights to the complex Shands said a responsibility to maintain the facilities went along with the authority to use them Larry Schwab a member of the citys parks and recre ation advisory board said he believed it was unlikely the parks system could maintain the Little League complex The financial burden on the parks department after the October flood probably ruled that out Schwab said City council discusses then delays tree issue in mayors absence Staff Writer New Braunfels city officials real tion advocates discussed a dying tree ordinance Monday night like a group of physicians debating whether to pull the plug on a nally ill patient would surgeon Jan Kennady council man bars voted to table the third and final reading of the ordinance until March 22 Kennady reportedly was ill and could not attend Mondays city council meeting The proposed ordinance remained a shell of the document that first went before council in February Having removed a number of reg ulations from an ordinance designed to limit the number of mature trees cut down during residential and commercial development some council members and area ejs tiiBgejtpitl fiiirther cutting would improve the document I dont think we need to add to the cost of building a home in New said local builder Steven Lange who proposed exempting residential developers Other area residential builders and ing much of what the tree ordinance intended to guarantee was accom plished naturally The fact is that trees do replace said builder Don West Some city council members apparently agreed with local devel opers sentiments Council member Cathy Talcott said she believed the outoftown developers that want to make a fast were responsible for the rel atively largescale destruction of trees in New Braunfels Not everyone in attendance at Mondays council session agreed with the optimistic prognosis for the local tree population Members of a tree preservation ordinance com mittee mat helped draft the docu ment under consideration said they believed local residents backed the proposed policy I feel like the tree ordinance wouldnt be where it is right now if there wasnt considerable public sup port for said committee member Tun Cronin i The ordinance was revised and V approved by council at regular meetI ings on Feb 8 and Feb 22 l INSIDE   

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