New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, September 11, 1997, Page 5

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - September 11, 1997, New Braunfels, Texas Herald-Zeitung g Thursday, September 11,1997 g SA World/ National Briefs Vtrtatn* Miior Burys M«rudtth <H— st BB LOS ANGELES (AP) — Burgess Meredith, versatile, raspy-voiced actor whose film roles over 60 years included the fated hero in “Winterset,’* the tragic caretaker in “Of Mice and Men’* and the crusty boxing manager in “Rocky,” has died. He was 89. Meredith died Tuesday morning at his home in Malibu, his son Jonathan said. He had suffered from ’ melanoma, Alzheimer’s disease and other complications of old age, his son said. He sometimes wrote, directed or produced his films. In later years he often took roles that seemed beneath his status as one of America’s distinguished actors. He explained to an interviewer in 1967: “If I spent all my time in Shakespearean companies and only did art movies li)ce Olivier, my position would be more dignified and more serious. I might even be a better actor. But this is America, and I’m a man moved by the rhythms of his time, so 1*11 just take amusement at being a paradox.** Fuds Mf up shop al Union Pacific lo monitor safety OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Federal regulators will take the unprecedented step of setting up shop at Union Pacific headquarters to monitor safety at the nation’s largest railroad because of violations found after a string of crashes over the summer that killed seven people. ‘’The size of this railroad calls for different and unique fixes to what we Consider serious deficiencies,” Federal Railroad Administration spokesman David Bolger said Wednesday. The move came after a 16-day FRA inspection by about 90 investigators that found fatigued Union Pacific crews working long overtime, defective equipment and harassment and intimidation of employees reporting safety problems. The agency will decide how much to fine the railroad. It will also continue monitoring Union Pacific and place one official at the company’s headquarters in Omaha to work with railroad executives, a1 step never taken before, Bolger said. (/mon Pacific officials said they know the company has problems and hope the federal agency will help fix the errors. DPS says It wfN boost number of tioopors on Mfltiwoys AUSTIN (AP) — More state troopers will hit Texas highways over the next I 1/2 years, the head of the Public Safety Commission pledged Wednesday. Chairman James B. Francis said he outlined the plan to Gov. George W. Bush after state auditors attributed a shortage of troopers to the Department of Public Safety spending money earmarked for new officers on other things. “We already have selected candidates for the Sept. 23, 1997 recruit school, and we plan to put more than IOO additional troopers to work on Texas highways during the next 18 months,” Francis said. “We intend to comply with the Legislature’s intent of improving public safety by putting more troopers to work as soon as possible.” Bush summoned Francis to the meeting, and the governor was satisfied with the DPS plans. Survey; More drug deals take place at school NEW YORK (AP) — Schools are no safe haven from drugs since more teen-agers see drug deals at school than in their neighborhoods, a new survey found. Forty-one percent of high schoolers said they witnessed drug deals on school grounds, while 25 percent claimed they saw them in their neighborhoods, according to a study released Monday by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. School officials saw much less — only 12 percent of the 789 high school teachers questioned witnessed drug deals at school. The summer survey of 1,115 students from urban, suburban and rural schools across the country had a margin of error of 2.9 percentage points. The margin of error was 5 percentage points for teachers because fewer teachers were surveyed. Growers optimistic about pecan crop COLLEGE STATION —. Although it still could go either way, the 1997 Texas pecan crop is giving growers cause for optimism, the Texas Agricultural Extension Service reports. Extension economist JosePeftaOf Uvalde said this ycar^iffifttotcs very promising in cdoapuriato-to the ■ low yields from last year’s drought-plagued crop. “We have a very good bumper crop this year,” Pena said. “It’s a little late and green, but overall a good crop.” Cindy Wise, Executive Vice President for the Pecan Growers Association, said even though there are no official numbers yet, all evidence is pointing towards high yields. “lf pecan growers received adequate water on their crops, we should not only have high yields, but also high quality,” Wise said. This quality will determine how steady market prices will hold, said Extension Horticulturist Dr. Larry Stein. “Beginning market prices are expected to be the same as last year’s ending prices,** Stein said. “After that, prices will be determined by the quality of the crop.” Stein said die higher the quality of pecans, the more likely that market prices will hold steady, lf quality <hops over time, prices will start to fall. He said the weather will play a key role in determining what kind of crop will be harvested. Extension service hosts goat clinic Until we get drugs out of our schools, we’re not going to have the kind of quality education that everybody dreams about.’ — Joseph Califano addiction research center president “While our schools used to be sanctuaries for students, many have become candy stores of dangerous substances — cigarettes, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, heroip, cocaine and acid — sold or used by classmates on the school grounds,” said‘Joseph Califano, former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare and president of the addiction research center. “Until we get drugs out of our schools, we’re not going to have the kind of quality education that everybody dreams about,” Califano said in recent editions of The New York Times. Rates were lower for middle schoolers — 18 percent had witnessed drug deals at school, compared to 12 percent in their neighborhood. The study also found that three-fourths of high school students and nearly half of middle-school students say drugs are kept, used or sold on school grounds. Over a fourth of high school students also said that a student in their school died from an alcohol-or drug-related incident in the past year. Thirty-five percent of teens cite drugs as the most important problem they face, slightly up from 32 percent in 1995 and 31 percent in 1996. Students at schools where marijuana was available were four times likelier to try it. Meat goat entries are increasing steadily and demand for information has prompted the Texas Agricultural Extension Service to offer a show goat clinic at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Comal County Fairgrounds. The program will be on show goats and will be geared to benefit 4-H and FFA youth planning on showing goats this show season. Speaking will be Warren Thigpen, 6*11 YEARS OLDFALL ALLERGIES? Do you have a RUNNY NOSE, SNEEZING, CONGESTION or ITCHY EYES in September or October? If so, we need volunteers for an allergy research study involving an investigational medication.ti years NO CHARGE FOR; CHILDREN “U-    *    Allergy    skin testing I    •    Physician    monitoring a Lab tests \\    kits/ Qualified patient* may ba compensated up to $120.00.CENTRAL TEXAS HEALTH RESEARCHRSW BRAUNFELS, TX 78130 6294030    6094900    (METRO) New grad school guides contain goofs, omissions HOUSTON (AP) — Texas Christian University hasn’t had a law school since 1920. But there it is in “The Insider’s Book of Law School Lists.” “We appreciate getting national recognition, but unfortunately the facts are wrong,” a TCU spokesman told the Texas Journal of The Wall Street Journal in Wednesday editions. That’s not the only error in the new guide books on medical, law and business graduate schools, published by New York-based Kaplan Educational Center. Under the “near the beach” heading in the medical school guide, there’s no mention of the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Graduate schools at Rice University and the University of Houston also are omitted. The books also list the University “Pecans love sunshine,” Stein said. “Even though we would like a little more rain and cooler temperatures, a month of overcast skies could do just as much damage as the heat.” < lf raiMB'riot'available. Stein said "many ga*?** tm walt equipped to fcrigate> H6weCer;Ttif those who do not irrigate, weather conditions are a much bigger concern. The amount of rainfall received in the upcoming weeks will determine crop size and quality, he said. Another factor is insect damage. While most crops experienced some problems, Pena said, insects have not caused extreme damage this year. “The insect problems have been much lower than usual,” Pena said. ’Most growers were able to take control and the rains we had in June really helped by knocking insects off the trees." Wise added that insect problems in the early spring actually helped this year’s crop develop. The insects thinned out the crop and kept trees from becoming too heavily loaded. “Other growers have the option of having trees mechanically shaken to reduce the load,” Wise said. While no one will know for sure how good this year’s pecan crop will be until it is harvested, Pena said he is optimistic about the outcome. “After the drought and the pecan nut casebearer problems we endured last year, this year’s crop is expected to be much larger and of better quality,” he concluded. of Texas-Pan American in Edinburg as one of seven universities in Texas “where they have a bounty on liberals.” Truth is, the Lower Rio Grande Valley area is a Democratic party bastion. Houston didn’t make the grade under schools listed as close to “great basketball,’’ despite the Houston Rockets’ NBA championships in 1994 and 1995. The Houston Comets’ WNBA title this year came after the guides were published. And Texas Tech University in Lubbock is described as “ugly” and “in the sticks.” The guides’ author. Mark Baker, lived in Lubbock as a child and defends the portrayal, saying he remembers his parents’ car being pelted with mud drops when dust storms would be followed immediately by rain. But Baker concedes his errors on TCU’s phantom law school and Houston’s basketball prowess. As for Texas Pan-American, he says he improperly presumed that all Texas cities are conservative redoubts. In his book on law schools, he also identifies St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, another Democratic stronghold, under the heading of “schools for arch conservatives.” Recently Moved? Getting Married? New Baby? Give us a calif INTERSTATE MOBIL Lots Available $140 MO. This doctor has joined Secure Horizons. Why don't you? \.4‘ county extension agent and meat goat producer from Bandera County. He will discuss all aspects of exhibiting goats, including topics on selection, care, feeding, fitting and showing. Also on hand will be Barry Myrick, speaking on the nutritional aspects of meat goats. For more information, contact Wade Mayfield, county extension agent, at 620-3440. Secure Horizons, offered by PacifiCare of Texas, Inc., a federally qualified HMO, one of the nation s leading health care plans for people with Medicare, is pleased to announce the addition of this physician to Secure Horizons' list of contracting primary care physicians. McQueeney Medical Clinic Jane V. Pearce, MD. Richard P. Branson, PA. Physician Assistant And if you join Secure Horizons today, you can take advantage of everything we have to offer, tex). Now we give you even more doctors to choose from. Doctors who are close to home and part of your community. Which means Secure Horizons is an even better health care value than ever before. To find out why Secure Horizons is just what this and hundreds of other doctors ordered, call 1-800-248-3988 for your free information kit today. Call for a free information kit 1-800-248-3988 SecureHorizons Offered by PacifiCare of Texas, Inc. Secure Horizons is offered by PacifiCare of Texas, Inc., a federally qualified HMO with a Medicare Risk contract Premiums may apply and benefits may vary throughout the HCFA approved service atta. All Members must use contracting providers and continue to pay their Medicare premiums Copayments will apply All Medicare beneficiaries may apply. Please refer to the phone number listed above for further explanation of limitations, exclusions and specific benefit cost \ I I I i i \ <. c \ i i: \ i> A l< Krauses Restaurant Kountry Kitchen Molly Joe s 148 S.. Castell 924 FM 78 1153 Oasis Street New Braunfels Schertz New Braunfels Friday, September 12 Thursday, September 25 Friday, September 26 2:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m. Refreshments Sensed! whynp22-9'r ;

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