New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, July 11, 1997, Page 8

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

July 11, 1997

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Issue date: Friday, July 11, 1997

Pages available: 40

Previous edition: Thursday, July 10, 1997

Next edition: Sunday, July 13, 1997

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - July 11, 1997, New Braunfels, Texas SA G HerakJ-Zeitung □ Friday, July 11,1997New virus adds to growing list of tick worries More people susceptible as more relocate to rural areas By TARA MEYER Associated Press writer ATLANTA (AP) — Lyme disease? That’s old news. Scientists have discovered a new virus carried by ticks. And they say it’s just the beginning, now that the spotlight on Lyme disease has sparked new interest on the biting, bloodsucking bugs. “There are viruses and bacteria that we don’t know about simply because we haven’t looked,” said Duane Gubler, who studies tick diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “I think as we study them, we are going to find even more.” Besides the well-known Lyme disease, scientists know of at least seven illnesses caused by tick bites. Now, researchers at Harvard University, Yale University and in Spain have isolated a new virus in deer ticks in New England. While they aren’t sure how it will affect human health, related viruses discovered in Europe cause severe brain swelling and can be deadly. “lf it does actually affect humans here, the potential for severe illness is there,” said Sam Telford, a parasitologist at the Harvard School of Public Health, who wrote about the new virus in the April-June issue of the CDC’s journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. Telford and a team of scientists discovered the virus while studying bacteria that cause human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, a potentially fatal illness identified last year that is caused by black-legged ticks. The team was studying the salivary glands of ticks when it came across the virus. The team injected the virus into mice to study its effects. The result: The mice quickly died. “Just the fact that deer ticks have a virus is cause for concern,” Telford said. “That’s why we are aggressively looking at what this means for public health.” The tiny tick is proving to be a terror, Lyme disease reached record levels in 19%. The pests have multiplied in the past few years, thanks to snowy winters that preserve their nests and rainy springs that give them the perfect place to thrive. There are more than 850 species of ticks worldwide, IOO of which > transmit diseases. Other tick-borne diseases often go undiagnosed^*» because they mimic Lyme disease * and its flulike symptoms. They * include babesiosis, Rocky Mountain -spotted fever, Colorado tick fever, ’ tularemia and ehrlichiosis. Ticks and the diseases they can i transmit will continue to thrive as • people move into their hideouts, the • CDC’s Gubler said. Besides woods, ticks can be found in meadows, weeds, caves, cabins and on lawns. TAHC now testing horses for swamp fever License tags — renew them every 12 months, and you can go just about anywhere, anytime. Get your horse tested every 12 months for Equine Infectious Anemia, commonly called “Coggins” or “Swamp Fever,” and you can take your animal just about anywhere, anytime. After six months of requesting voluntary compliance with the EIA testing requirements, inspectors from the Texas Animal Health Commission, the state’s livestock regulatory agency, began checking test papers July I. TAHC inspectors drop by randomly at fairs, events, rodeos, roping competitions and trail rides to ensure that all equine (horses. donkeys, mules, asses or other members of the horse family) have been tested within the past 12 months for the viral disease, EIA. Owners or riders are to have with them either their animal’s original EIA test document, called a “VS IO-ll” form, or a copy of the form that has a second, original signature by the issuing veterinarian. An EIA test within the past 12 months is also required when equine are privately sold, said Dr. Terry Beals, TAHC executive director and state veterinarian He said sellers and buyers could decide who would pay for the test, which runs about $20 to $25 for an accredited veterinarian to CANYON LAKE CHAMBER EVENTS Calendar of Evant* Farm-to-Market today    Dove Plumbing ribbon cutting, 2 p.m. 2673 in Sattler today    Canyon Lake Suites & Tenants ribbon cutting, 5 p.m., Farm-to-Market 2673 in Sattler July 17    Chamber Mixer at Canyon Animal Clinic, 5:30 p.m., Farm-to-Market 1834 in Sattler, across from Old Sattler Bakery July 19 &    Old Gruene Market Days, 10 a m to 6 p.m., contact 20    Debbie Fessler, 629-6441 July 23    Reminder — no luncheon    in    July July 23 &    Web Site Design Workshops    — special    to    Chamber 26    members, 8 30 a.rn to    4    p    m,    $40    cost    includes materials, software and lunch Aug 5    Chamber Board meeting 6 30 p m. at Chamber office Aug 14    UTSA Small Business Development, appointments required, cai! Chamber for appointment Chamber mixer at GVTC • Reminder — no luncheon in August Aug 21 Aug 27 1997 Monthly Meetings First Tuesday of each month irst Wednesday First Thursday Second Tuesday Second Wednesday Second Thursday Third Tuesday Third Wednesday Third Thursday Fourth Monday Fourth Wednesday Fourth Thursday • Canyon Lake Chamber of Commerce Board meeting, 6 30 p m at Chamber office • Eastern Star Chapter 1103 at Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m.. call 899-3713 for information • Fischer Store School Community Center meeting 6 30 p m , call 964-2176 for information • Noon Lions Club meeting, noon at Dam Red Barn • Canyon Lake Masonic Lodge No 1425, 6 30 p.m. meal, 7 30 p m meeting • Evening Lions Club meeting, Startz Cafe • Patchwork Squares dance club. Smithson Valley Red Barn, Junction Farm-to-Market 311 and Farm-to-Market 3159, call 899-7521 or 899-4849 for information • Village West P O A Board of Directors meeting, 7 p rn at Village West club house • Canyon Lake Art Guild, 1 p m Canyon Lake Action Center • UTSA Cynthia Arnold, Norwest Bank, Sattler • Women in Business dinner/lunch, call DeeDee Dunn for details, 964-3033 • Toastmasters International, 7 p m. Lodge at Turkey Cove, call 899-2776 for details • American Legion & Auxiliary at Post No 643, 7 30 p m • Canyon Lake/Fischer F C E., 9 a.m. at Fischer School • Friends of the Library, 2:30 p.m. at the library • Patchwork Squares Dance Club • Evening Lions Club, 7 p.m., Startz Cafe • Noon Lions Club, noon, Dam Red Barn • Canyon Lake Retired Teachers Association, 9 30 a rn., Rio Raft meeting room, September through May only • Computer Club, 6 30 p.m., GVTC auditorium, call 964-3715 for information • Chamber of Commerce luncheon, speaker to be announced • Canyon Lake Area Council of Property Owners Association, 7 pm, Canyon Lake Action Center, call 964-2265 for information • Toastmasters International, 7 p.m., Lodge at Turkey Cove, call 899-2776 for information Source: Canyon Lake Chamber of Commerce rD Do You Have Mild to Moderate lf so, we need qualified volunteers, 12 years of age or older, to participate in an asthma research study. Participants will receive physician monitoring, an EKG, lab work, chest x-ray, and asthma medications at no cost. Compensation up to $360 for your time. Children Studies Now Enrolling Metro- 609-0900 Central Texas Health Research draw and submit a blood sample, complete the necessary test record, and the cost of the laboratory work. “More durn 550 infected have been detected in Texas since Sept. I, 19%,” Beals said. “In some cases the infection causes the equine to develop fever, weight loss and severe anemia. However, many infected equine have symptoms only when they are overworked, stressed or injured, and then they may recover,” he said. “Finally, there are animals that show no signs of illness. These ‘inapparent carriers’ still can be instrumental in spreading infection.” (Submitted by the Texas Animal Health Commission) INTIKSTATE MOilllLI IMI Lots Available $140 MO. Sleep on the best bedding for less than you’d spend on a cup of coffee. Bosh irepedie* Support Only From Sealy’ Queen Set Couvelier Sealy Posturepedic Twin I*....... *149 Full ........ *209 King Size Set... ‘699 EKENMMT a edge Starcke Still Has FREE Delivery! 20 Sealy Posturepedics on display at the Sleep Shop “Starched 87-year tradition assures you qf quality aud service at low prices.” (? 104 N. Austin 372-4532 300 S. Austin 379-4622 ;

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