New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 22, 1997, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

April 22, 1997

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Issue date: Tuesday, April 22, 1997

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Sunday, April 20, 1997

Next edition: Wednesday, April 23, 1997

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 22, 1997, New Braunfels, Texas 4 □ Herald-Zeitung g Tuesday, April 22,1997 . Opinion ■ To talk with Managing Editor Micah Boyd about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, Ext. 220. Hera Z e i t u n g QUOTABLE “If you think of all the innovations, the successful ones, in communications and the media in virtually our lifetime—all of them have beat based on someone’s insight that went contrary to the information available at the moment.” Richard Clurman journalist, c. 1995 EDITORIALEarth DayTexans should not ignore Mother Nature Texans are lucky. They live in a region where wide open spaces still exist. One can drive IO minutes out of New Braunfels and feel dwarfed by the power of nature. The places in America where that can happen are fast becoming history. Texas is so wide open, in fact, that we can delude ourselves into thinking that mankind cannot possibly do anything to damage something so huge as the part of Earth called Texas. “Property rights” are fighting words in Texas. Some Texans tend to think that owning a piece of land gives a human being a right to dispose of that land as he wishes — to exploit, to pollute, to destroy. The Texas ecosystem is what scientists call a “complex system.” The variables which interweave to make up the Texas ecology are so complicated that scientists cannot predict what will happen if a species, a river or a forest is lost. Are people really owners of the land, or are they just stewards? There is a difference between the two. Future generations — our descendants — will have to live in the world we leave behind. Today, on Earth Day, we should all pause to think about what our lifestyle is leaving behind for the heirs to the Texas landscape. (Today s editorial was written by Herald-Zeitung News Editor Susan Flynt England.)Write us ... The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer’s signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters tot Letters to the Editor do the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 New BraunfelsHerald -Zeitung Editor and Publisher, Ext. 201........................................Doug Toney Managing Editor, Ext 220...............................................Micah Boyd Classified Advertising Manager, Ext 214...............Karen    Reinmger Business Manager, Ext. 202  ...................................Mary    Lee Hall Circulation Director, Ext 228...................................Carol    Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman, Ext 205.........................................Billy Parnell Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday through Fnday by the New Braunfels Herald-Antung (USPS 377-880) 707 Landa St. or P O Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Comal County, Tx. 78131 -1328. PenodicaJ postage paid by the New Braunfels Herald-Af Hung in New Braunfels, Texas t artier delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three months, $20.50; su months, $37; one year, $66. Senior Cih/en Discounts by earner delivery only: six months, $33; one year, $62. Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: three months, $30.30; six mouths, $55; one year, $103.50. Mail outside Texas: six months, $78; one year, $118.25. Subscnbers who have not received a newspaper by 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Fnday or by 7:30 a m on Sunday may call (210)625-9144 or by 7 p m. weekdays or by 11 a m. on Sunday. P</SimasI ta: Send address changes to the New braun/els Herald- A Hung, P.O. Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Tx. 78131-1328. Opinion Online contact ■ To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the managing editor’s address is [email protected] Magazine gives beef industry bad rap American ranchers and farmers provide the world with the highest quality food and fiber available, using the most remarkable advances in productivity in the history of agriculture. The glaring absence of those essential facts in a recent article published by a magazine associated with the otherwise esteemed Smithsonian Institution was offensive. The cover of Ae March issue of MUSE, a magazine whose intended readers are children ages 6 through 14, featured a photograph of a calf with the caption, “Please don’t eat me.” The cover story was blatantly biased against ranchers and the meats they produce. One quote, “The hamburger on your plate is some dead cow’s muscle,” was placed in large print in a sep arate box and was clearly intended to discourage children from eating beef. As a father and a rancher who represents many people who have devoted their lives to agriculture, I could not allow this story to go unchallenged. So I contacted the top official at the Smithsonian. MUSE is associated with the taxpayer-funded Smithsonian Institution. But Ae magazine is a private publication. To its credit, the Smithsonian Lamar Smith immediately reviewed the article and admitted that a serious mistake had been made. Michael Heyman, secretary of the Smithsonian, responded to me as follows: “I fully agree with the concerns Aat you have raised and would like to apologize for the lack of balance in the article concerning the consumption of meat. Clearly, no magazine that bears the Smithsonian name should attempt to proselytize for a specific cause or viewpoint, and since Ais case violates that principle, I must offer my sincerest apologies and assurances Aat such a case shall not be repeated.” Mr. Heyman also informed me that the editor of MUSE magazine has been replaced. And Heyman promises that an article reflecting the views of ranchers will be published in Ae next issue. Ranchers routinely face enough challenges including too little rain, unpredictable livestock prices and overzealous federal regulators. They certainly should not also be subjected to unwarranted, biased attacks on the important products they provide. We have a responsibility to provide children wiA fair, accurate information on all topics. Reading materials for children should cultivate their minds with balanced content. And those materials should not attempt to mislead and deceive them. (Lamar Smith represents District 21 in the U.S. House of Representatives.) *; »    I ^    J ...    ,,    I    T State bill would put teeth in protection for elderly During the last two decades Texas’ senior population has grown more than twice as fast as the rest of the population. By the year 2000 approximately 2.63 million Texans will be at least 60 years old, comprising 13 percent of an estimated population of 20.3 million. By 2020 the state’s 65-and-older population is expected to double, increasing the importance of addressing issues such as retirement, health care, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease and longterm care. The senior population’s dramatic growth in Texas reflects that of Ae nation’s. President John F. Kennedy observed that “this increase in the life span and the number of our senior citizens present this nation with increased opportunities: the opportunity to draw upon their skill and sagacity — and the opportunity to provide the respect and recognition Aey have earned It is not enough for a great nation merely to have added new years to life — our objective must also be to add new life to those years.” Currently, the Texas Department on Aging is the stale agency mandated to serve seniors age 60 or older. Senate Concurrent Resolution 36 by myself and Rep. Harvey Hildebran, R Kerrville, would help Texas meet the challenge of canng for an aging population. The resolution endorses TDA’s effortsToday in History The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, April 22, the 112th day of 1997. There are 253 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On April 22, 1994, Richard M. Nixon, the 37A president of the United States, died at New York Hospital-Comeli Medical Center, four days atter suffering a stroke. He was 81. On this date: In 1509, Henry VHI ascended the throne of England following Ae death of his father, Henry VU. In 1864, Congress authorized the use of the phrase “In God We Trust” on U.S. coins. In 1889, the Oklahoma Land Rush began at noon as thousands of homesteaders staked claims. Judith Zaffirini to form a partnership of state agencies and elected officials to address major policy issues related to aging. The partnership also would develop materials for a public awareness campaign, “Aging Texas Well,” to help individuals and families prepare for retirement and aging. Representatives of banking, savings and loans, law, health care, housing, business and industry, media, faith communities, senior citizen groups and TDA would be included in the partnership. Because we must not allow even one senior Texan to be neglected or abused or to suffer needlessly, I filed legislation that would safeguard the rights of seniors. Senate Bill 61 by myself and Rep. Hugo Berlanga, D-Corpus Christi, would enhance Ae punishment of persons who fail to report the abuse of elderly or disabled persons. Under the provisions of SB 61, which the Senate passed March 11, anyone who knowingly fails to report Ae abuse, exploitation or neglect of In 1898, the first Act of the Spanish-American War rang out as the USS Nashville captured a Spanish merchant ship off Key West, Fla. In 1930, the United States, Britain and Japan signed the London Naval Treaty, which regulated submarine warfare and limited shipbuilding. In 1944, during World War ll, U.S. forces began invading Japanese-held New Guinea with amphibious landings near Hollandia. In 1954, the televised Senate Army-McCarthy heanngs began. In 1964, President Johnson opened the New York World’s Fair. In 1970, millions of Americans concerned about the environment observed Ae first “Earth Day ” In 1993, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was dedicated in Washington, D C., to honor the victims of an elderly or disabled person would be charged wiA a class A misdemeanor that is punishable by up to six months in the county jail, a fine not to exceed $2,0000, or both, lf the House of Representatives passes SB 61 and Gov. George W. Bush signs it, the law will become effective Sept. I. Many Texas seniors reside in responsible long-term care facilities where they receive and enjoy the care and respect they deserve. Others, however, are not as fortunate. SB 190 by myself and Rep. Elliott Naishtat, D-Austin, would extend that care to all seniors in long-term care facilities by strengthening nursing home regulations. The bill would require strict monitoring of long-term care facilities to ensure their compliance wiA health and safety standards and impose prompt and effective penalties for noncompliance with licensing standards. In Texas approximately 23 percent of the state’s $5.57 billion Medicaid budget for fiscal year 1996 is expended on nursing facility care. The enormous cost, the increase in our retirement population and evidence of alarming conditions in some nursing homes predicated the need for nursing home reform. A work group comprised of staff members representing the 11 senators Nazi extermination. • Ten years ago: Joe Hunt, leader of a social and investment group called the “Billionaire Boys Club," was convicted by a jury in Santa Monica, Calif., of murdenng Ron Levin, a con man whose body has never been found. Hunt was sentenced to life in prison. Five years ago: The Supreme Court heard arguments on Pennsylvania’s restrictive abortion law. The court upheld most of the law’s provisions the following June, but also reaffirmed a woman’s basic right to an abortion. In Guadalajara, Mexico, more than 200 people were killed by a series of sewer explosions. One year ago: After 11 days of focusing on Hezbollah guerillas, Israeli warplanes turned to a new target in Lebanon, attacking the heavily fortified who serve on the Senate Health anc Human Services Committee, which I chair, recommended bill changes tc committee members. The recommen dations resulted in a bill acceptable tc SHHSC and nursing home owners anc administrators. The Senate passed Ail landmark legislation unanimously Apii 3. On March 6 the Senate passed SE 273 by myself and Rep. Henry Cuellar D-Laredo. SB 273 would require the state comptroller to develop a con sumer guide to assist senior citizen: and their families in making informec choices regarding services such a long-term care, housing, meals am transportation. Legislation that benefits senior enables Texas to meet the criteria fo compassionate government that Sen Hubert Humphrey envisioned whei he said, “The moral test of govern ment is how that government treat those who are ... in the twilight of lift the elderly; and those who are in th shadows of life — Ae sick, the need; and the handicapped." (Judith Zaffirini represents Distric 21 in the Texas Senate.) base of the Popular Front for the Lil eration of Palestine. Homemake humorist Erma Bombeck died in Si Francisco at age 69. Today’s Birthdays: Actor Edd Albert is 89. Violinist Sir Yehu< Menuhin is 81. Singer Glen Campi* is 61. Actor Jack Nicholson is 6 Actor-writer Jason Miller is 58. Cou try singer Cleve Francis is 52. Mov director John Waters is 51. Singer Pet Frampton is 47. Rock singer-musici; Paul Carrack (Mike and the Mechanic Squeeze) is 46. Actor Joseph Bottor is 43. Actor Chris Makepeace is 3 Country singer-musician Heath Wrig (Ricochet) is 30. Rock singcr-mui cian Daniel Johns(Silverchair) is ll Thought for Today: “History is I accumulation of error.” — Norm: Cousins, American editor (1912-199< ;

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