New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, March 28, 1997, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - March 28, 1997, New Braunfels, Texas 4A Q Herald-Zeitung Q Friday, March 28, 1997 p»* Vt '* < *>i. «J V Od U 'tat V* *• Pr,< it* Opinion ■ To talk with Managing Editor Micah Boyd about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, Ext. 220 r QUOTABLE “I do not remember a time when the press was as negative as it is.«. I am now enjoying the best press of my life. And ifs because I am attacking people and being negative.” Barney Frank U.S. representative, 1996 EDITORIAL Kudos (Kudos is a regular feature of the Herald-Zeitung in which readers can recognize the work or support of individuals and organizations in the community. Send your Kudos to: Herald-Zeitung, 707 Landa St., New Braunfels, TX 78130, or fax them to (210) 625-1224). ■ The Community Council of South Central Texas’ Head Start program would like to take this opportunity to thank the good people and community organizations who so generously supported our “Campbell’s Labels for Education” drive. We have just completed our campaign and the total number of labels redeemed was 8,797 labels, lids and UPC proofs of purcliase. The drive proved to be very successful thanks to your help. Items to be received include a microscope and projector, microphones, 9-inch desk globes, rubber balls and lots of activity books. The drive was so successful that we have decided to continue the drive into the ‘97-’98 school year and our goal is to double the almost 9,000 labels obtained this year. If you would like to help support this drive for the next year, please call Bambi Simpson, Parent Involvement/Social Service coordinator, at (210) 379-81 IO for information and a product list. Words on paper cannot express the heartfelt gratitude of the Head Start staff and children for all of the support we received. To our many friends, thanks again; we could not have done it without your support. Head Start staff and children Community Council of South TexasWrite us ... 'I’he New Hraunfeln Herald--Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 260 words. We publish only original mail addressed to the New liruunfel* Herald-Zeitung bearing tile writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please die the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mall letters to; Letters to tile Editor do the New llraunfeh Herald Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 New BraunfelsHerald -Zeitung Editor and Publisher, Ext. 301...........  ...Doug    Toney Managing Editor, Ext, 220....................  Micah    Boyd Classified Advertising Manager, Ext 214...............Karen    Reinmger Business Manager, Ext. 202........................................Mary    Lee    Hall Circulation Director. Ext 228.........    Carol    Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman, Ext 205  ..........  ..............Billy    Parnell Published on Sunday morning* and weekday morning* I ucmtay through Friday by the New Braunfels Herald /sinew (USPS 377-*#)) TW I anda St. or P O IXswer 311328. New Braunfels, Comd County, Tx. 78131 -1328 Penodicsl portage pud by the Mew Braunfels Herald /eiton# in New Braunfels, Texas. Camcr delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three month*, $20 50, six months, $37; one year, $66 Senior Citizen Discuunls by earner delivery only six months, $33; one year, $62. Mail delivery outside Conli C ounty in Texas: three months, $30 30; six months. $55; one year, $103.50. Mail outside Texas: six months, $78; one year, $118.25. Subscribers who have no! recaved a newspaper by 5:30 p m Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 a.m on Sunday may call (210)625-9144 or by 7 p.m. weekdays or by 11 a m. on Sunday. Pos IMAN ult: Send address change* to the New Braudels Herald- Zeitung, PO Drawer 3 ll 328, New Braunfels, Tx. 78131 -1328 Herald-Zeitung Opinion (Min* contact ■ To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the managing editor s address is NBHZeitungOAOL com. Church musicians make a joyful noise Some people remember their Easters by the sermons, by the new clothes they wore or even by the weather. Church choir members remember theirs by the music: the Cincinnati Easter when a junior high musician sang her first Hallelujah Chorus; the Knoxville Easter when a woman played the cello in church for the Hallelujah Chorus — and was glad she wasn’t playing a wind instrument or singing, because the music’s spirit put a lump in her throat and tears in her eyes; the New Braunfels Good Friday service when the music’s sorrow made the singer think of all the sorrow she had ever felt or heard of. And the comfort in that music's beauty made her feel the presence of God as surely as she ever had. That musician has sung in churches in seven states. Each state has been unique, and each church. The church musician fondly remembers the choir directors and accompanists. The Kentucky choir director was one of the most awesome musicians the conservatory-trained singer had ever met. Every rehearsal was a lesson at the feet of a master. The Knoxville choir director, not such an accomplished musician, taught the singer that church music and conservatory music are not the same. Conservatory music is an ail and a craft and work. Conservatory musicians compete Church music is a spiritual journey and a spiritual offering, and should not be thought of as a ‘‘performance.’’ That was a lesson for which the singer will always be grateful. The Knoxville accompanist played the organ and the piano with virtuosi-ty but he also played with a joy and a passion that were direct expressions of his faith and his love of life. His playing was as eloquent as any sermon. The towns and the churches may be different, but the choirs themselves are much the same. The choir members torc the ones who seem to have the most fun in church. They’re the ones most likely to show their true personalities at church, not just their clcaned-up, Sunday-best personas. Somehow the church feels more like home to them. They’re the ones most apt to cry with each other, laugh with each other and hug each other in church. The New Braunfels choir director says some people live their faith by making music. According to “An Encyclopedia of Quotations about Music,” edited by Nat Shapiro, he is in good company. “How greatly did I weep in thy hymns and canticles, deeply moved by the voices of thy sweet-speaking church! The voices flowed into mine ears, and the truth was poured forth into my heart, whence the agitation of my piety overflowed, and my tears ran over, and blessed was I therein." — St. Augustine “Music and religion are as intimately related as poetry and love; the deepest emotions require for their civilized expression the most emotional of the arts.” — Will Durant ‘To some of us the thought of God is like a sort of quiet music played in the background of the mind " — William James “I have no pleasure in any man who despises music. It is no invention of ours; it is the gift of God." — Martin Luther “God hath men who enter Paradise through their flutes and drums." — Mohammed “The Church knew what the Psalmist knew: Music praises God. Music is well or better able to praise Him than the building of the church and all its decoration; it is the Church's greatest ornament." — Igor Stravinsky “Al! true and deeply felt music, whether secular or sacred, has its home on the heights where art and religion dwell." — Albert Schweitzer. ("Susan Flynt England is a columnist for the Herald-Zeitung.) It’s time to send fire ants packing Just thinking about tire ants -those vicious, stinging insect pests that have colonized Texas back yards, pastures and link League fields is enough to make your skin crawl. This pest goes after animals, people, plants and even electrical devices imliscnmmately. It lias been knotvn to destroy air conditioning units And worst of all, according to the texas Department of Health, there were 11 tire ant-related deaths reported in texas from 1980 through 199$, Texas cattle producers alone sustained $67 million of losses due to fire ants last year, while homeowners spent more than $93 million trying to rid their lawns, gardens and houses of this "attack ant" with an attitude. All told, fire ants cost Texans $300 million annually in pesticides, agricul-Today in History The Associated Press Today is Good Friday, March 28, the 87th day of 1997. There arc 278 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight In History: On March 28, 1979, America's worst commercial nuclear accident occurred inside the Unit Two reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pa. On th!* date: In 1797, Nathaniel Bnggs of New Hampshire patented a washing machine. In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia Kay Bailey Hutchison (ural losses, medical bills and utility problems. Nor is there any sign of a reprieve The fire ant popular vi has been pushing steadily westward, now infesting 156 of our state’s 254 counties. Neither record heat nor cold seems to faze them. Texas now is home to more fire ants than their native Brazil. This uninvited guest, which arrived here by way of South Amcnca in the I95(h, needs to be sent packing before it spoils any more picnics, (liven that In 18%, the opera "Andrea Chenier,*’ by Umberto Giordano, premiered in Milan, Italy. In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara In 1939, the Spanish Civil War ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco. In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia Woolf died in Lewes, England. In 1942, during World War ll, British naval forces raided the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazairc. In 1943, composer Sergei Rach-inam miff died in Beverly Hills, Calif. In l%9, the 34th president of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, died in Washington at age 78. In 1982, voters in El Salvador went to the polls for a constituent assembly election that resulted in victory for the the fire ant has no natural predators in Texas, it is up to us humans to turn back the insect tide. Hie countless Texans affected by this plague need both short-term relief and help in finding a long-term solution to the fire am problem. I am co-sponsoring a bill that would set up a national research and management strategy to address both those needs. The legislation would: ■ Establish a National Advisory Board on fire am control, management and eradication. ■ Provide an initial three-year gram of $1 million per year to fund four eradication proposals aa selected by the board ■ Authorize the board to evaluate and select one of the projects as the basis of a national eradication plan. Christian Democrats, led by President Jose Napoleon Duarte. Ten years ago: Maria von Trapp, whose life inspired the Rodgers and Hammcrstcin musical “The Sound of Music," died in Morrisville, Vt, at age 82. Five years ago: Democrats Bill Clinton and Jerry Brown clashed over Brown’s flat-tax proposal, with Clinton charging the plan would hurt the poor, and Brown accusing Clinton of inventing "another big lie." One year ago: Congress passed die line-item veto, giving the president power to cut government spending by scrapping specific programs. The space shuttle Attame artwyyjk* ftd grviHhye to the crew of Russia's space station Mir and then flew away, leaving Shannon Lucid behind for a five-month stay in orbit. We hope to establish this program in cooperation with the State of Texas, which has its own eradication campaign in the works. One Texas legislator has proposed a bill to spend $2.7 million a year in state funds on fire am research. Fire am control — if not eradication — will require a coordinated approach. Isolated programs will only send colonies to adjacent areas. The state and federal government programs must work together. But beat fire ants we will and must. While not quite the stuff of science fiction movies, they’re nasty, nevertheless. (Kay Bailey Hutchison is a U S. senator for Texas.) Today's Birthdays: Actor Dirk Bogarde is 76. Former White House national security adviser Zbigniew Btzezinski is 69. Sen. Frank Murkows-ki, R-Alaska, is 64. Country musician Charlie McCoy is 56. Actress Con-chata Ferrell is 54. Actor Ken Howard is 53. Actress Dianne Wiest is 49 Rhythm-and-blues musician Milan Williams (The Commodores) is 49. Country ringer Rebs McEntire is 42. Rapper Salt (Salt-N-Pepa) is 28. Rapper Mr. Cheeks (Lost Boyz) is 26 Thought for Today: “Humanitarianism needs no apology... Unless we ... feel it toward all men without exception, we shall have lost the chief redeeming force in human history." — Ralph Barton Perry, American author and educator (1876-1957). ;

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