New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 1, 1997, Page 10

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung January 1, 1997

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 1, 1997, New Braunfels, Texas 8A □ Herald-Zeitung g Wednesday, January 1, 1997 Herald Z e i t u n gArts & EntertainmentExhibit uwraps the secrets behind mummies Special to the Herald-Zeitung Unravel the secrets of the past with (ireco-Roman mummies at the Witte Museum as part of Mummies: Unwrapping the Past. The exhibit also includes archaeological artifacts, a recreation of a predynastic burial and Fay yum mummy portraits. The Witte Museum is located at 3801 Broadway in San Antonio. For 3,000 years, mummification was used in Egypt to preserve the dead. Mummies: Unwrapping the Past explores the process of mummification and uses modern science and medicine to analyze the past and solve the puzzles of archaeology. Among the mummification objects on display are a set of canopic jars which were used to contain the stomach, lungs, intestines and liver. An X-ray area in the exhibit enables visitors to see what is under the mummy’s wrapping. The elaborately-wrapped mummy illustrates a specific form of mummification practiced in the Fayyum area, an oasis southwest of Cairo. These woven linen wrappings form an intricate pattern and suggest that she came from a prosperous family. In the 19th century, an autopsy performed on a mummy revealed information but destroyed the mummy. Today, modern medical technology provides methods to examine a mummy without destroying it. In 1995, radiologists and forensic experts from the UT Health Science Center and University Hospital performed X-rays, CAT- scans and needle biopsies to learn more about the mummy’s life and death using non-invasive medical techniques. The results of these tests are revealed in the exhibit. The mummy was originally fitted with a painted portrait of the deceased, since lost. On display are reproductions of Fayyum mummy portraits depicting the faces of the past. Realistic Egyptian portraits of the living were placed on the mummies of the dead. These paintings of men. women and children from the Fayyum area of Egypt may have hung in the homes of their owners prior to death. The ancient Egyptians believed that when a person died they would need after death everything they had needed in life: tools and weapons, objects of adornment, and stone pottery jars containing food and drink. In the exhibit, a recreation of a predynastic burial (4800 to 3100 B.C.) features pottery vessels, weapons and jewelry which would have surrounded the body in a burial in the desert sand. Other areas of the exhibit focus on personal adornment and filmily life. A selection of artifacts on display illustrates objects that were all in daily use, including papyrus, mosaic fragments, amulets, toga clasps and an oil lamp. An adjacent “touch” table features reproduction objects for visitors to examine. Curated by local Egyptologist Charles C. Van Siclen III, Mummies: Unwrapping the Past remains on display permanently at the Witte Museum. Institute of culture needs volunteers Special to the Herald-Zeitung SAN ANTONIO — The Institute of Texan Cultures will start the new year with its Spring 1997 Volunteer Recruitment Campaign, lf you are a Texas history buff and a “people person’’ who would enjoy sharing the story of the Lone Star State with others, then call the Institute’s Volunteer Programs Office at 458-2279 before Jan. 12 to schedule an interview. Applicants must speak English, and bilingual skills (especially Spanish, German or French) are a plus. Openings are available for exhibit tour guides, outreach docents, clerical assistants, library volunteers 40d Back interpreters    mn* Training,,,^ .new includes classroom sessions at the Institute from 9 a rn. to noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday beginning Jan 22 and concluding Feb. 19. “On-the-job” training will follow formal classes. Docents provide support to the paid staff and assist them in achieving the Institute's mandated mission as the state’s educational center for history and culture. Using the multiethnic displays on the Institute’s main Exhibit Floor and the Back 40, docents provide tours emphasizing the ethnic and cultural history of Texas to students and visitors. Docents who perform outreach services take Institute “Tex-Kits” to schools and community groups. Tex-Kits are filled with touchable artifacts relating to Texas history. The kits focus on such diverse areas as folk toys, cowboys, medicine, aviation and holiday traditions. Docents also support research programs, assist in the various other departments of the Institute and perform countless tasks for the annual Texas Folklore Festival in August. “Institute volunteers have the opportunity to sharpen their communication skills, learn more about our wonderful state and share a special camaraderie with fellow volunteers and Institute staff,” said Sally Wiskemann, director of Volunteer Programs. Those completing the training course become members of the Alliance, the organization for Institute volunteers. Alliance members receive invitations to special events and exhibit openings, discounts at the Institute Store, free admission to the main Exhibit Floor, free parking dunng regular business hours and much more. The university of Texas Institute of Texan Culture at San Antonio is an educational center concerned with the history and diverse cultures of Texas. Admission fee is $4 for adults; $2 for children 3-12 and seniors 65 and over; and free for children 2 and under. The Institute is open Tuesdays through Sundays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is located at Bowie Street and Durango Boulevard on HcmisFair Park. Entrance to the Institutes* parking area is now located on Durango Boulevard. Angel flying too close to the ground SWT 1997 Spring Fine Arts Schedule N«w L»n# Cinema John Travolta atari In tho tm# rota of “Michael," a heaven-tint but hell-bent angel, In the Tumor Picture's comedy that was fumed partially In Gruene. The movie Ie currently playing el theaters In Sen Antionio. The Art of the Matter Resolutions: Some risky, but some artistic I can hear you asking, “Aren’t you old enough to quit that silly game of making resolutions?” Older than old enough. But what can I say? I'm addicted to hope. So, even though I gave up certain repeated resolutions several years ago, I confess that hoping for delayed dreams still teases me into attempting their fulfillment. And actually, some reinforcement for that attitude came my way dunng the stressful, surprising, worn-out, wonderful year that’s just walked through history's gates. In a very small book, written by Doug Manning, minister, award-winning newspaper columnist and family counselor, I found words that make me want to keep on “keeping on.” I may have even shared them with you before, lf so, chalk it up to my forgetfulness, then be refreshed by the message, again. Mr. Manning says, “There are two great days in life: the day you were bom and the day you discover why you were bom. ... We are here to become. We are valuable because of what we are, not what we do. Too simplistic for you? Maybe so, but it gives mc the necessary impetus to “become" all the good things I love in others. So I'm going to give in to hope, and make a few resolutions, in spite of the risk involved. Yes, I said “risk." lf you Elizabeth Elliott Guest Columnist don't believe just how risky resolutions can be, you should take a tip from Calvin, that impish cartoon character created by    Bill Watterson. CALVIN S THEORY His stuffed tiger, Hobbes, (who has the remarkable capacity for human speech) asks 6-year-old Calvin if he's made any resolutions for the new year. The usually imaginative youngster declares, “Nope! I want everything to stay the same as it was this year, which was lousy, but at least it’s familiar.” When Hobbes gives him a puzzled look, Calvin explains, “Change is too disruptive! When things are different, you have to think about the change and deal with it. I like things to stay the same, so I can take everything for granted! Besides, the longer I live, the more complicated everything gets. I say let’s stop here, before life gets any harder!” In the next frame ... on second thought, maybe you should ignore Calvin’s fix on resolutions and change. There are already too many people who drag their feet when it comes to new ideas. Go ahead! Take the risk Resolve to he artistic! Now don’t panic. I’m not suggesting that you take up the violin. But filling your ears with the sound of it couldn’t hurt. And you don’t need to put paint to canvass; just resolve to add more color to your life! Put your right-side brain in gear and see what happens That’s the problem-solving side, you know, and if you’re like the rest of us, you have your share of problems to solve. When you let your creative spirit tackle the tough ones, the results can be amazing! And though your vocal range may span four notes, though your feet were not destined for more than walking, though your poetic attempts are limited to limericks, there’s an artist in every one of you! It’s that part of you that dreams of a kinder world, decorating it with “all things bright and beautiful," beginning with your Self. Resolve to become. There is no greater artistry. (Elizabeth Elliott is an arts advocate, writing for the Herald-Zeitung, on the arts and humanities ... and mostly, on being human). Jan. 14 — Opening reception for a faculty exhibition, 5-7 p.m., University Art Gallery. The exhibit will be displayed through Jan. 30. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512) 245-2611 . Jan. 23 — Visiting artist Joan Livingston will speak on fiber art, 11 a.m., Chautauqua Room, LBJ Student Center. Free admission. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512)245-2611. Jan. 24 and 25 — The Southwest Texas State University Opera Workshop presents Opera Goes Southwest: “The Face on the Barroom Floor” and “Johnny Skceky,” 8 p.m., University Performing Arts and Conference Center. Tickets are S5 general adinission, $3 students. For more information, call the Musi? Department at (512) 245-2651. Jan. 29 — Guest artist William Westney, pianist, will perform at 8 p.m. in the Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are 52 general admission, SI for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651 Jan. 31 — Faculty artist Cary Michaels, lyric tenor, will perform at 8 pm. in the UP AAC. Tickets are $2 general admission, SI for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. I — Vocalist Lconore Sergi's studio recital, 8 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 3 — Opening reception for “Echoes: New Works by James Tisdale," 5-7 p.m., University Art Gallery. The exhibit will be ^displayed through noon Feb. 14. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512)245-2611. Feb. 3 — Faculty artist Mary Anne Bruner, cellist, 8 p.m.. Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are $2 general admission, $1 for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 4 — Visiting artist James Tisdale will speak on ceramics, 11 am, Chautauqua Room, LBJ Student Center. Free admission. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512)245-2611. Feb. 8 — Southwest Texas State University Jazz Festival, 5 p.m., Evans Auditorium. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 9 — Vocalist Peggy Brunner’s studio recital, 3 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Admission is free. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. IO — Faculty artist Tim Woolsey, pianist, 8 p.m.. Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are $2 general admission, SI for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 16 — Vocalist Leonore Sergi's studio recital, 3 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are $2 general admission, $1 for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 16 — SWT Jazz Band presents “America’s Great Music — Jazz" as part of the American Music Festival, 8 p.m., UPAAC. Tickets are $2 general admission, $1 for students. For more information, call che Music Department at (512) 245* 2651. Feb. 17 — Guest lecturer Christopher Wilkins, music director for the San Antonio Symphony, will speak on “Music of the Americas from the Americas,” as part of the American Music Festival, IO a m.. TBA. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 17 — Visiting artist Lee Stone will speak cm prim collecting, 11 a.m., Chautauqua Room, LBJ Student Center. Free admission. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512)245-2611. Feb. 17 — SWT Jazz Combo performs for the American Music Festival, noon, LBJ Student Center. Free admission.    For    more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 17 — Opening reception for “No Fuss at All, Women’s Apron Narratives and American Women Printmakers in the Early 20th Century,” 5 to 7 p.m.. University Ait Gallery. The exhibit will be displayed through March 7. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512) 245-2611. Feb. 17 — Music by American Women Composers presented as part of the American Music Festival, 8 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are $2 general admission, $1 for students. For more information, call the , Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 18 — Visiting artist Bonnie Stone will speak on painting, 11 a.m., Chautauqua Room, LBJ Student Center. Free admission. For more information, call the Department of Art and Design at (512)245-2611. Feb. 18 — SWT voice students will perform as part of the American Music Festival, noon. Music Building lobby. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 18 — SWT Wind Ensemble presents "An American Old-Fashioned Sousa Concert” as part of the American Music Festival, 7:30 p.m., Evans Auditorium. Tickets are $5 general admission, $3 for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 19 — SWT choirs perform as part of the American Music Festival, 2 p.m., Music Building lobby. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 19 — Exploring American Opera with Julian Reed of the Austin Lyric Opera will be featured as part of the American Music Festival, 3 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Free admission.    For    more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 19 — Faculty artists Russell Riepe and Timothy Woolsey, pianist, will perform as part of the American Music Festival, 8 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are $2 general admission, $1 for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 20 — SWT music students perform an array of American music as part of the American Music Festival, noon, Music Building lobby. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 21 — Music from SWT’s Electronic Music Computer Lab will be featured as part of the American Music Festival, noon. Music Building lobby. Free admission. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. Feb. 22 — Guest chamber ensemble "Soli” will perform as part of the American Music Festival, 3 p.m., Music Building Recital Hall. Tickets are 12 general admission, SI for students. For more information, call the Music Department at (512) 245-2651. ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: January 1, 1997

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