New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, November 15, 1996, Page 8

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

November 15, 1996

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Issue date: Friday, November 15, 1996

Pages available: 18

Previous edition: Thursday, November 14, 1996

Next edition: Sunday, November 17, 1996

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - November 15, 1996, New Braunfels, Texas 8A □ Herald-Zeitung □ Friday, November 15, 1996 H c r Z e i t u n g Church Life ■ To talk with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about Church Life, call ' 625-9144, ext. 21.Church LifeChildlike behavior is the rule when in the house of God I am on edge. Waiting for the door to open. Waiting for the day to officially begin. For the silence to hide like a frightened child. For solitude to say her goodbyes for the next hours. It is early morning at the church and in a moment we will begin one of the busiest days of the week. Thursday morning is the women's Bible study, and soon the hall will be filled with wee ones carting bags of stuff and ready to play. There is Kyle, a tow-headed tyke known for his high-fives. Tori, his sister, who comes smiling into my office because she knows I have animal crackers. Matthew Paul, whose game is to destroy my magazine rack so his mom feels obliged to pick it up. Andrew, who loves to play the bells (green ones only) with the intensity of an Emmitt Smith touchdown. These, along with IO or so others, will all descend across the hall for kid’s fellowship, while the rest of us attend to the more serious aspects of life. Our church is filled with little ones that live life to the hilt and bring joy to all in the process. What makes a child so free? What mixture of celestial spices do the angels sprinkle on a child at day’s awakening? I’m not sure of any one thing that is the root of a child’s freedom, but this I do know. Every happy child has a depth of unblemished faith in his or her parents. They trust with great freedom. We call it growing up. One of the lessons is to separate from the parent and begin to live life on your own. That means that the pains of life are experienced full force without the bumper of parental protection in front of us. It is what takes the shine off the apple. Dennis Gallaher Guest ColumnDaily Bread But what about the child of God? Is all this growing up necessary? In fact, isn’t growing up the very thing Jesus said not to do? Unless you are converted and come as little children, you will be no means enter the kingdom of heaven. * Don’t get hung up in the religious jargon. “Converted” simply means to change. We need to change and become like children if we are to enter God’s home. His children are always welcome there. Those whose faith is unblemished in their Father’s love and care for them. Those who trust God with great freedom. The telltale sign of adultlike faith is who gets the blame when life goes bad. Do you find yourself blaming God? Is He “in charge” of your life and therefore “is responsible” when life gets bruised? Is part of His “portfolio” greasing the machines? Sounds pretty adult. Anything but childlike. But when a child’s world is broken, he naturally runs to the parent who is closest. No one else will do. There can be no substitutes for the comfort of parental love. And only that will bring the freedom of unblemished trust. There’s a little knock at my door. I’ll bet there is more than one kid when I open it. They will all be smiling and run into my office right over to the cabinet where I hide the animal crackers. The only people who will be embarrassed about their behavior will be the adults who are watching. The little ones know they will be blessed. I know that I will get to be a blessing. Only those who aren’t involved in this relationship will be compelled to play by the rules. Say thank you. Don’t bother the pastor. Let me change your diaper. But the kids and I are going to have a great time. Because they have unblemished faith in me. The shine is still on the apple. And so it should be with God. Here’s some food for thought from the Psalms: In the shadow of Your wings / will make my refuge, until these calamities have passedby. Picture an eagle’s nest high on a mountain. A freak blizzard is trying to blast it off the cliff. The young birds seek shelter under the downy softness of the mother’s wing. They don’t question the weather. They don’t blame the mother because they know instinctively that the mother will not leave no matter how bad the storm. Make your refuge under His wing today. The calamities will pass, but He, your Father, will always remain. That’s childlike faith. And that will put the shine back on your apple. A one-month devotional of Dennis Gallaher’s writings has been locally published. Request a copy by sending $2.50 to Devotional, Freedom Fellowship Church, 330 S. Hackberry St., New Braunfels, Texas 78130. (Dennis Gallaher is pastor of the Freedom Fellowship Church.) Prayers sought for 13-year-old with leukemia By DENISE DZIUK Staff Writer_ Charles Luna, a 13-year old boy battling leukemia, has taken a turn for the worse, and is in intensive care at a San Antonio Hospital, and the family is asking for prayers to help in the boy’s battle. Mario Luna, the boy’s father, said Charley who underwent a transplant earlier this year, became sick arid was admitted to Methodist Hospital on Saturday. Since then, he has developed pneumonia. “All of the sudden, from one day to the next, he just started having shortness of breath,” the father said. Charles has developed a viral Religion Briefs FahraH lays church Is imivpvnwm Mipvit gin LYNCHBURG, Va (AP) - The Rev. Jerry Falwell has given funds to a conservative Southern Baptist group, but says his church retains its independence. Falwell said Wednesday night he is “a Baptist in the South. That is the whole story, the full story and that’s all there is.” During a service before his congregation, Falwell said he didn’t know when he gave a $1,000 contribution to the Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia that the gift earned his 20,000-member Thomas Road Baptist Church church voting rights within the Southern Baptist Convention. Last week, the 40-year-old church sent the first of what will be monthly contributions to the Virginia group, Falwell said. Half the money will go to the convention. Mark DeMoss, a spokesman for Falwell, said the contribution was misinterpreted. “The church maintains its independence and did not join the convention,” he said. The convention does not even have membership, said Bill Merrell, an SBC vice president. The Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia, based in infection, and doctors are not sure what caused it. His father said the doctors have said there is nothing they can do for Charles other than let the virus run its course. Charles is currently on a respirator, which is “helping his body fight.” “Hopefully there’s enough in his immune system to fight this infection,” Mono Luna said. J lf    I To help in his battle, the Luna family is once again asking th&t Charles be remembered in everyone’s prayers. “We’re trying to start up our prayer network again, and we’re asking for more prayers. The doctors have told us the same thing — prayer is very important.” Virginia Beach, was formed last month by Southern Baptists who disapprove of the 173-year-old Baptist General Association of Virginia. They consider the association theologically liberal and hostile to the Southern Baptist Convention. Zimmerman inaugurated aa president of Hebrew college CINCINNATI (AP) — Rabbi Sheldon Zimmerman has been inaugurated as president of Hebrew Union College, a major training center for U.S. rabbis. Zimmerman, 54, was installed recently as leader of the 121-year-old college, a center of Reform Judaism. He has been on the job since January, splitting time between Hebrew Union and Dallas, where he was senior rabbi of Temple Emanu-El. Zimmerman, bom and raised in Toronto, is an I Ith-generation rabbi in his family. He succeeded Alfred Gottschalk, who helped develop the college and ordain its first female rabbis. Gottschalk, who had served as president since 1972, left that job at age 65 and is now the school’s chancellor. Zimmerman has been a rabbi and teacher for 26 years. COMAL COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER 655 LANDA STREET NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 78130 SANTA’S CRAFT SHOW 9*2 Saturday, November 16, 1996 Unusual Christmas Gifts Handmade Creations of Wood* Ceramic, Paintings, Floral**T*shirt8... to Cactus Plants & More! Our Own Ceramics Class will have an open House Try our potato soup or strudel at the snack bar By DONNAL LEHR Special to the Herald-Zeitung Deacon Jim Belding and his wife, Pam, have returned to the Sts. Peter Sc Paul Church “family.” After a 3-year move to Branson, Mo., it’s good to have them back in New Braunfels. Prior to their “call” to Branson, Jim served as deacon at Sts. Peter Sc Paul and in keeping with the duties of this post, presented many inspirational, entertaining, insightful and memorable homilies. Each of the six deacons at Sts. Peter Sc Paul has his individual presentation style, which adds interest and variety to each week's service and speaks to different segments of the population. Once again the family of Sts. Peter Sc Paul can look forward to “Belding” Sunday in addition to an already wonderful menu of “deacon” homilies. Jim has taught many lessons through his homilies by sharing the events in his own life. But when he took his IO years of experience with children’s retreats and conferences at T-Bar-M to one of the largest sports camps for children in the country, he learned a new lesson. During his stay in Branson, working with children from all over the country, Jim kept hearing a cry from families for equal time — Parents who saw what a wonderful experience their children had wanted to be a part of it. Following God's lead, the Behlings returned to New Braunfels and the answer to their prayers for such a ministry. The pieces were coming together for their dream of a family camp. According to Pam, the timing could not have been better due to the arrival of a new granddaughter. Their son and proud new dad, Todd, is a teacher and coach at OakRun Elementary School, while a second son, T.J., who teaches fifth grade in the Dallas area, would like nothing better than to join his family back in New Braunfels during this exciting time. A “heavenly” facility in the Hill Country is the site for this new venture. Situated in Hunt, just eight miles west of Kerrville, the retreat facility, originally called La Junta (the gathering place), has become Deer Creek Family Camp at La Junta. The Behlings have just celebrated their first retreat, which welcomed mothers and sons from 12 families. Focusing on, but not limited to, family retreats, Deer Creek, which will accommodate up to 300 guests, is also available for family reunions, choir trips, couples retreats and more. Scheduled in November, by popular demand, will be a women’s retreat followed closely by one for the gentlemen. The success of the mother/son retreat in October has paved the way for two father/son retreats scheduled for the last two weekends of April. Come summer, Jim and Pam will be taking their camps to higher ground. Backpacking and mountain climbing for eight weeks in Colorado will round out their first year of bringing families closer together! Welcome back, Pam and Deacon Jim! To find out more about the family camps at Deer Creek or to reserve a retreat date, call Jim or Pam Behling at 606-4262. Subscribe Oill IiH.’) IM ll Habitat forming Habitat for Humanity baa mad# progress on the home It Is building at the intersection of Hackberry and Katy streets. The First United Methodist Church of New Braunfels Is sponsoring the house. Habitat for Humanity uses skilled and unskilled people, and all are welcomed to Join in from 5 p.m. until dark on Tuesdays and 7:30 a.m. until dark on Saturdays. For more Information, call Pauline Rector at 029-2006. Above, Charles Mlffleton, Jerry Stringer and Jim Irwin get wood sized and ready for construction. Right, Bart West and Irwin work on the house’s frame. Plans set for German Christmas service The 92nd annual Die Deutsche Weihnachtsfeier, or German Christmas candlelight service, is set for 7:30 p.m. Dec. 8 in the sanctuary of the Central Christian Church on North Main Avenue at Romana Plaza in San Antonio. Bethany Congregational Church and Dr* Annelise Duncan, professor emerita of the Trinity University German program, will conduct the service. The traditional service, conducted entirely in German, will be'led by Duncan and the Rev. Johri U. Culver, pastor of Bethany Congregational Church. Former students of Trinity's German program and Lee and Roosevelt high school students will assist. The German choral arrangements will be sung by the 50-voice allmen's choir, the Beethoven Mannerchor, which was established in 1967. David Nelson will direct the Mannerchor with Shirley Donohue accompanying on the organ. The Kinderchor, or Children's Choir, from the Beethoven Society will be an added feature this year. George Gregory, organist at Central Christian Church, will play the church's hand-operated carillon — the largest manual carillon in Texas — in a half-hour concert of German folk and Christmas songs before the service. The Christmas story will be told through the reading of scripture and German poetry and congregational and choral singing of traditional German carols. In recent years, this service has become an expression of the larger historic German community of San Antonio, attracting visitors from Europe, Canada and Mexico, as well as across the United States. The public is welcome to attend and there is no admission charge. Behlings open camp as religious family retreat ;

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