New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 14, 1996, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

May 14, 1996

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Issue date: Tuesday, May 14, 1996

Pages available: 16

Previous edition: Sunday, May 12, 1996

Next edition: Wednesday, May 15, 1996

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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All text in the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung May 14, 1996, Page 4.

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 14, 1996, New Braunfels, Texas 4 Q HraM-Zrttung a Tuesday, May 14,1996 # ■ To talc with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about the Opinion page, cafl 625-9144, ext. 21“Ethics are what publishers say they are.* — Art Nauman journalist 1994 O R I A LConservation starts hereCity to get tough with water violators as drought continues into summer months As the drought continues, enforcement of the cityfc conservation measures will become stricter, according to Don Ferguson, assistant to die city manager. We applaud any steps to ensure compliance with city regulations concerning water usage. If we can't stick by mandated conservation laws, how can we complain when other communities ignore them? New Braunfels residents are utilizing more surface water than Edwards Aquifer water, something that few communities situated over the aquifer can boast of. But we have permanent, year-round water-use restrictions in place that must be observed. As this drought lingers and lawns turn brown, however, the city reports that many people are violating the water ordinance. Fortunately, residents are calling the municipal building and reporting on the water violators. So fin; the city has issued warnings to those violators, but that may end if weather changes don’t occur soon. Stricter enforcement of the water ordinance will mean significant fines for those caught breaking the watering rules. For those not sure when they can water their lawns, here’s another look at the ordinance^ restrictions: ■No use ofwater sprinklers from IO a.m. to 4 pm on any calendar day ibr either private or commercial property. ■ Hand-held hoses (with a manual or automatic shutoff nozzle), buckets or drip irrigation systems can be used anytime. ■ Non-compliance with the ordinance can result in a misdemeanor offense, and upon conviction, a fine of between $50 and $500 can be ■ Each dayfc violation constitutes a separate offense. lf you haven’t gotten the message yet about conserving water, you may get hit in the pocketbook if you choose to ignore water-use rules. Do the right thing and conserve. Letk not give San Antonio and any other aquifer user an opportunity to say we’re not doing our part to maintain aquifer levels. (Todays editorial was Mitten by Managing Editor Doug Loveday.)Write us... The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcome* letters on any public issue. The editor reserve* the right to correct spelling, style, punctua-tun and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 woads. We publish only original mail addresswrl to the New Braunfels Herald-Zmtung bearing the writers signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Flense cite page mimhr ami of my article that ii mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mall letters toe Letters to the Editor c/o the New Braunfels Herald-ZeUung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78181-1328 Fax: (210) 628-1224 New BraunfelsHerald-Zeitung Editor and Publisher...........................................................Doug    Toney Managing Editor...........................................................Doug    Loveday Retail Advertising Director..............................................Jack Osteen Accounting Manager........................................................Mary    Lee Hal Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman...........................................................Billy    Parnell City Editor.....................................................................Roger    Croteau RMkhedoa Sunday morningi md weekday mornings Tuesday through friday by the NswBna^eUHenld-Ztitunt (USPS 377-880) 707 Lands St, or P.O. Drawer 31132ft, New Bnusfck, Comal County, Tx. 781311328. Second dais pottage paid by die NewBnum-JUm Herold-Zeitmg is New Braunfels. Tom*. Cantar deiivsred ie Comal and Guadalupe countka: three months, $2030; six monde, $37; os* year, S66. Senior Citua* Discount by carrier delivery only: six months, $33; one year. $62. Mail delivery outride Cornel County is Tex**: three months. $30.30; six monte. SSS; os* yew. $103 JO. Mail outride Texas: six months, $7$; one yeir. $11825. Subscribers who heve sot received s Beweeper by 3:30 pm Tuesday through Pridsy or by 7 JO em os Suixtay may call (210) 623-9144 or by 7 pm weekdays or by 11 un PomiAflSR; Send addnas chaoses lo the New Braunfels Heruld-Zeitmg. P O. Draw-31132$. New Braunfels. Tx. 71131-132$. Opinion Onllnfe contact ■ To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the managing editor’s address is DLovedayOAOL.com.Kennedy’s virtue is consistency The senior senator from Massachusetts and thorn in conservative flesh. Edward M. Kennedy, is on a roll. The Boston Globe’s David Shribman wrote last week that Kennedy, ‘'smack in the Age of Conser-vausm, right in die redout cf Republicanism, [is] the man who seems to be in control.” The wont on everybody's bps, writes Shribman, is that “Kennedy is ‘energized.’ He is die talk of die town... Eight of die nine legislative priorities Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle announced this week ane Kennedy bills. And nobody — not his staff, not the gallery regulars, probably not even Strom Thurmond—can remember a Kennedy bill that passed, as the health insurance Nil he wrote with Sen. Nancy Landon Kassebaum did, by a vote of IOO -1.” This is not what Newt Gingrich had in mind for the second year of his “revolution.” And it doesn’t mesh with Bob Dole’s campaign plan for winning the White House. Love him and his priorities or not, Kennedy’s great virtue is his consistency. He doesn’t appear to be something he isn’t He is proud of the “liberal” label. With the exception of abortion (he once made statements that seemed to lean toward pro-life), Kennedy’s views have remained remarkably har monious on capital punishment the environment a federal role in health care, immigration, gun control and programs to fight poverty. For example, on Sept 24, 1970, Kennedy said, “The present environmental movement is neither a fed nor a diversion. Rather, it is part of a long struggle to control the forces of technology, to control the quality of our lives.” He says the same today when debating environmental legislation. On March 12,1974, Kennedy said, “The death penalty is wrong in principle, and it is applied in an arbitrary and unfair manner.” That is about as straightforward as you can get No wiggle room or ambiguities. It’s a position not crafted by a focus group but by conviction. In 19%, he says much the same thing. Kennedy’s greatest strength is his steadfast passion. He wears down the opposition. If he doesn’t win today, he comes back tomorrow. But he doesn’t compromise his principles, even if he must make short-term accommodations in order to move a step ( closer to his ultimate goal. His IOO • I victory on | making health insurance portable came 25 years; after he introduced his first universal health care Nil. ] Kennedy has one major advantage over conserva-j tives. The press never dubs him an “ideologue” or j employs the modifiers “arch” or “ultra” as they do j with conservatives who won’t budge on their prin- j ciples. Kennedy is portrayed as noble for not waver- • ing. When they do the same, conservatives are called• “rigid” and “uncompromising.” Still, even a consistent conservative can overcome the name-calling. Many Americans appreciated Ronald Reagan for his firm stance on important issues. For a similar reason Kennedy is making a comeback — even while a member of the minority party in the Senate— and he just keeps plugging away. In season or out of season, he doesn’t change. As Republicans lick their wounds (many selfinflicted), they should swallow hard and consider this favorite target of political and religious fund-raisers. Ted Kennedy could teach them a tiling or tw< about letting principle drive an agenda, instead o pragmatism, polling and focus groups. (Cal Thomas is a syndicated columnist) Simpson tells Brits he fled because he was hurting By RON KAMPEAS Associated Press Writer LONDON (AP)—OJ. Simpson told British television viewers today he sped away from police in his cst after the killing of his forma wife because he was hurt by others’ suspicions that he murdered ha. “Essentially, I was being attacked for the first time in my life,” said Simpson. “I just wanted the pain to stop.” Simpson, on his first major publicity swing abroad since his October acquittal in the slaying of Nicole Brown Simpson and ha waita friend, was talking on a British chat show. At first, he faced the lightweight husband-and-wife interviewing team on Granada television looking relaxed. But as Richard Madely and Judy Finnigan showed flashes of impatience about his not answering questions directly, Simpson appeared tauter. ‘Not one person has eva said they saw me become violent,” said Simpson. Asked why so many Americans still appeared to be believe he was guilty, Simpson blamed the reporting. “The reports were so, I felt, inaccurate, skewed, always generally to the negative.” Simpson arrived in Britain on Saturday, and has been playing golf and dining out. He’s reportedly also been looking to buy propa-ty near London, a newspaper reported on Sunday. Simpson was looking at sites in Surrey, The Sunday Today In History By The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, May 14, the 135th day of 19%. There are 231 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On May 14,17%, English physician Edward Jenna administered the first vaccination against smallpox to an 8-yea-old boy. Ob this date: In 1443, Louis XIV became King of France at age 4 upon the death of his father, Louis XIII. bi 1787, delegates began gathering in Philadelphia for a convention to draw up the U.S. Constitution. la 1844, the Lewis and Clark expedition to explore the Louisiana Territory left St. Louis. bi 1984, the first Olympic games to be held in the United States opened in St. Louis. bi 1942, the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps was rutahlishrd bi 1948, the independent state of Israel was pro- Telegraph quoted Ns publicist as saying. The area southwest of London, ferried for its minimanors and multi-car garages, is known as the “stockbroker belt.” The forma football star has seen less of the odd mix of revulsion and fascination that surrounds him here than in the United States. Parts of the trial were broadcast here, but some aspects of the case — like Simpson’s earlier conviction for wife battery — remain less well-known. For Britons, unused to seeing court proceedings transmitted on TV, O J. Simpson is a curiosity. And there is a measure of sympathy for him. “OJ. Simpson is, understandably, a sad and disillusioned man,” said an editorial in the left-leaning Guardian newspapa today. ‘The exonerating verdict of 12 of Ns fellow countrymen has been hugely ignored in the rest of America, wNlc the accusatory memoirs of one of his failed prosecutors, Christopha Darden, storm up The New York Tunes bestseller list” Over the weekend, Simpson enjoyed a round of golf with the editor of a golfing magazine. Fans gathered along the course, and he good-naturedly signed autographs. But reporters also followed, and their questions handicapped Ns game. “I don’t have very good form at the moment, and you guys being here doesn’t help,” a smiling Simpson told more than IOO journalists and photographers watching him tee off at the south London golf claimed in Tel Aviv as British rule in Palestine came to an end. In 1955, representatives from eight Communist Noe countries, including the Soviet Union, signed the Warsaw Pact in Poland. In 1973, the United States launched Skylab I, its first manned space station. In 1975, U.S. forces raided the Cambodian island of Koh Tang and recaptured the American merchant ship Mayaguez. AU 40 crew members were released safely by Cambodia, but some 40 U.S. servicemen were killed in the military operation. In 1980, President Carta inaugurated the Department of Health and Human Services. In 1994, the West Bank town of Joicho saw its first full day of Palestinian self-rule following the withdrawal of Israeli troops. Ten years ago: Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev said in a televised address that casualties from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster had risen to tune dead and 299 hospitalized, but said,‘The wont is behind us.” course Sunday. Lata, he dined with Michael Winna, the Britis film director best known for the “Death With series. Golf, dinna with celebrities arid lightweight TV were all part of Simpson’s life before the trial; he has come to Britain patly in an effort to recapture that Ufe. Program-maker Granada TV has denied media reports that it has received death threats. But they acknowledged today that Bo Derek, who was scheduled to appear on the same broadcast as Simpson, pulled out because she does not feel she can appea on the same program as Simpson. Explaining ha unease, Derek called Simpson “the outcast of his (acting) profession back home in the United States.” Arriving Saturday, Simpson acknowledged he was hoping to revive his caroa—but that it was off to a slow start. “I always Uke to make money,” he told reporters. “Unfortunately, I’m not making much here.” On Tuesday, Simpson is to address students at Oxford University — but not before quaffing a few beers with the affable people who run the Oxford Urnon debating society. After Ns speech, he will field students’ questions. T can sympatiiize with his feeling that tile American media has given him a rough ride,” said Paul Kenward, the president of the Union. ‘If he’s aggrieved, he has the right to put it right.” Five years ago: President Bush announced Ns selection of Robert M. Gates to head the Central; Intelligence Agency. Britain’s Queen Elizabeth ll; arrived in Washington to begin a two-week visit to the; United States. One yew ago: Myrtle Evers-Williams was sworn I in to head the NAACP, pledging to lead the civil j rights group away from its recent troubles and restore; it as a political and social force. Today's Birthdays: Opera singa Patrice Munael; is 71. Sea Byron Dotgan, D-ND., is 54. Rock ar$a- J musician Jack Bruce is 53. Movie produca George! Lucas is 52. Actress Francesca Annis is 52. Actress Season Hubley is 45. Rock artist David Byrne ie 44.5 Movie director Robert Zemeckis is 44. Rock singa I lan Astbury is 34. Singa Denny Wood is 27. Thought for Today: “Act weU at the moment, and you have performed a good action to aU eternity”— Johann Kaspa Levator, Swiss theologian (1741-1801). ;

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