New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, February 2, 1996, Page 8

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

February 02, 1996

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Issue date: Friday, February 2, 1996

Pages available: 28

Previous edition: Thursday, February 1, 1996

Next edition: Sunday, February 4, 1996

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - February 2, 1996, New Braunfels, Texas 8 Cl Herald-Zeitung D Friday, February 2,1996WheelsToyota CorollaThe quality of this economical David Sullens Toyota's Corolla, which for 19% has been given redesigned front and rear fascia, three new colors, new wheel covers; revised interior trim and a shortened manual shift lever stroke, is second only to the Camry in U.S. sales and is the second best selling car in the world behind the Volkswagen Beetle. My overall and overwhelming impression of the Corolla, as it has been with any Toyota product I can recall evaluating, was one of quality. And that is not just my opinion. More than three-quarters of all Corollas sold in North America are built at the New United Motor Manufacturing, Inc., plant in Fremont, Calif., or at the Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Canada, facility in Ontario, Canada. And those plants recently received the J.D. Power and Associates Gold Plant and Bronze Plant awards. The Gold Plant award signifies that that plant had the fewest defects per vehicle produced. The Corolla's front end revision involves a simplified, color-keyed grille flanked by smaller headlights. The Toyota emblem is located at the top center of the grille, and is faired into the bodywork. At the rear. Corolla DX models have been given a full wrap-around taillight assembly with a center reflector panel, while Standard grade models are fitted with gray center classing. Both models display the Corolla logo in the center. Available for the first time on any Toyota product is an integrated child safety seat restraint system. Located behind the passengers seat, the center section of the ri^ht rear seat folds forward to reveal a four-point harness with an easy to use latch. Driver- and passenger-side airbags are stan Toyota Corolla DX dard, as arc three-point seatbelts at all outboard seating positions, and child-protector door locks on rear doors (when activated, these prevent the doors' being opened from the inside). Four-wheel anti-lock brakes are available on all models. The Standard Corolla is powered by a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder, twin-cam, 16-valve engine that generates IOO horsepower at 5,600 rpm and IOO pound-feet of torque at 4,400 rpm. The upscale DX model is equipped with a 1.8-liter, four-cylinder, twin-cam, 16-valve family car comes shining through engine that is rated at 105 horsepower at 5,200 rpm and 117 pound-feet of torque at 2,800 rpm. Fuel economy ratings for the DX I evaluated were 27 miles per gallon in town and 34 on the highway. You can opt for either a three-speed automatic transmission or a five-speed manual with the Standard grade Corolla. The DX is available with the five speed or with a four-speed, electronically controlled automatic. The manual Corolla transmission has been revised for '96 for a better feel and more positive gear engagement. It features reduced shifter travel. The Corolla's suspension is fully independent with MacPherson struts at all four comers. All models have a rear stabilizer bar and the DX also has a stabilizer bar at the front. Suspension components are lighter for '96, which reduces unsprung weight and improves vehicle ride comfort and control. Brakes on all Corolla models are ventilated discs at the front and drums at the rear. The Standard grade Corolla has halogen headlights, color-keyed bumpers, 14-inch styled steel wheels with center caps, tinted glass and dual exterior mirrors. It has fully upholstered seats with a new fabric design, full carpeting, a lined trunk, dual cupholder^ a center console storage area and inside releases for hood, trunk and fuel doors. The DX is available as either a sedan or a five-door station wagon. To the Standard grade's equipment list, it adds color-keyed bodyside molding and door handles, and the already mentioned rear trim reflector. Inside, DX models feature upgraded fabric upholstery, 60/40 split folding rear seats with interior locks on the sedan, and fold-up seat cushions on the wagon. The wagon also has a power rear cargo-door lock and both the sedan and the wagon have rear headrests, intermittent windshield wipers, and a digital clock. The Corolla's 36-month/36,000-mile warranty applies to all components other than normal wear and maintenance items. Additional 60-month warranties cover the powertrain for 60,000 miles and corrosion perforation with no mileage limitation. The base price of the DX sedan loaned me for evaluation was $14,708. Optional equipment included color keyed door handles and bodyside molding, $20; color-keyed mudguards, $80; split folding rear seat with integrated child restraint seat, $125; and a $2,587 package that included air conditioning, tilt steering wheel, power windows, door locks and mirrors, AM/FM/Cassette sound system with four speakers, and carpeted floor mats. Destination charges totaled $447, bringing the suggested retail price of the test vehicle to $17,217. (David Sullens. editor and publisher of the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, has written an automotive column for the past 11 years.) Teen Connection receives TCADA grant Feb. 3 luncheon/bridge benefit co-chairs are Cathy Supple, Lunelle Anderson, and Patty Sullivan.■Vi The SWT Presidential Scholarship benefit luncheon/bridge committee includes: (front, I to r) Dorothy Evans, Lunelle Anderson, Anna Villarreal, Patty Sullivan, Cathy Supple; (back, I to r) Ruth Willbern, Flo Hild, Alberta Birk and Brita Northcutt.Plans set for Presidential Scholarship benefit luncheon/bridge Ladies who would like to participate in the Presidential Scholarship benefit luncheon/bridge tournament Feb. 3 may still do so. Please call 512-245-2396 for information. Because it is being held on the Southwest Texas State University campus (eleventh floor of the J.C. Kellam building) on Saturday, there will be ample parking The social hour begins at 11 a.m., luncheon at 12 noon, and for those who wish to stay and compete for prizes, bridge will follow. Those who wish may leave following lunch. C ; The proceeds from the $25 per per-donation will benefit the SWT The Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug abuse recently awarded a grant to Teen Connection that will allow the agency to provide more services to runaway abused and neglected children and their families. Through the grant, Teen Connection will be able to provide children and their families the opportunity to interact with each other in a substance-free environment. Children who are referred to the shelter and their families will be treated alongside each other through counseling and recreational activities. “This is a unique program,” said Kyle Barrington, executive director of Teen Connection. “The idea is for the parents to be taught with their children. The parents learns to be parents and the child learns to be a child.” The grant will allow Teen Connection to purchase a van for the program and to hire nine new staff members. These staff members include one inter vention coordinator to oversee the program, four licensed chemical dependency counselors, tw o recreational therapists and two case aides. The staff will work with the child and the family to provide activities in a supervised setting that will allow family members to interact with each other without the presence of alcohol and drugs. According to Barrington, activities will include non-competitive sports, trips to local parks, bowling, river rafting, trips to the zoo and visits to universities. “As an agency director, 14 m excited that an agency in Comal County was recommended. I am also thankful the state and the taxpayers are willing to support and help runaway abused and neglected kids," said Barrington. Teen Connection will begin training staff members on Feb. I, with services available in April. Highway Department hears local transportation priorities Presidential Scholarship fund for SWT students. Each bridge player may bring her own partner, or partners will be available at the event. Partners will remain together throughout the three rounds of six hands each. Local businesses will provide special door prizes with winners drawn from all those registered. Lunelle Anderson, Patty Sullivan and Cathy Supple are co-chairs of the event. Other members are Dorothy Evans, Alberta Birk, Flo Hild, Brita Northcutt and Ruth Willbem. At a public hearing held Jan. 29 at the city municipal building, Texas Department of Transportation officials heard from city, county and chamber leaders regarding future transportation needs in the area. The completion of the widening project on IH-35 in New Braunfels remained the top priority in every presentation. The meeting focused on projects not only in the 1996-98 Transportation Improvement Plan (T IP) which are projects already funded, but also on projects not in that plan that could be included in the 1999-2000 TIP. Mayor Fraser, representing the city, stated that although there are four IH-35 projects in the 1996-98 TIP, three are for the frontage roads and none of the projects go any farther north than Loop 337 South. Fraser presented TXDOT officials with copies of resolutions received from over thirty area communities as well as a letter he received from' Senator Phil Gramm supporting the completion of IH-35 in New Braunfels.Stammtisch Purple marlin seminar Malcolm Beck from Gardenville will present a purple martin seminar at IO a.m. Saturday, Feb. 3 at Schulz Nursery in Marion. Admission is free and the public is invited to attend and register for the $ 150 purple martin house that will be given away. Creative Memories Creative Memories instructor, Jo Anne Hyatt, can help you preserve your precious family heritage by teaching you how to make safe, meaningful and creative photo albums. The three-evening course includes tips on how to organize your photos, what photo-safe materials you should use, how to start your album, documenting stories, and more. Class begins Thursday, Feb. 8 and meets from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at Mountain Valley Elementary School. Advance registration is necessary. Call 885-7674 extension 301 Fraser also stated that he was pleased to see the Seguin St. railroad underpass project in the current TIP and expressed hopes that the Landa St. underpass project, the #1 needed underpass project in the state, would make it into the 1999-2000 plan. Lastly, Fraser expressed the need for widening State Highway 46 between New Braunfels and Seguin as well as the expansion of SH-46 between FM 2722 and Loop 337. Fraser stated, “Subdivision growth continues in this area at a rapid pace as schools continue to be built and businesses grow. Please give this your earliest consideration for inclusion in the 1999-2000 TIP.” Comal County Judge Carter Casteel agreed with Fraser that the most pressing transportation need in the county remains the completion of the IH-35 widening project. “This road system has seen very heavy use and as we all know traffic volume will continue to grow,” she said. “The sooner the widening project is completed, the better off our entire community and San Valentine benefit Smithson Valley High School freshman varsity tennis player, Nicole Stout, has received final acceptance as a member of the U.S. Tennis Team that will be playing in the Belgium International Tennis Cup this July. There will be a benefit Valentine Dance, Saturday, Feb. IO at the Bulverde Community Center from 8 p.m. to midnight. Tickets are $5, children under 12 are free. Bring your own ice chest with drinks. For tickets, call Denise Stout at 438-3827 or Carla Mann at 980-4042. Valentine ball The third annual KISS Valentine Ball will be held at the Canyon Lake Golf and Country Club in the Woodlands Feb. 3. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7:30 p.m. Music by Monty “Guitar” Tyler. Tickets are $50 per person. Black tie optional. Cash bar available. Call 964-3001 for reserva- Antonio will be.” Casteel introduced Comal County Engineer Tom Homseth to present specific projects of interest to Commissioners Court. Homseth thanked the TXDOT commission staff present for their cooperation over the last five years. “Every project that we’ve been talking about has now made the list and it is very gratifying,” said Homseth. Randy Haugh, chair of the chamber transportation committee, introduced members of his committee to TXDOT staff. Haugh was also thankful for four projects included on IH-35 in the 1996-98 TIP but explained that this would only “get us to the real bottleneck,” which is the section on IH-35 from Loop 337 South to FM 306 on the north side of the city. The chamber late last year requested an audience with the highway commission regarding this issue. TXDOT officials said that this meeting would take place around June of this year. * Other priority projects mentioned were the improvement of a section of tions. Bridal and fashion show Target, 642 S. Walnut Ave. will hold a bridal and fashion show Feb. 3 from I p.m. to 5 p.m. Attention bridge players Seguin Elks Ladies Auxiliary will hold their Winter Bridge Tournament Saturday, Feb. 3 at the Seguin Elks Lodge. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Tournament starts at 9 a.m., with break for lunch, and continues until 4 p.m., when prizes will be awarded. Make check in amount of $10 per player payable to Seguin Elks Ladies Auxiliary and send to: Lola Young, 518 Sunset Drive, Seguin, TX 78155. For information, call 379-4505. Dog obodioncs class The city of New Braunfels Parks and Recreation Department is ofiFer- FM 1102 between Watson Lane and Hoffmann Lane, a connection across the Guadalupe River between FM 725 and SH-46, the rehabilitation of FM 758 from SH-46 and an extension of FM 306 from IH-35 across SH-46 and then across the Guadalupe River to FM 725. In closing, Haugh mentioned a goal of removing traffic from the Walnut Ave. interchange via the extension of Loop 337 from IH-35 along Ruekle Rd. to intersect with FM 1044 near Green Valley Rd. in Guadalupe County. “This interchange has become, since we spoke last, even busier with the H-E-B and Target centers and now the sporting goods store and soon to be another bank as well as the construction of the Wal-Mart superstore,” stated Haugh. TXDOT officials thanked those present and stated that the final 1996-98 TIP and the new 1999-2000 TIP will be presented sometime in September at a meeting in San Antonio. ing a course in basic dog obedience taught by Stephanie Heinrich. The class will meet for eight weeks beginning Feb. 5. Classes will meet Monday evenings from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Landa Recreation Center. The fee is $45. For information, call 608-2167. Arts ensemble The Meridian Arts Ensemble will perform at 7:30 p.m., Feb. 6 in Evans Auditorium on the Southwest Texas State University campus. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students and senior citizens. Tickets go on sale at 5 p.m. the day of the performance at the auditorium box office, for information, call (512) 245-2030. (Submit items to: Herald-Zeitung Stammtisch 707 Landa St. New Braunfels, TX 78130 Or fax to 825-1224 J ;

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