New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, September 10, 1995, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

September 10, 1995

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Issue date: Sunday, September 10, 1995

Pages available: 48

Previous edition: Friday, September 8, 1995

Next edition: Tuesday, September 12, 1995

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - September 10, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas 4 A □ Herald-Zettung a Sunday, September 10 ,1995 Opinion ■ To talk with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, ext 21 H e Z e i t u n g ■ ■ Opinion Online contact ■ To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services a Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the Herald-Zeitung’s address is [email protected] Q U O T A B L E “(The media] are a pest, by the very' nature of that camera in | their hands — Princess Anne British royal. 1986 EDITORIAL It’s their right Participation of Christian Coalition in political process perfectly legitimate There’s a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth these days inside the loop in Washington, D.C The Christian Coalition is holding their annual convention, and word that they plan to be actively involved in the coming presidential election has liberals screaming “foul.” Get real. It seems to me that what really is opposed by liberals is not participation of religious groups, but participation by conservative (evangelical) Christian organizations. Every religious, cultural, gender and race-related organization expresses themselves at the polls and in the media around election time, but let a conservative Christian group do the same, and watch the bashing begin. Liberals support wholeheartedly the political wings of organizations like the Nation of Islam and even B’nai B’rith, but when the Christian Coalition gets involved, people start screaming about the separation of church and state (that’s another editorial in itself) and the inappropriateness of Christians engaged in the American political process. If you could get to the real core of their fears, it’s not the separation of church and state issue but the loss of political power to conservative Christians. This whole debate is about power, and the tactic used by liberals is to scare the populous into thinking that “horrible” conservatives plan to take over the country, destroy citizens’ rights and basically make a mess of things. Baloney. Conservatives have awakened politically, and organizations like the Christian Coalition will not be standing idly by without responding to liberal criticism and misinformation. In our politically correct society, it seems the only folks that can still be bashed without repercussion are conservative Christians. Thank God, that’s finally being challenged. (Today’s editorial was written by Managing Editor Doug Loveday) Write us ... The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters to: Letters to the Editor do the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Fax: (210) 625-1224 New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung Editor and Publisher...........................................................David    Suttons General Manager............................................................Cheryl    Duvall Managing Editor...........................................................Doug    Loveday Advertising Director......................................................Tracy    Stevens Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman...................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager..........................................................Kim    Weitzel City Editor.....................................................................Roger    Croteau Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings T uesday through Fnday by the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (LISPS 377-1180) 7071 anda St, or P.O. Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Comal County, Tx. 78131-1328 Second class postage paid by the New Braunfels Herald fritting in New Braunfels, Texas. Caner delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three months, $19; six months, $34; one yew. $60. Senior Citizen Discounts by earner delivery only: six months, $30; one yea, $36. Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: three months, $28.80; six months, $52; one yea, $97.30. Mail outside Texas: six months, $75; one year, $112.25 Subscribers who have nut received a newspaper by 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday may call (210) 625-9144 or by 7 p.m. weekdays or by 11 a m on Sunday Postmaster: Send address changes to the New Braunfels Herald fritting, P.O. Draw-a 311328, New Braunfels, Tx. 78131-1328Conservatives wary about Dole Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole's front-runner status is in jeopardy. His tie with fellow candidate Sen Phil Gramm in the Iowa straw poll revealed his vulnerability. Despite his mostly conservative senate voting record, especially on abortion. Dole is not full) trusted b> the family values wing of his party. Two recent reports have added to suspicions that Dole is more a process man than one who would not compromise on issues regarded as fundamental by conservatives. A front-page New York Times story quoted Dole as saying he would be satisfied with Colin Powell as a vice presidential choice. He describe Powell as "probably" an economic conservative and a social moderate. .And a front-page W ashington Times story quoted Dole as say ing at a Republican National Committee meeting in Philadelphia last month that he's “willing to be another Ronald Reagan. If that's what you w ant I'll be another Ronald Reagan " The line was viewed as insincere and groveling by some who heard it. Dole is scheduled to deliver a speech in Chicago next week It may be his last opportunity to articulate Cal Thomas a list of firm principles from which he will not deviate. Perhaps he should call it his own contract with, or promise to, America. It worked for House candidates last year. It could work for Dole, especially if he says he was wrong in the past about compromises with Democrats over tax increases. Dole will have to do more, however, than recast himself. He needs to be reincarnated. We need to know what constitutes Dole’s vision for America. George Bush disparaged “the vision thing,” but people want to know where their leader would lead them. Dole must demonstrate that he has the traits of a president, not those of a Senate Majority Leader. There was only one Ronald Reagan. Is there only one Bob Dole, and who is he? Conservatives have come too far over a very long period to settle for an inside-the-Beltway candidate who believes in finessing his opponents, rather than defeating them on ideological grounds. The contest for high office is about a conflict between ideas, some of them irreconcilable. Wily hasn’t liberalism worked. Senator? Do people really want to “reconnect” with their government, as you have promised to help them do, or would they prefer to disconnect from the overpriced, unworkable    programs? Which Cabinet and sub-Cabinet level departments would you eliminate, and why, with no functions transferred to other departments and agencies? Would you work to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts, instead of just cutting its budget as congressional Republicans have done, and why? Would you announce a stepped-up campaign to increase the number of crisis pregnancy centers and adoption options as the best alternative to abortion? And what about your White House staff? Would you name conservatives to the highest posts, including chief of staff, so that you would have people working for you and not against you? Conservatives—the center of the Republican party and of America—want someone of strong convictions who won’t waffle when the heat gets turned up by the liberals, someone with a track record of consistency and dedication to the conservative cause. The Manchester, N.H., Union Leader recently editorialized that Dole is a "man without a message.” His speech next week is an opportunity to prove that he has a message and to link economics to the moral revival of the nation. Revival is not primarily the work of government, though government can stop working against it. Dole should forget the so-called "moderates” in the Republican party. They’re history and their history has done little to win presidential elections. Moderation is the sole virtue of one who believes in nothing substantial. Dole must wake up and smell the conservative coffee. If he doesn’t, he’ll be history, too. (Cal Thomas is a syndicated columnist.) What do you think? r( i Should sanctions be imposed against the French because of their resumption of nuclear testing? Yes No Comments/Explanations. Late last week, the French government sent army troops to Tahiti to put down protests begun following France's decision to begin testing nuclear weapons in the Pacific. France’s decision to resume testing comes in the wake of recent nuclear tests carried out by the Chinese. Both nations have been severely criticized by environmentalists and governments around the world. Some people, however, believe the U.S. should not rule out conducting our own nuclear tests. We want to know what you think. Fill out the coupon (right), drop it by our office at 707 Landa St., New Braunfels , TX 78130 or fax survey to (210) 625-1224. Copied forms are accepted. Deadline for this survey is Saturday, Sept. 16,1995. I - I - I Name Age. Sex I L Address. Phone#_ City_ I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J Write ‘em President of the U.S. Bill Clinton 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington. D.C. 20500 202-456-1414 Vice President of the U.S. Al Gore Old Executive Office Bldg. 17th St. and Pennsylvania NW Washington. D.C. 20501 202-456-2326 U.S. Senators for the state of Texas: Phil Gramm 402 E. Ramsey Rd. San Antonio, TX 78216 512-366-9494 Kay Bailey Hutchison 961 Federal Bldg. 300 E. 8th St. Austin, TX 78703 512-482-5834 U2S. Congressmen: Lamar Smith I IOO NE Loop 410, Ste. 640 San Antonio. TTC 78209 210-821-5024 Frank Tejeda 1313 S E Military Dr., Ste. 115 San Antonio, TX 78214 210-924-7383 The Survey Says... Five responses were received by the Herald-Zeitung to last week’s survey question, “Is growing up in a Spanish-speaking home detrimental to a child’s education?” All five believed that children are at a disadvantage academically if they grow up in a predominantly Spanish-speaking environment. Some of the responses included: ■ lf you live in Mexico City it’s fine, but in this country, English is the national language. Having to re-leam basic communication only slows down the total learning process. ■ After having taught for 35 years, and having observed, my answer is “yes.” The child who can speak English adjusts faster and reads quicker. Comprehension is easier. Also, having parents who can reinforce learning at home is also a key factor. ■ I think Judge Kiser was right to call this child abuse. After all, English is our universal language, and her child should not be deprived of this proper and rightful start in her education. It was obvious that the mother can speak English, and there is no reason why she should not teach her child English first, along with Spanish as secondary. ■ English is the primary language used in the U.S. lf the kids can learn both English and Spanish, OK. But to do well... English should come first. ■ It is good to know one’s heritage: but once that child goes to an English-speaking school, that child must cope with starting school and all that entails, lf he/she cannot speak English, he/she cannot even ask to go to the rest room. I know —* it happened to me. Today In History By The Associated Press Today is Sunday, September IO, the 253rd day of 1995 There are 112 days left in the year.< Today’s Highlight in History: On Sept. IO, 1813, Oliver H Perry sent the message, "We have met the enemy, and they are ours,” after an American naval force defeated the British in the Battle of Lake Ene in the War of 1812. On this date: In 1608, John Smith was elected president of the Jamestown colony council in Virginia. In 1794, America’s first non-denominational college, Blount College — later the University of Tennessee — was chartered. In 1846, Elias Howe of Spencer, Massachusetts, received a patent for his sewing machine. In 1919, New York City welcomed home Gen. John J. Pershing and 25,000 soldiers who had served in the U.S. 1st Division during World War I. In 1939, Canada declared war on Germany. In 1945,50 years ago, Vidkun Quisling was sentenced to death in Norway for collaborating with the Nazis. In 1948, Mildred Gillars, accused of being Nazi wartime radio broadcaster "Axis Sally,” was indicted in Washington D C. for treason. In 1955, "Gunsmoke” premiered on CBS television. In 1963, 20 black students entered public schools in Birmingham, Tuskegee and Mobile, Ala., following a standoff between federal authorities and Gov. George C. Wallace. In 1977, convicted murderer Hamida Djandoubi, a Tunisian immigrant, became the last person to date to be executed by the guillotine in France. In 1979, four Puerto Rican nationalists imprisoned for a 1954 attack on the U.S. House of Representatives and a 1950 attempt on the life of President Truman were granted clemency by President Carter. Ten years ago: In El Salvador, Ines Guadelupe Duarte Duran, the eldest daughter of President Jose Napoleon Duarte, was kidnapped by leftist rebels. She was freed the following month as part of a prisoner exchange. Five years ago: Iran agreed to resume full diplomatic ties with onetime enemy Iraq. Iraqi President Saddam Hussein offered free oil to devel oping nations in a bid to win their support. One year ago: President Clinton, Vice President Al Gore and top national security advisers met at the White House to discuss Haiti, hut made no final decisions. Arantxa Sanchez Vic-ario defeated Steffi Graf to win the U.S. Open women’s championship. Today’s Birthdays: Movie director Robert Wise is 81. Golfer Arnold Palmer is 66. Retired CBS newsman Charles Kuralt is 61. Actor Greg Mullavey is 56. Singer Jose Feliciano is 50. Actress Judy Geeson is 47. Actress Amy Irving is 42. Thought for Today: “If there is no knowledge, there is no understanding. it there is no understanding, there is no knowledge." — The Talmud. ;

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