New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, July 9, 1995, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

July 09, 1995

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Issue date: Sunday, July 9, 1995

Pages available: 44

Previous edition: Friday, July 7, 1995

Next edition: Tuesday, July 11, 1995

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - July 9, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas .jjjJjgrald-Zeltung a Sunday, July 9,1995 Opinion B To talk with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about the Opinion page, call 625-9144 ext. 21 QUOTABLE “I think if you tilt a little bit too for [in covering minority issues), in context ifs not going to be too for, because there’s so for to go.” — Mark Trahant editor, 1994 EDITORIAL Donor shortage Study reveals most families will not allow donation of loved one’s organs Two widely held beliefs in the medical community are being challenged in the wake of an internal medicine study: that health care workers do not regularly ask families to donate the organs of loved ones who are on the verge of dying; and that most American families are willing to donate. The new study found that, indeed, most relatives are not just reluctant to donate but totally unwilling. The reasons for their unwillingness are many. There’s an act of letting go that accompanies a decision to allow for organ donations. People face the truth of the condition of their loved one when they agree to help other patients through donation — and many people are not ready or able to make that decision. But while grievous for many to make, the decision to donate can bring joy and life into the world for others. As medicine continues to find new and innovative ways to save lives, organ transplants will become more routine. The need for donor organs, however, will become more critical. Those needing transplants often spend months and even years on waiting lists. Only the sickest, those in the most need, are placed at the top of the waiting lists. Some have argued that the famous or rich (most recently Micky Mantle) receive special consideration as organ recipients. But the hard reality is that there are not enough organs available — for anyone. The recent study also claims that medical personnel are making the difficult decision to approach relatives about organ donations. Their inquiries are not meant to cause distress or disrespect to grieving relatives. They are just meant to save lives. We should remember that. (Today's editorial was written by Managing Editor Doug Loveday.) Write us The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 260 words. We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters to: Letters to the Editor do The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Fax: (210) 625-1224 New Braunfels Herald -Zeitung Editor and Publisher............................................................David Sultans General Manager............................................................Cheryl Duvall Managing Editor...........................................................Doug Loveday Advertising Director......................................................Tracy    Stevens Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman...................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager........................................................Laura    Cooper City Editor.....................................................................Roger    Croteau rn Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday through Friday by the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (USPS 377-880) 707 Lands Si. or P.O. Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Comal County. Tx. 78131 -1328. Second class postage paid by the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung in New Braunfels. Texas Carrier delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three months. $19; six months, $34; one year, $60 Senior Citizen Discounts by earner delivery only: six months, $30; one year. $56 Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: three months, $28.80; six months, $52; one year. $97.50 Mail outside Texas: six months. $75; one year, $112.23. Subscribers who have not received a newspaper by 5:30 p m. Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 a m on Sunday may call (210) 625-9144 or by 7 p.m. weekdays or by 11 a m on Sunday Postmaster: Send address changes to the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, P O. Drawer 311328. New Braunfels. Tx. 78131-1328 Opinion Onlins contact B To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the Herald-Zeitung’s address is HZeitungCAOL.com.PLO promises haven’t been kept Was it just a coincidence that the assassination attempt on the life of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak occurred the day before talks opened in Washington for the withdrawal of Israeli troops from the Golan Heights? Mubarak is blaming Sudan’s president, but the long arm of Islamic extremism is not limited to borders or leaders. The government of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin is about the business of dismantling what little security Israel has, and the U.S. is helping the process with $500 million in aid to Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) leader Yasser Arafat, apparently without any expectation that he will live up to his promises or that we will hold him accountable for his failure to do so. A fill 1-page ad in the New York Times by the National Council of Young Israel lists some of Arafat’s broken promises. In exchange for the money ($80 million of which has already been sent), Arafat pledged to nullify the PLO Charter calling for the eradication of Israel. He hasn’t. He promised to disarm the five terror organizations operating freely in areas of the West Bank and Gaza under his control. He hasn’t. He repeatedly calls for "jihad,” or holy war, against Israel. And, with one exception, he has Cal Thomas failed to condemn acts of terror in which 187 Israelis have been murdered and more than 500 injured, double the rate before the Oslo “peace” accord. Sen. Al D’ Amato (R.-N.Y.) has introduced a bill to require Arafat to comply with the peace agreement and demonstrate accountability before getting any more American aid. The legislation also requires the PLO to arrest its own members who have murdered 16 Americans. It is a reasonable request, and the measure should be passed. The Clinton Administration is pressuring the army chiefs of Israel and Syria at their meeting out of public gaze at Ft. McNair, Va., to reach a quick agreement on Israeli troop withdrawal from the Golan in less than a year. Among the topics being discussed are what security amusements will replace Israeli occupation. Most talk has centered on a U.S. presence in the region. American forces posted there would make an inviting target for terrorists as they did in the bombing of the American barracks in Beirut in 1983, which killed 241 American soldiers. How can Arafat continue to violate agreements and yet maintain the stature to attract American dollars and negotiators handing him more political victories? Is there a bank—other than the U.S. Treasury and the World Bank—that would continue giving money to someone who regularly defaulted on his word? And what could possibly bis going through the mind of Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, who said recently, “Anyone who wants peace and security will get neither”? Has Prime Minister Rabin become fatalistic when he says, “There was terror before, without the agreement”? Israel has delayed full withdrawal from West Bank cities (set for July I) because of concerns about Arafat’s noncompliance with the peace agreement. And now the U.S. wants to pressure Israel to withdraw from the Golan Heights without any firm guarantees as to what Syrian President Hafez Assad will do. Arafat has always been two-faced. The face he turns toward the West is different from the one he shows in his neighborhood. To the West he seems reasonable and a full diplomatic player. To his people he remains a revolutionary, committed to the destruction of Israel by any means. In January, Arafat addressed the PLO’s annual celebration of “Eruption Day,” the anniversary of the start of its war with Israel 30 years ago. The meeting was in Gaza and he incited his followers to die for Allah. “We are all projects of martyrdom,” he said. “And I say to the martyrs who died, in the name of the martyrs who are still living: We stand by our oath and hold to our commitment...to continue...the revolution." That is the only promise Arafat can be counted on to keep. For that he doesn’t need our money or the bust of the Israelis. Neither will peace be enhanced by a U.S.-brokered withdrawal from the Golan Heights without ironclad assurances from Assad that there will be no more war. (Cal Thomas is a syndicated columnist.) What do you think? A local man was arrested a little more than a week ago at the county courthouse. Strapped to his bicycle, which was parked outside the building, was a loaded AR-15 assault rifle. While no one was injured in the incident, other Texas county courthouses have not been so lucky. Distraught and disturbed men and women have made the civil courtrooms and hallways of a few courthouses their own shooting galleries. In the wake of the recent arrest here, we want to know if you believe security should be tightened at the Comal County Courthouse. RH out the coupon (right), drop It by our office at 707 Lands St., New Braunfels, TX 78130 or fax survey to (210) 625-1224. Copied forms are accepted. Deadline for this survey is Saturday, July 8,1995. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Do you believe the county should beef up security at the courthouse? Yes or No (circle one) Comments/Explanations_ I I I i I I I L Name_ Address. Phone#. City_ Age. Sex Bill would monitor TV violence It is bad enough that television seems to have changed the American child from an irresistible force into an immovable object. But the level of violence in American TV programming makes this attachment to the TV set even more destructive. The average American child witnesses 100,000 acts of violence and 8,000 murders on television before leaving elementary school. It is an indisputable fact that this kind of programming not only monopolizes children’s attention, but has made American youngsters—like oui society as a whole—more cynical, prone to violence and desensitized to its real-life horror. Study after study has shown this to be the case. I believe Americans are fed up with the violence in their streets, schools and on TV. So I have introduced a bill that would provide parents with the kind of information they need to guide their children’s TV viewing habits away from violent programming and toward shows that can entertain kids without corrupting them. This legislation is simple and involves no government censorship. What it would do is fund the preparation and distribution of a “report card” on TV violence, using current research data which is generated by a variety of Today In History By The Associated Press Today is Sunday, July 9, the 190th day of 1995. There are 175 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On July 9, 1850, the 12th president of the United States, Zachary Taylor, died at the White House, having served only one year and four months of his term. Tests performed on Taylor’s exhumed remains in 1991 showed he had died of natural causes — and not poison, as a writer had speculated. On this date: In 1540, England’s King Henry VHI had his 6-month-old marriage to his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves, annulled. Kay Bailey Hutchison universities and private research foundations, as well as the industry itself. It would be even better if this could be accomplished in the private sector. I hope introducing this bill will spur the private sector to make such information available. But, bottom line, parents need help. They could use the information to determine what programming they think is appropriate for their children. Exercising such guidance is, first and foremost, a family matter. I oppose direct government interference with television programming decisions, as do many of my colleagues in Congress. I believe we have as little constitutional authority to tell television programmers what to broadcast as we have to tell newspapers what to publish. But I feel strongly that it is appropriate for government to find ways to help parents use available information effectively so they can make informed programming choices for their children. The bill I have proposed meets In 1755, British Gen. Edward Braddock was mortally wounded as his troops suffered a massive defeat near present-day Pittsburgh during the French and Indian War. One survivor was an aide to Braddock — Col. George Washington. In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud to Washington’s troops in New York. In 1816* Argentina declared independence from Spain. In 1819, sewing-machine inventor Elias Howe was bom iii Spencer, Mass. In 1918, 101 people were killed as an inbound local train collided with an outbound express in Nashville, Tenn. In 1944, during World War II, American forces secured Saipan as the that need in the least intrusive way. We hope the effect of making this information available will be reduced viewership of violent programming, thereby influencing programming content without mandating changes. My bill would authorize the Secretary of Commerce to award a grant to a university or other not-for-profit organization to gather and analyze research into television programming content and publish its findings in an easy-to-read and easy-to-access format four times a year. These TV violence “report cards” would be publicized and made widely available to the public. To the fullest extent possible, parents and consumers should be empowered to choose which television programs they consider appropriate for their children—and to turn off the set when programming they consider too violent is aired. With such information, parents could select programs with themes and ideas which reinforce their family’s values. Given the proper tools, parents can make informed decisions that allow them to take charge of their TV sets. And given the proper tools, I believe they will. (Kay Bailey Hutchison is a U.S. senator from Texas.) last Japanese defenses fell. In 1947, the engagement of Britain’s Princess Elizabeth to Lt. Philip Mount-batten was announced. In 1951, President Truman asked Congress to formally end the state of war between the United States and Germany. In 1982, a Pan Am Boeing 727 crashed in Kenner, La., killing all 146 people aboard and eight people on the ground. In 1986, the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography released the final draft of its 2,000-page report, which linked hard-core porn to sex crimes. Ten years ago: President Reagan’s budget director. David A. Stockman, announced his resignation. Write ‘em U tSi CONGRESSMEN! Lamar Smith 1100 N E. Loop 410, Ste. 640 San Antonio, TX 78209 210-821-5024 Frank Tajada 1313 S.E. Military Dr. .Ste. 115 San Antonio, TX 78214 210-924-7383 FAX: 210-927-6222 TEXAS GOVERNMENT OFFICES Gov. George W. Bush P.O. Box 12428 Austin, TX 78711 512-463-2000 Attomay Qamiral Dan Moral#* P.O. Box 12548 Austin, TX 78711 512-463-2100 Stat# San. Jeff Wentworth 1250 N.E. Loop 410 San Antonio, TX 78209 210-826-7800 FAX: 210-826-0571 or P.O. Box 12068 Austin, TX 78711-2068 512-463-0326 State Son. Judith Zafffirini P.O. Box 627 Laredo, TX 78042 210-722-2293 or P.O. Box 12068 Austin, TX 78711-2068 512-463-0125 FAX: 512-463-0326 State Rep. Edmund Kuempel P.O. Box 911 Seguin, TX 78155-0911 210-379-8732 FAX: 512-463-0904 or P.O. Box 2910 Austin, TX 78768-2910 512-463-0602 FAX: 512-463-5096 COMAL COUNTY GOVERNMENT OFFICII Comal County Courthouse 100 Main Plaza New Braunfels, TX 78130 210-620-5501 ;

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