New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, June 2, 1995, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

June 02, 1995

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Issue date: Friday, June 2, 1995

Pages available: 28

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Next edition: Sunday, June 4, 1995

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 2, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas 4 ■ Herald-Zeitung ■ Friday, June 2,1005 ■ To talk with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, • ext. 21 Opinion I To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the Herald-Zeitung's address is HZeltungOAOL.com. ,;/ t -i ,1 7 4 : 4 4 v 4 ' 4 M A •J* I i “Without freedom, there is no creation, no life, no beauty.” — Tahar Ben Jelloun Moroccan writer, 1993 EDITORIAL Perilous Heights Plan to dismantle Jewish settlements on Golan Heights bad move for Israel The protests have begun in Israel again. Burning tires billow black smoke into the air as protesters hold signs and shout at the top of their lungs. Clashes with the police are inevitable, and television coverage of the event is sure to follow. The difference in this protest, however, is striking. The protest signs are written in Hebrew, and the protesters are Jewish settlers of the Golan Heights. A protest Thursday began after settlers learned their government had already put together plans to dismantle the settlements on the Golan Heights. That action would be taken if Israel does indeed return the captured parcel of highlands to the Syrians in future peace negotiations. The Golan Heights are a strategic piece of ground coveted by military leaders of both Israel and Syria. To return the land would mean moving out Jewish settlers and making vulnerable, once again, the northern portion of the Israel nation. The present sentiment in the Israeli government is that no peace accord with Syria will occur without the return of the Golan Heights. But by giving back that land, Israel will become a more inviting target for its enemies — and there are still very many. Since becoming a nation again in 1948, Israel has fought with her neighbors five times (not including the war in Lebanon in the 1980s). Many Arabs still call for the destruction of Israel and return of their land to the Palestinians. And Jerusalem, the capital of Israel, also continues to be a “burdensome stone” to nations in the Middle East and around the world. With that city (a part of Judea/Samana or The West Bank),under control of the Israelis, many Arabs continue to see war with the Jews as a foregone conclusion. The Israelis should not return any land, especially a territory as strategically important as the Golan Heights. Their very survival depends on it. And as Israel’s closest ally, the United States should support decisions that regard Israel’s security first. (Today’s editorial was written by Managing Editor Doug Loveday.) Write us The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters to: Letters to the Editor do The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Fax: (210) 625-1224 New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung Editor and Publisher............................................................David Sullens General Manager............................................................Cheryl Duvall Managing Editor...........................................................Doug Loveday Advertising Director......................................................Tracy Stevens Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman...................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager...................................................Karen Reininger City Editor.....................................................................Roger Croteau Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday through Friday by the New Hruunfels HeraJd-Zeitung (USHS 377-880) 707 Landa St., or P O Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Comal County, Tx. 78131 -1328. Second elavs postage paid by the New Braunfels Herald Zeituntt in New Braunfels, Texas. Carrier delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: throe months, $19; six months, $34; one year, $60. Senior Citizen Discounts by earner delivery only: six months, $30; one year, $S6. Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: throe months, $28.80; six months, $32; one year, $97.50. Mail outside Texas: six months, $75; one year, $112.25. Subscribers who have not received a newspaper by 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 a m. on Sunday may call (210) 625-9144 or by 7 p.m. weekdays or by 11 a m on Sunday. P< ai mash J*: Send address changes lo the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, P.O. Drawer 311 328. New Braunfels, Tx. 78131 -1328 Volunteers are champs to many Spurs Mania! It’s exciting to be in the playoffs. Everybody’s talking about it and taking sides in this two-Texas team playoff. It is of particular interest to me since my daughter and most of my Houston friends are for the Rockets, and when we watch the games together it is sort of a free-for-all. My daughter can’t understand my switch of loyalty from the Rockets to the Spurs, but after all, I have been living in this area for 9 years now and it makes sense to me. So, you wonder how Spurs basketball fits into the Comal County Senior Citizens’ business. Well, it’s because they are winners, and the workers and volunteers and members of the center are winners too. If you could all see how much gets accomplished around here all the time, you would see they are definitely Number I. Speaking of winners and losers, in Tuesday’s Express-News, the 1995 Legislation update was printed. For those who missed it, I thought it might be of considerable interest to find out results of the session. As the paper put it, “During the 1995 session, many bills fulfilling promises made on the campaign trail successfully maneuvered the tortuous legislative labyrinth to get to the governor. Many more died on the way. The following is a partial list of winners and losers.” * Concealed handguns..................Signed    into law * Medicaid reform..........................On    governor’s desk * Colonias reform............................On    governor’s desk * Change judicial selection..........Died in House * Home equity..................................Died    in House * Opt out of branch banking.......Signed into law * Abolish state treasury   Voters get to decide * Edwards Aquifer..........................One died; one on governor’s desk * State control of Alamo...............Died    in House * Elected city courts........................Died in Senate * Elected VIA board........................On governor’s desk * Recall of VIA board.....................Signed into law * City-county consolidation.........Died in House * Expanded open records.............On governor’s desk * No kids in pickups.......................Died    in    House * Briefings open to public Died in House * Nursing home for Edgewood....Died in House * Elected SAWS board....................Died    in House * Laredo A&M to UT.......................Died    in House * Medical Residency programs in Laredo, Valley, Corpus Marie Dawson Christi....................................................On    governor’s desk * Valley    law school..........................Never    came up * Drunk    at .08 instead of .10 Died in conference * Live Oak sales tax election........Died in conference * Money for UTSA downtown campus..................................................On    gover nor’s desk Governor Bush succeeded in the four major goals he set out for this legislative session, but not with all the details he had wanted: * Tort Reform—done. * Welfare reform—done, but without cap on family size and with freeze on reapplying for benefits * Education reform—done, without private voucher program but with home rule districts and less state control. * Juvenile justice—done, not as many detention beds as sought but with emphasis on paying set consequences for crimes. Another little bit of information which might be invaluable to some readers is the article on cellular phone fraud. There is a fraud called cloning. It is the most popular form of cellular fraud and a method as easy for thieves as standing by the road and pressing a button. The author of the article remarks that cellular telephones are a booming industry. Once, only executive road warriors with expense accounts owned them. Now, plummeting prices have put cellular phones within the reach of busy moms, blue collar workers, and security conscious seniors. But with that convenience, phone fraud has also flourished. It has been estimated that close to $1 billion was lost in 1994 to cellular phone fraud, and although companies don’t make customers pay for fraudulent bills, customers get losses passed on to them in rate increases. It seems that to send calls, a cellular phone electronically announces its presence to the nearest cellular tower. The phone does so by emitting signals that represent its unique electronic serial number (ESN) and mobile identification number (MIN). The phone emits these signals for as long as it is turned on, even when the owner is not making a call. That’s where cloning enters the picture. Goners use an electronic box to capture the phone signals by standing alongside a road or on a highway overpass and pressing a button whenever a car with a cellular phone goes whizzing by. Another small piece of equipment decodes the signals into numbers. The cloner then takes an unprogrammed plain cellular phone, programs your ESN and MIN into it and then has a phone that the system believes belongs to you. Even though the cellular phone industry has been fighting back, some critics say the wake-up call took too long. They counter by listing some of the difficulties. For example, while a $1,500 bill may seem large to a customer, it is cheaper for phone companies to take the loss than to investigate such a bill. I don’t know exactly what we can do about this problem, but I feel that many of you might want to be aware of the situation. I Know I did not realize it existed. Perhaps, we should all be more aware of what goes on around us and, for sure, check those phone bills if you have a cellular phone. Considering the mixture of good news and bad news in my column today, I would like to end on a note of optimism. May we all be as speedy and energetic as the Spurs, as crafty and slow as the politicians, and as clever as the telephone cloners—but, for the seniors here at the center, let’s put it all to good use. • I BULL RIDING CHAMPION/ By The Associated Press Today is Friday, June 2, the 153rd day of 1995. There are 212 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On June 2,1953, Queen Elizabeth II of Britain was crowned in Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI. On this date: In 1851, Maine became the first stale to enact a law prohibiting alcohol. In 1883, the first non-league baseball game to be played under electric lights look place, in Fort Wayne, Ind. In 1886, President Cleveland married Frances Folsom in a White House ceremony. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion while in office.) In 1924, Congress granted U.S. citizenship to all American Indians. In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a degenerative discase, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In 1946, the Italian monarchy was abolished in favor of a republic. In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor I landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface. In 1975, Vice President Nelson Rockefeller said his commission had found no widespread pattern of illegal activities at the Central Intelligence Agency. In 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a Communist country. In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment of televised sessions began. In 1987, President Reagan announced he was nominating economist Alan Greenspan to succeed Paul Volcker as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. Ten years ago: Greek socialists led by Premier Andreas Papandrcou won a decisive victory over conservatives in national elections. Five years ago: On the third day of their Washington summit, President Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev held informal talks at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland. Actor Sir Rex Harrison died in New York at age 82. One year ago: The International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.N. atomic watchdog, reported it could no longer verify the status of North Korea’s nuclear program, prompting the United States to seek economic sanctions. U.S. Congressman Rep. Lamar Smith 1100 N.E. Loop 410, Ste. 640 San Antonio, TX 78209 210-821-5024 Rap. Frank Tejada 1313 S.E. Military Dr., Ste. 115 San Antonio, TX 78214 210-924-7383 FAX: 210-927-6222 Tim Government Qffictt Governor George W. Bush P O. Box 12428 Austin, TX 78711 512-463-2000 Attorney General Dan Morales P.O. Box 12548 Austin, TX 78711 512-463-2100 State Sen. Jeff Wentworth 1250 N.E. Loop 410 San Antonio, TX 78209 210-826-7800 FAX: 210-826-0571 or P.O. Box 12088 Austin, TX 78711-2Q68 512-463-0326 State Ben. Judith Zafflrlni P.O. Box 627 Laredo, TX 78042 210-722-2293 or P.O. Box 12068 Austin, TX 78711-2068 512-463-0125 FAX: 512-463-0326 State Rep. Edmund Kuempel P.O. Box 911 Seguin, TX 78155-0911 210-379-8732 FAX: 512-463-0904 or P.O. Box 2910 Austin, TX 78768-2910 512-463-0602 FAX: 512-463-5896 Coma! County Officei Comal County Courthouse 100 Main Plaza New Braunfels, TX 78130 210-620-5501 FAX: 210-620-5592 County Judge, Carter Casteel 210-620-5501 District Attorney, 22nd Diet., Bill Belmar (New Braunfels) 210-620-5533 County Attorney, Nathan Rheinlander 210-620-6691 Today In History I Who To Call ;

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