New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 26, 1995, Page 6

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

May 26, 1995

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Issue date: Friday, May 26, 1995

Pages available: 32

Previous edition: Thursday, May 25, 1995

Next edition: Sunday, May 28, 1995

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 26, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas ■ Herald-Zeitung ■ Friday, May 26,1906 f(lurch Life To talk with Managing Editor Doug Loveday about Qhurch Life, call 625-9144, ext. 21. Hor. i I cl I Mum u n q Church Life Local church part of ELCA event ft History was made on Sunday, May 2 J, as thousands of Evangelical Lutheran in America members gathered on college campuses, hospital media centers, and in congregations to participate the first nationwide satellite Town leering of the ELCA. St. Paul Lutheran Church of New Braunfels provided kjey leadership in the development of this historical event and hosted one of the meeting places. Entitled, “Focusing on the Future,” this grass-roots effort linked members in a discussion about the future of the 5.2 million-member denomination. r Gathered in over 70 sites in more than 50 of the 65 synods, and in every one of the 9 regions of the ELCA, an optimism and love for the denomination was expressed by caller after caller. “Our unity is in the gospel,” declared one member, “and our task is the spreading of that gospel.” Nearly TOO participants were able to voice their opinions over the nationwide nook-up during the 4-hour teleconference. At times more than 30 callers were on hold, showing the desire of the members to share their thoughts with one another. Nationally known church consultant Lyle Schaller set the stage for the event by noting that the ELCA must St. Paul part of satelite town meeting decide whether it will remain a church of the European tradition, or will finally decide to become an American church. Schaller defined a European church as one for whom order, structure and tradition was of utmost importance. “An American church,” Schaller declared, “is more interested in mission than method.” Schaller saw the use of 20th century technology and the satellite communication employed in the Teleconference as a definite signal that the ELCA wanted to become an American church. Three up-link sites used the talents of professional staff at WHYY in Philadelphia, KENS in San Antonio, and a mobile unit at Grace Lutheran Church in Huntington Beach, Calif., to create a top-flight presentation. John Bachman, main anchor for WHO-TV in Des Moines, Iowa, and host of the ELCA’s video magazine Mosaic, skillfully blended professional television journalism with knowledgeable churchmanship as he urged participants to share their hopes, dreams and concerns regarding their church. Vance Robbins, president of the ELCA’s Lutheran Youth Organiza tion, representing 500,000 youth ages 15-18, issued a plea for the greater inclusion and involvement of youth in the life of congregations, synods and churchwide. Critics of the event feared that the teleconference would become a political forum for the promotion of candidates for bishop of the ELCA. Current presiding Bishop Herbert Chilstrom will not be seeking re-election at the ELCA’s national convention to be held in Minneapolis in August. Not a single name, however, was mentioned during the telecast Instead, participants focused on the desired characteristics they felt were needed for someone to become a successful bishop. Qualities sought in a new bishop included such traits as being a risk taker, strong leader, good listener, accessible, and willing to be vulnerable. Many callers urged that the new bishop should try new approaches to ministry that might not always be successful. As one caller shared: “Let the new bishop try new ideas and if they don’t work, urge the new bishop to seek forgiveness, let forgiveness be granted, and then let’s move on.” Another caller noted: “whoever the new bishop might be, once elected, we need to get behind that person and give him our support.” Leaders of the event were obviously pleased with the successful presentation of the teleconference which went its full four hours without a hitch. Roger Eigenfeld, senior pastor of St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi, Minn., and chair of the ad hoc steering committee which conceived the idea of the teleconference, said, “Today the world has changed for the ELCA. There’s no turning back now.” He noted, “Society changed when the first piece of printed copy came off of Gutenberg’s press. A new way to communicate has been found. The same is true for this teleconference. We heard each other, we saw each other on the television screen, we prayed and sang together. We were thousands of miles apart but we were together in a common desire to move our church forward.” Eigenfeld concluded, “We now know how to gather our membership for intelligent discussion via satellite. We did it once. We can do it again. (This story was submitted by Rev. Charles DeHaven.)Religion briefsAIDS Advocate RtcthfM $100,000 National Health Award COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A South Carolina AIDS advocate has received a $100,000 national health care award for his efforts to expand community services for people with the deadly disease. Peter Lee of Columbia, director of the AIDS Ministry of South Carolina Christian Action Council, recently received the Robert Wood Johnson Community Health Leadership Program Award. “Mr. Lee exemplifies the kind of community health leader we aim to honor with this award,” said Catherine M. Dunham, Community Health Leadership Program director. “He is tenacious, caring and creative in finding ways to reach those not served by the traditional health care system.” Lee’s AIDS Ministry oversees AIDS care teams based in church congregations. The teams, in 40 churches with 500 volunteers across nine denominations, provide support services such as food shopping, transportation and companionship. “They fill needs, other than medical, by providing someone to listen, care and help with the business of liv ing,” said Lee, who used to work at the Department of Health and Environmental Control’s Center for Health Promotion. Lee said he would use the award money to help expand the AIDS Ministry, as well as Creating a “healthy communities” foundation to encourage community leaders to assume responsibility for improving health care.Ntw Auxillary Bishop to Roach Out to All People PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Recalling his final golf lesson, the Rev. Michael Cote said the pro assured him he would go to church the following Sunday if the priest sank a long putt. “I looked up and said, ‘Father, this is your chance’ — and I sank that putt,” laughed Cote, the newly appointed auxiliary bishop of Maine. While his specific duties have not been decided, the 45-year-old Cote said his mission will be to reach out to all people, not just Catholics. “For contemporary people, I think the Christian church has a lot to say,” Cote said. “The hunger for-truth, the hunger for meaning, for human acceptance, divine acceptance, the meaning before death: These are as great in any heart.” n: u en Church Briefs Exploring God’s Kingdom at Vacation Bible School St. John’s Episcopal Church will be holding a Vacation Bible School July 10-14, 9 to 11:45 a.m. for all children in the New Braunfels area. “Exploring God’s Kingdom, An adventure in Prayer'’ will be taught to children ages 4 through (entering) fourth grade. Pre-registration is being held now. Forms are available in the church office, 312 S. Guenther, or call 625-2532 for more information. Each day the children will focus on a different Bible verse, participate in art projects, learn songs in praise of the Lord and enjoy snacks. Summer Service Schedule will begin on May 28. We will cut back to services at 7:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. until Sept. 10. Christian Fest to feature host of music groups More than 20 of the area’s most popular Christian music groups will perform at Schlitter-bahn Waterpark during the 7th annual Chnstian Music Fest on Saturday, June 10. Continuous performances will be held from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Wave Pool stage in the Wavefest section of the park and in the Sur-fenberg section of the park. Headlining the event will be Grammy and Dove award winner Cynthia Clawson who will perform at 4 p.m. at Surfenberg. All types of Christian music will be showcased during Schlitter-bahn’s Christian Music Fest. There will be country music from Clifton Jansky and Faye Yates, Southern Gospel music from the popular quartet Exaltation, and contemporary Chnstian rock presented by Narrow Road, Skan-dalon and Second Chance. For more information, call Schlitterbahn Waterpark & Resorts at 210-625-2351. Bracken UM, Triumphant Lutheran join for Bible schools Bracken United Methodist and Triumphant Lutheran churches are geared up for an unforgettable summer experience. Bracken UMC will be turned into Cornerstone Street, SonTown, USA, where your children will explore their roots and discover ways to get along with their own families while learning about their place in God’s family. Vacation Bible School will be June 5-9, from 9 a.m. to 12 noon for children 4 years old through 6th grade. To register or for more information, call 606-6717. Daily Dread There he goes. First wandering off the path to look at a lizard on a tree. Then stopping to pick up a stick. Then checking the air on his bike tire. Then stopping to throw the stick for his dog. Finally he reaches the chicken coop where his five friendly birds are waiting for breakfast. One in particular always needs a little special attention so he picks her up and carries her around while he greets all the others. After ten minutes of this he is back on the path to the house with the usual number of important other things to do. Now he is at the back door. Joseph, did you feed the chickens? Big baby blues are wide-eyed. “I forgot." Did you collect the eggs? Now it’s almost funny. "Oops,” is all he can manage What have you been doing all this time? I’m showing more sternness which is his cue to Dennis Canaller I don’t know what I’ve been get senous. doing ” And that is the truth. I’m convinced that this kid’s brain is so full of ideas and plans that simple tasks are simply forgotten. Take the daily shoe pilgrimage for example. Joseph, go up to your room and put your shoes and socks on because it’s time to go to school In good faith, he bounds up the staircase to do the simple task. Ten minutes later I’m yelling up the stairs, “Time to go!" The reply? "Just a minute, I have to put on my shoes.” Now there is no telling what distracted him. It could be that he never actually made it all the way up the staircase. It could be that he was rummaging through his pile of dirty clothes looking for his lost treasure from the day before. It could be that he was day-dreaming that he had already put his shoes on. The bottom line? This kid has a tough time staying on track. He’s not real good at “closure.” Now here is my dilemma Proverbs instructs us to Train up a child in the way he should go . Simple enough Until there’s a kid like Joseph who has so many places to go all at the same time. And is happy no matter where he finally winds up. Life to him is an adventure to be fully lived. He is the kind of kid that teachers say things like, “He’s great fun to be around..most of the time.” Or, “Joseph really helps keeps things interesting.” One day when he was three, we were exasperated simply trying to keep up with him. We asked a dear friend who was an early adolescent specialist for her opinion of our little boy. Her assessment was so accurate that I never forgot it. “Joseph," she said, “just has a very big soul!" And so my “big-souled” little boy wanders through life having the grandest of times. Tender, more obedient and kind than most, yet having to turn over every rock he comes to just for the fun of it. So what are your kids, grandkids, nephews, nieces or siblings like? Most likely, they also break the mold in some way or another. And for us who desire to raise up a child in the way he should go the dilemma is really knowing that child well enough to discover the unique path that he is on. It’s interesting to me that God did not include a book in the BMe called “Parenting.” In other words, the diversity of calling, equipping, and temperament doesn’t lend itself to a three -steps-and-a-prayer approach. Instead, we are encouraged to discover the unique path that our children are on and then keep them on course throughout life. Boiled down to a few words, that is really the goal of Christian parenting. And discovering that path takes time and interest. It takes observation and patience. It takes a dedication to the task instead of a prepackaged plan. It takes a parent who is committed to the art of discovery more than to the task of child-rearing. Which means that sometimes I let him daydream the time away. Because I want him to learn to dream big dreams. Oh, sure. He also needs to get the tasks completed and learn to discipline his time. But I think the path for this little one might be different than most. And it’s my prerogative as a parent to think so Because I’ve observed his path. And I have a feeling that is it different than most (Dennis Gallaher is the father of James and Joseph, "the Sons of Thunder," and pastor of Freedom Fellowship Church.) Seafood Buffet We now offer a larger variety on our delicious all-you-can-eat seafood buffet, each Friday 6-10 pm. Adults - $7.99 Seniors - $7.49 Children 12 & under - $3.99 Iou Should See WW I Found! New Braunfels Factory Stores I is a real discovery... 48 stores in all! Its    unbelievable!    We're talking big-time shopping here. They have everything: fashions for the whole family, home accessories, gift ideas and much I* more. Plus, you won't believe the savings: 20% to 70% off regular retail prices! So 155 Hwy 46 S. • New Braunfels * 625-9200 meet me at New Braunfels Factory Stores as soon as you can. Its name brand shopping at factory outlet savings!' NBW ■NAUMPatS On 1-35 ftp Exit 188 in New Braunfels. Mon.-Sat. 9am-9pm, Sun. 10am-6pm. Call 210-620-6806 for a FREE brochure. Factory Stores Introducing Safe Sitter The Best Babysitter is a Safe Sitter! SAFE SITTER is a medically-accurate instruction series that teaches boys and girls ages ll to 13 how to handle emergencies when caring for young children. SAFE SITTERS learn: ‘Basic life-saving techniques ‘Safety precautions to prevent accidents ‘How and when to summon help *Tipe on basic child care SAFE SITTER classes are available through McKenna Hospital on: May 31st and June 1st SfcOOAM to 3:00PM each day A fee of $40.00 covers the two day program. Cell 606-9111 Ext 440 to register. Certified Instructors: Mary Owens, RN. Csllie Jacks, RN. ;

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