New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 21, 1995, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

May 21, 1995

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Issue date: Sunday, May 21, 1995

Pages available: 22

Previous edition: Friday, May 19, 1995

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 21, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas I A ■ HeraJd-Zeitung ■ Sunday, May 21,1995 H e r a I cl - Z O I t Ll ll q >plnlon I To talk with Managing iditor Doug Loveday ibout the Opinion >age, call 625-9144, ixt. 21Opinion OnllM contact * ■ To submit letters and guest columns electronically by way of online services or Internet, or to simply contact staff members, the Herald-Zeitung's address is Q U O T A B L “Ideological differences are no excuse for rudeness.” — Miss Manners (Judith Martin) 1956 E D I T O R I A L Preventing Terror Closure of Pennsylvania Ave. latest Action by government to curb terror J Not many cities in the U.S. can boast of traffic snarls like our cation’s capital. * And on an average day there, more than 13,000 cars whiz past the White House on Pennsylvania Ave. »; But now traffic planners in Washington D.C.’s municipal building Jiave a new headache to contend with — on Saturday, Pennsylvania Ave., for two blocks in front of the President’s residence, closed to Vehicular traffic, permanently, r It’s about time. J The Secret Service and about every other law enforcement agency in this country you can think of has issued warnings in the past about Ihe vulnerability of the White House to a terrorist attack, i The Clintons are very familiar with their own vulnerability at the Stately old mansion. i In the President’s first two and half years in office, he’s had a small feurcraft crash on the White House grounds. I Most recently, a man pulled an automatic rifle from under his overcoat and began spraying the side of the president’s home with bul-ets. * Closing Pennsylvania Ave. to motorists will not deter anyone on loot who has a mind to pull out a gun and begin blasting away at the White House, but it will make it next to impossible for a terrorist with i car bomb to get near enough the White House to destroy the I building. j One glimpse at the damage at the nine-story federal building in ! Oklahoma City should indicate what devastation would be inflicted on the much smaller White House in the event of such an attack. The move to close the historic avenue in Washington D.C. is dismaying to many, but it’s something that probably should have been done years ago. I When terror groups blew up our Marine barracks and U.S. embassy in Beirut, counter-terrorism specialists began to study the vulnerability of targets in this country. Finally, we’ve made it at least more difficult for terrorists to strike at our country’s most famous house. (Today's editorial was written by Managing Editor Doug Loveday:) Write us The New Braunfels Heraid-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctua-• Hon and known factual errors Letters should be kept to 250 words. .: We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfels Herald-; ■ Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone ■.number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. !• Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the ; ■ previous 30 days. !; Mail letters to: ' Letters to the Editor do The New Braunfels Heraid-Zeitung P O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131*1328 Fax (210) 625-1224 i; j_ New BraunfelsHeraid-Zeitung Editor and Publisher...........................................................David Sullens ^General Manager.........................................................Chefyl Duvall p Managing Editor............................................................Doug Loveday i Advertising Director ....................................................Tracy Stevens Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman..................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager...................................................Karen Reinmger Cif/ Editor.................................................................Roger Croteau Published on Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday through Friday by the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (USPS 377-880) 707 Landa St, or PO Drawer 311328. New Braunfels, Comal County, Tx 78131*1328 Second class postage paid by the New Braun /els Herald Zeiiung in New Braunfels, Texas ( ama delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties: three months, $19; xix months. $34; one year, $60 Senior Citizen Discounts by cama delivery only: six months, $30; one year, $56 Mail delivery outside Comal County in Texas: three months, $28 80; six months, $52; one year, $97 50. Mail outside Texas: six months, $75; one year, $112.25. Subscribers who have not received a newspaper by 5:30 p m Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 a.m. on Sunday may call (210) 625*9144 or by 7 p m. weekdays or by 11 a m on Sunday. Pos I'M AYI wi: Send address changes to the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, P.O. Drawer 311 328. New Braunfels. Tx. 78131 -1328Cost of regulations staggering Cal Thomas At Michigan State University on May 5, President Hinton said that you cannot pretend to love your country while hating your government. No, but you can love your country while hating what your government, in the hands of overzealous and power-hungry regulatory zealots, is doing to you. In a new publication from The Heritage Foundation entitled “Red Tape in America,” there is enough material to make anyone except such zealots angry. “The purpose of this book,” writes House Majority Whip Tom DeLay in the foreword, ‘‘is to illustrate how the burden of excessive government regulation affects the average American...This book contains real-life horror stories of individuals who have lost their property or had their businesses harmed because of overzealous government regulators.” Here you’ll read bout John Thorpe, whose plans to build on his own property were thwarted by the Fish and Wildlife Service which demanded to know what steps he had take to preserve the salt marsh harvest mouse. Though Thorpe wanted only to develop mostly on the dry, upland portion of his property, an agency of the U.S. government theorized that when global warming melts the polar icecaps, the Pacific will rise and inundate the habitat of the salt marsh harvest mouse on his lowlands, forcing it to seek refuge on his highlands. For this science fiction theory, Thorpe was denied permission to develop his land. In another section, you can read about an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission attorney who, on being asked about an employer’s obligation under the Americans with Disabilities Act, commented, ‘‘Whether or not a personal assistant would be required for toileting ard eating is going to have to be determined on a case-by-case basis.” Also, there is a regulation that treats children’s teeth as ‘‘toxic waste” with accompanying regulations for their disposal. Does this mean the tooth fairy is required to wear the proper govern ment-regulated gloves and mask when exchanging a tooth for money under a child’s federally approved pillow? There are stories of overzealous IRS agents breaking into people’s homes, handcuffing them and seizing property without a warrant and, in not a few cases, mistakenly. There are stories about intolerable delays and outrageous bureaucratic requirements by the Food and Drug Administration before a drag can be approved. Reading the section on the FDA will help you understand one reason why drag prices are so high. The FOA also conducts raids, closing down businesses and practices it deems violate its regulations. My favorite horror story concerns a decision to ban bear repellent in the form of cayenne pepper spray. In Alaska, people swear that a shot of this bear repellent in the snout stops a 700-pound bear, but the EPA ruled that cayenne pepper spray could not be advertised as a bear repellent because it had not been registered as a pesticide or tested for effectiveness. EPA Region IO worker Lyn Frandsen said there was no scientific proof that the $40 pepper spray stopped charging bears. “We need efficacy data,” he said, talking like a bureaucrat who had never beni in the woods. Sen. Frank Murkowski (R.-Ark.) said, “The EPA admits that the spray is probably safe to eat, if not smell. It seems like you can use it on a dead bear, you can use it on bear stew, but you cannot use it on a live bear if the bear is after you.” The cost of out-of-control regulation is astounding. The EPA alone now has 18,000 staff members and an operating budget of $4.5 billion, quadraple its original size in 1970. Its inflation-adjusted spending has gone up IO times. All citizens pay the regulatory bill. Thomas Hopkins, an economics professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology and former Office of Management and Budget administrator, estimates regulation is costing roughly $400 billion a year, or about $4,000 per household. Other estimates are even higher. On “Meet the Press” on May 7, Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich said, “There is a much deeper fear of Washington than people in Washington realize.” The regulatory book from Heritage shows why that fear, and some of the anger that goes with it, is justified. What do you think? The National Rifle Association has come under serious national scrutiny in the past several weeks after a fund-raising letter distributed by a group leader described federal agents as “jack-booted government thugs". Former President George Bush resigned his membership from the organization following the letter. But the real attack has come from the present Administration, and NRA members are incensed because many believe that some in government are trying to link the Oklahoma City bombing with the NRA. We want to know if you feel the NRA has been unfairly treated in the wake of the bombing and subsequent media fallout. Fill out the coupon (right), drop it by our office at 707 Landa St., New Braunfels, TX 78130 or fax survey to (210) 625-1224. Copied forms are accepted. Deadline for this survey is Saturday, May 27,1995. Do you believe the NRA has boon unfairly treated In recant weeks? Yes or No (circle one) Comments/Explanations_ Name_ Address. Phone#. City_ Age. Sex. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I J Death squads reappear in El Salvador SAN SALVADOR. El Salvador (AP) — With names like "Black Shadow" and “White Hand," a new kind of death squad is creeping back out onto the streets of El Salvador. They use the same tactics employed in the killing of thousands of leftists in the 1980s, hut this time they target suspected common criminals — and many citizens are applauding them. A death-squad group calling itself "Black Shadow” has claimed responsibility for the May 9 killings of four youths, all reputed gang members. Squad members travelling in a van with smoky windows stopped the four on a darkened street in a poor San Salvador suburb, forced them lo lie face down in the street and shot each one once in the head. At least two other groups, calling themselves “White Hand" and the "Transitory Executive Anti-Delinquent Command," in recent months have vowed in communiques distributed to news organizillions to wage war on common criminals, particularly youth gangs. Ihere are no firm government statistics on the number of people killed by the new death squads, but police estimate at least 25 murders by the squads over the past six months. Analysis In communiques and anonymous calls to radio stations, spokesmen for the squads have said they kill suspected criminals to help control the crime wave plaguing this Central American country. Government statistics show there were 1,135 homicides, 6,443 gunshot wounds, 1,876 rapes and 3,484 robberies in El Salvador last year, the types of crimes that are the hallmark the nation’s gangs. The vice minister of Public Security, Hugo Barrera, blamed the inability to control the death squads — and the gangs — on the previous government and on the former guerrillas. He said both failed to prevent "the lack of security that the country faces in the postwar era.” Similar death squads have sprung up over the past year in Honduras, where political death squads also operated during the 1980s. Despite their experience with death squad horrors of the 1980s, ordinary Salvadorans fed up with growing crime are voicing their support for the vigilante attacks on radio shows and in media interviews. They say that the police have done too little to fight the gangs that threaten them and their families, their homes and businesses. And because the squads say they target only criminals, most average citizens don’t fear that they themselves would be targets. “It’s good someone is fighting the criminals and gang members,” said one housewife, Maria Gra-ciela Cuellar, 28. “But on the other hand, these could end up as extermination squads, singling out opposition politicians." Human rights activists fear that the government may somehow be involved in the groups and share the concern that the attacks could turn political. They note that death squads already have made what appear to be political threats against judges, labor unions, teachers associations and former guerrilla fighters. The Catholic Church's legal office last week charged that the squads include members of the Central American country’s defunct security forces, members of paramilitary groups and even current members of the National Civilian Police force. The new squads “could produce a new wave of political violence against the citizenry,” it warned. rToday In History By The Associated Press Today is Sunday, May 21, the 141 si day of 1995. Ihere are 224 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On May 21, 1927, Charles A. Lindbergh landed his "Spirit of St. Louis” near Paris, completing the first solo airplane flight across the Atlantic Ocean. On this date: In 1542, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto died while searching for gold along the Mississippi River. In 1832, the first Democratic National Convention got under way, in Baltimore. In 1840, New Zealand was declared a British colony. In 1881, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross. In 1892, the opera "I Pagliacci,” by Ruggiero Leoncavallo, was first performed, in Milan, Italy. In 1924, 14-year-old Bobby Franks was murdered in a “thrill killing” com mitted by Nathan Leopold Jr. and Richard Loeb, two students at the University of Chicago. In 1941, a German U-boat sank the American freighter SS Robin Moore in the South Atlantic. In 1956, the United States exploded the first airborne hydrogen bomb over Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. In 1959, tile musical “Gypsy,” inspired by the life of stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, opened on Broadway. In 1968, ihe nuclear-powered U.S. submarine Scorpion, with 99 men aboard, was last heard from. (The remains of the sub were later found on the ocean floor 400 miles southwest of the Azores.) In 1979, former San Francisco City Supervisor Dan While was convicted of voluntary manslaughter in die deaths of Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. In 1980, Ensign Jean Marie Butler became the first woman to graduate from a U.S. service academy as she accepted her degree and commission from the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn.The Survey says...Respondents to question divided on support for local militias in our nation Eight readers responded to last week’s survey question “Do you think local militias are good for the country?”, with four supporting the groups and four coming out against them. Some of the responses supporting the militia movement included; • The federal government (ATF) killing kids in Waco was wrong...killing kids in Oklahoma City was wrong. We need a nonviolent government and militia. • Our militia meetings open with prayer, the Pledge of Allegiance and close with a plea to write, call and/or visit local legislators about pending bills. It’s an ongoing history lesson for young and old. • They alert us that something is not right in our country. I would not mind joining one myself if it was integrated — all races. Some of the responses opposed to the movement included; • This group is generally counterproductive to the good order of society. • Militia members are paranoid nuts who should go to Pluto so their bodies can be with their minds — in outer space! • They strive only for change, not solutions, fabricating untruths to support their positions just like politicians and the government. • Especially disturbing is the connection between militias and the white supremacist movement. People who would never support a racist organization are being used to promote the goals of white supremacists. A k ;