New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, February 28, 1995, Page 7

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

February 28, 1995

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Issue date: Tuesday, February 28, 1995

Pages available: 15

Previous edition: Sunday, February 26, 1995

Next edition: Wednesday, March 1, 1995

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - February 28, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas . Page 4A ■ Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1995 Opinion ■To talk with Managing Editor Mark Lyon about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, ext. 21 H e r a I d - Z e i i t ii n g Opinion "It Is harder to kill a whisper than even a shouted calumny." — Mary Stewart. English novelist. 1979 L.................. I T O R I I A L J Cure for boredom Parks Guide is filled with ways to keep kids busy this summer "Mom, I'm bored." How many parents hear that complaint every summer? During the summer break from school children can have trouble filling their days, and parents are subjected to the whining of bored little ones But it doesn’t have to be that way, not in New Braunfels. Armed with the City of New Braunfels Parks and Recreation 1995 Program Guide, the wily parent can find a way to fill the summer with fun and educational activities. Of course, Landa Park has a playground, train, two swimming pools, picnic areas, a free wading pool, paddle boats, fishing, a nature trail, miniature golf and more. But beyond that, the city has provided yet another year filled with special programs for kids. A dozen Nature's Way programs are scheduled for the year. There is also a canoeing program, historical park tours, Discovery Camps, Jr. Ranger Camp, nature hikes, It’s Wild, Wildlife Detective, Animals, Animals, Animals, Creature Features, Children’s Hour, Camp Thunderduck, tennis lessons, punt, pass and kick, concerts in the park, swimming lessons, and much, much more. To get a copy of the guide and start planning your summer now, pick one up at the park's office, I IO Golf Course Road between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or call 608-2160. The guide is free, but the ideas if provides are priceless. (Roger Croteau is city editor of the Herald-7* Hung.)Write us The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the nght to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included Please cite the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters to: Letters to the Editor do The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung PO Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Fax: (210) 625-1224 New BraunfelsHerald -Zeitung Editor and Publisher General Manager Managing Editor Advertising Director Circulation Director Pressroom Foreman Classified Manager City Editor David Sullens Cheryl Duvall Mark Lyon Paul Davis Carol Ann Avery Douglas Brandt Karen Reinmger Roger Croteau Published un Sunday mornings and weekday mornings Tuesday ihrough Today by the New Braunfels Heruld /euunx1 USHS 377 KHO) 707 luanda St. or PO Drawer ii 1328. New Braunfels. C omal County. Tx 78131 -1328 Second class postage |xud by the New Braun feta Herald Zenunff in New Braunfels, Texas ( ama delivaed in Comal and Guadalupe counties three months, SIV, six month*. $34, one year. SAO Senior ( iti/en Discounts by earner delivery only six months. S30. one year $56 Mail delivery outside Cunni County in Texas three months $28 80. six months, $52. one year, $97 50 Mail outside Texas six months. $75, one year, $112 25 Subscnhas who have ax received a newspaper by 5 30 p rn Tuesday through l-rtday or by 7:30 a rn on Sunday may call (210)625-9144 or by 7 p rn weekdays or by 11 a rn on Sunday PusTMAVn 8 Send address changes lo the New Braunfels Herald /enurt#, P O Draw a 311328. New Braunfels, Tx 78131 1328Discover Texas9 literary heritage Craig Hammett In John Graves' classic book, Goodbye to a River, the author tells a story of Comanche warriors. long since resigned to the reservation, who seek a favor of their old friend and nemesis, Charles Goodnight, the famous cattle baron of West Texas. The Comanches request a buffalo, one of a handful the old rancher still keeps on his spread. In his book. Graves writes: “They ran it before them and killed it with arrows and lances in the old way, the way of the arrogant centuries. They sat on their horses and looked down at it for a while, sadly and in silence, and then left it there dead and rode away, and Old Man Goodnight watched them go, sadly too.” In Goodbye to a River, Graves recalls the legends of the pioneers and Comanches, all the while traveling in a canoe with his dog down the Brazos River. He explores the sights, the sounds and the feel of the river, both past and present, afraid that one day this type of journey will not be possible. Now, there is an opportunity to learn more about Texas writers and their works, of various journeys of Texans amid this diverse land. The Southwestern Writer’s Collection at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos has been open only a few years, but a new traveling exhibit will soon be making its way across the state The exhibit, titled “No Traveller Remains Untouched,” is running through April 4 on the top floor of the Albert B. Alkek Library at SWT. It explores the different journeys of our recorded history, from Cabeza de Vaca, the Spanish soldier who wrote of his exploits across the Southwest in 1555 (La Relacion) to Larry McMurtry’s Lonesome Dove, a Pulitzer-Prize winning novel that spawned one of the most popular TV mini-series of all time. Because I never read any stories by Texas authors in school, I didn’t realize they existed until I happened to read an exerpt from Goodbye to River several years ago. Something clicked. I could relate not only to the setting, but to ideas of this book. I do remember reading the classic, Old Yeller by Fred Gipson, but never realized he lived in Mason. In the past few years, I have learned there is an endless supply of stories by Texas authors, and not always about Texas. One can find almost any genre or subject, from Sarah Bird’s depiction of women in the southwest to the rich Hispanic culture told in With His Pistol in His Hand, by Americo Paredes. These stories tell more than the Hollywood depictions of John Wayne (which I enjoy). They tell of a Texas that is changing constantly and how its people adjust to this change. Sadly, many Texas young sters do not know the writings of their own, tales of this land told by its people. In high school, we studied the basics of Chaucer and Shakespeare, great English writers who laid the foundation for many works today. But it was so hard to understand them, and boredom often set in. We studied Mark Twain and William Faulkner, great American, even Southern writers in their own right who brought the settings and the feelings of the South to American homes. But the closest we ever came to Texas was often when our history books mentioned the Alamo in a few paragraphs. And this was not a true literary study of writers and their works, both how and why the write what they do. I realize the major book companies only produce texts that can be transported to many states, and to print many copies of some Texana books may not go over well in Kansas. But I would like to think teachers could encourage their students to read some of these works like those featured at the Writers Collection. They are not that hard to find in bookstores or any library. If you cannot make it to see the Southwestern Writers Collection or see the traveling exhibit, pick up a book by a Texas author some time and discover a world as I did, a world both very new and very familiar. (Craig Hammett is a staff writer for the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. and a native Texan.) Black, Republican, and in the spotlight WASHINGTON (AP) — He’s black, he’s Republican and he doesn’t much care what anyone thinks of that. As racially charged issues explode around him, Rep. J.C. Watts exudes serenity. “I am what I am,” says the 37-year-old Oklahoma freshman. “I reserve the right lo have my own thoughts.” Even before he arrived last month as part of the 73-member freshman class. Watts was well known in GOP circles. He had been a college football star, he had been elected to statewide office and he had seconded George Bush's nomination at the Republican convention in 1992 It was the proverbial meteoric rise lo the top of a party he only joined in 1989. Now he’s in the congressional spotlight, lending credibility to the new Republican majority as it rushes headlong into racially delicate areas such as welfare reform, affirmative action and social program cuts The party’s high-profile catch is a married, churchgoing lather of five, a youth minister, a Special Olympics hoard member, a former quarterback who played Canadian football allerToday in history By The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Feb. 28, the 59th day of 1995 There arc 306 days left in the year Today’s Highlight in History: On Feb. 28, 1854, some 50 slavery opponents met in Ripon, Wis., lo cull lor creation of a new political group A second meeting was held March 20, and by July, the new group was formally known as the Republican Party. On this dale: In 1827, lite first U S railroad chartered to carry passengers and freight, (lie Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Co., wa* incorporated In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard liteAnalysis leading the Oklahoma Sooners to two Orange Bowl victories. Watts was chairman of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, a powerful board that regulates gas. oil and other utilities. He is interested in small business and defense issues and has lobbied hard to save three military installations in his 69 percent Democratic, 83 percent white district. Perhaps inevitably, however. Watts has been pressed into service as a welfare reform spokesman for the national GOP and its huge freshman clays. "You can’t save money, you can’t own properly, there’s no opportunity, the mother can’t marry the lather of the children without being penalized That’s where we are in this system,” Watts summed up recently at a freshman event. Waits supported the GOP repeal last week of an affirmative action program for broadcasters, calling the program well-intended but "gone awry." As for affirmative action in general, he said in an interview, “I guarantee you that it USS Princeton exploded, killing Secretary of Stale Abel P Upshur, Navy Secretary Thomas W Gilmer and several others. In 1849, tile ship California arrived al San Francisco, carrying lite first of the gold seekers In 1861, the Territory of Colorado was organized In 1951, the Senate crime investigating committee headed by Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., issued a preliminary report saying al least fwo major crime syndicates were operating in the United Stales. In 1974, die United States and Egypt reestablished diplomatic relations alter a seven-year break has benefited more white females than it has black males.” Republicans spent last week cutting money from social service programs especially important to poor and low-income Americans. Black lawmakers were apoplectic. By week’s end, Rep. Gary Franks of Connecticut — the only other black Republican in the House — was warning his party against waging “war on the poor." Watts, however, defended the Republican action plan. The saying goes that no one is more zealous than a convert. Walts said he felt GOP stirrings as early as 1980, when he was a college journalism major covering a debate between two Senate candidates. “At dial time I was a die-hard Democrat," Watts told the Republican National Committee last month. "I left the debate totally confused, because I agreed with dial Republican a whole lot more than I did the Democrat.” Watts, his two brothers and his three sisters were brought up in Eufaula, Okla Their mother was a homemaker, their father a minister They were all IXmocrats Walls’ uncle headed the In 1975, more than 40 people were killed in London's Underground when a subway train sped past its final stop and smashed into the end of a tunnel. In 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Clof Palme was shot to death in central Stockholm. In 1993, a gun battle erupted near Waco, Texas, wlien Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents tried lo serve warrants on tile Branch Davidi-ans; four agents and six Davidians were killed as a 51 day standoff began Ten years ago: Ailing Soviet President Konstantin U. Chernenko made his second television appearance in four days as he was shown receiving his credentials from the Russian Oklahoma NAACP for 16 years The new congressman says he was not spared tile downside of being black in America "There is nobody in the KMth Congress that’s been called ‘mg ger' more times than J C Watts,” he said in an interview He recalled the times lie was forced lo sit in the balcony of the local movie theater, and the day his tallier and uncle "raised Cain” al the local pool because black children weren’t allowed to swim there. The experiences that led oilers to become liberals led Watts to become a conservative. But he's not on a mission to win converts, “I ain not concerned with anybody else changing their registration,” he said ‘Tm not in this business lo get other blacks to become Republican.” Nor is Watts planning to join the Congressional Black Caucus, which is completely Democratic except for Franks. He said his absence gives everyone more flexibility “to follow our convictions.” Watts does not rule out a role as a bridge, a voice of reason amid the shouting. Republic's parliament. Five years ago: ’Hie space shuttl Atlantis blasted off from Cap Canaveral, Fla., on a secret mission I place a spy satellite in orbit. One year ago: Two U S. F 16 figh cr jets downed lour Serb warpiant that UN officials said had bombed a amis plant mn by Bosnia’s Muslim-lc government. Lorena Bobbitt wi released from a stale mental hospital I Virginia, five weeks after she w< acquitted by reason of insanity of mu! luting lier husband, John. T oday's Birthdays: Actor Chark Durning is 72. Svetlana Alliluyev daughter of Jose! Stalin, is 69. Act< Cavin MacLeod is 64 ;

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