New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, February 21, 1995, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - February 21, 1995, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4 ■ Tuesday, Feb. 21.1994 Opinion ■ To talk with Managing Editor Mark Lyon about the Opinion page, call 625-9144. ext. 21 H o i a I d - Z e i ■ ■ Opinion Q U O T AB LU _J “The price of freedom is death." - Malcolm X civil rights activist, 1964 editorialsWelfare for all? Has America become too accustomed to holding out its hand for help? The Republican Party poised to take over Congress to offset the liberal flavor of President Bill Clinton back in November, brought forth to the American people a plan called "Contract With America." GOP members who backed the plan even gave specifics, ranging from a deficit reduction plan to term limits. Now that the GOP has taken over the majority in the House and Senate, it is time to see the proof in the pudding. That means GOP members are working to make true their promise of deficit reduction, and the evidence is there in welfare proponents as well as corporate welfare proponents who are holding out their hands and asking "what about us?" Congress should proceed boldly with a plan to bring America back to stability, and leave such frivolous items such as the baseball strike alone. There is a far greater need for their attention and efforts. If there is to be a future for our children, it will be because this Congress, and the next few which follow, have taken the issue of deficit spending and social handouts seriously. America needs to get back to work, both as individuals and as corporations. The American government should lift the label of "untouchable" on many items which cost taxpayers billions of dollars each year. And it should begin this year. (Today's editorial was written by Mark Lyon, managing editor for the Herald-Zeitung.)The Physical Aspects of Treating Depression Nancy Logan, Ph.D Depression is a serious problem, and is not just a deeper sadness as discussed in previous articles Because of this, it must be addressed in a broad was which encompasses the behaviors, the emotions, and the thinking of the person This article will address the physical aspects of treating depression. and future articles will address the other aspects. People “do** depression in different ways, but there are some common ones. It is typical for a depressed person to behave in a depressing manner. Frequently this “looks like” a deep sadness, sleeping in dark rooms and not willing to get up, keeping the curtains closed and the sunshine out of the room, avoiding exercise and remaining as passive as possible, eating fats and/or sweets and avoiding healthy foods, avoiding or chasing off friends or family, avoiding laughter, avoiding comfort, watching soap operas and/or depressing movies, doing poorly at work or school, etc. I do not say this in a critical way, just as a report of some of the typical behaviors of a depressed person. This behavior makes sense, given the list of symptoms previously discussed. The problem is that this lifestyle would be depressing for anyone to live, even if they were not depressed! Imagine a day where you are exhausted in the morning and (maybe) drag yourself out of bed or maybe stay in bed all morning. Eat sugar and fatty foods and stay passive in a dark room except for soap operas. Don't answer the phone. Don’t get exercise or breathe the outside air. Lay around all day so that you are emotionally fatigued but not sleepy at night. Think lots and lots about how bad you are. The lifestyle in itself contributes to the depression! On top of this, some depressed people add alcohol or other drugs, which only heighten the depression. Alcohol is a depressant to the nervous system, so people who drink alcohol are feeding themselves a depressant! People who are depressed need to physically get involved in life-enriching activities. A daily routine of sleeping and waking is essential, although difficult because sleep patterns are frequently disrupted. A person who is having sleep disturbances needs to go to bed at the same time each night, get up at the same time each morning and cease all naps. Develop a calming bedtime routine. Avoid caffeine even if tired, because it disrupts the sleep-wake cycle. Furthermore, many people who drink coffee in the mornings have a midmorning dip as the caffeine wears off. The same is true for sugar highs and lows. Eating a balanced diet, low in processed sugar and fat, helps fight depression. Exercise is essential, even if it is just a walk around the block. Getting outside in the fresh air and walking briskly can sometimes help reduce depression by itself. Exercise daily. Avoid all non-prescription drugs, including alcohol. Remember that alcohol itself is a depressant, not to mention the shame or guilt some people feel about their behavior when under the influence. Furthermore, people are more at risk for self-harm of other harm when under the influence of a non-prescription drug than they are when they are clean and sober. Avoid depressing movies or books or TV shows. Not intending to tread on the toes of soap opera fans, but soaps are depressing in themselves. Nothing good happens or remains good, and people treat each other poorly and disrespectfully. It’s easy to focus on the problems between people rather than solutions. Furthermore, too much passivity (couch potato style) contributes to a depressing lifestyle. Call friends and family and stay involved with them. Let those trusted friends and loved ones care about your pain and avoid pushing them away. There is likely to be a time when you can be a resource to them too. Stay involved in activities. Pray or meditate. Pick up old hobbies such as music or painting or anything creative. Think what used to bring you joy and do as much as you can of that. In short, take care of yourself! Your body needs good nourishment, exercise, mental and physical activity, and creative outlets. Let friends and family provide support and encouragement, and let their love nourish you and soothe your depression. (Dr Logan is a psychologist in private proactice in New Braunfels.)Write us The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung welcomes letters on any public issue. The editor reserves the right to correct spelling, style, punctuation and known factual errors. Letters should be kept to 250 words. We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfels Herald-Zedung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an address and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must be included. Please die the page number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 days. Mail letters toe Letters to the Editor c/o The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Pax: (210) 625-1224 New BraunfelsHerald-Zeitung Editor and Publisher...........................................................David Sullens General Manager...........................................................Cheryl Duvall Managing Editor................................................................Mark Lyon Advertising Director .........................................................Paul Davis Circulation Director..................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman.................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager....................................................Karen Reinmger City Editor..................................................................,. Roger Croteau published ae Sunday mornings and weekday mornings T uetday through Friday by the New Brumfeis Herald Learn* (LISPS 377-880) 707 Landa Si , ar PO Drawer 311328. New Braunfels. Comal County, Tx 78131-1328 Second class pottage paid by the New Brum fell Herald Learn* in New Braunfels. Texas Canter delivered in Comal and Guadalupe counties three months. SIV, six months, $34, one ye*, $60. Semw Dozen Discounts by earner delivery only six months. 130, one year. 136 Mad delivery    Comal County in Texas three months, $28 80, six months, $32; aes yew. $97 30 Mad outside Texas force months. $40. six months, $7$; one yew. $112 25 Subscribers who have not received a newspaper by 5 30 p m Tuesday through Friday or by 7:30 em an Sunday may call <2 IO) 625-9144 by 7pm weekdays or by 11 a.m on Welfare, taxes, term limits, lawsuits: GOP saves hardest for last By JILL LAWRENCE Associated Press Writer PoamATlHt Send address changes to die New Braunfels HeraldZen mg, PO Draw W3II32S. New Braunfels, Tx. 78131-1328 WASHINGTON (AP) — The most complicated, emotional, divisive issues are yet to come, but House Republicans, entering the final 50 days of a 100-day marathon, say they TI deliver the “Contract With America” on time. Never mind pesky Democrats who disagree with the pace and substance of the wide-ranging legislative package, let alone the formidable challenge of getting the measures through the filbuster-prone Senate or past a president sitting ready with a veto pen. “It is imperative that our promise be kept,” says House Majority Leader Dick Armey, R-Texas. The promise, laid out in a campaign-season contract signed by hundreds of candidates, was this: If Republicans took over the House, they would have votes within the first IOO days on poll-tested, highly popular issues ranging from welfare reform and term limits to tax cuts and a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution. Today in history By The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Feb.21, the 52nd day of 1995. There are 313 days left in the year. Thirty years ago, on Feb. 21, 1965, former Black Muslim leader Malcolm X was shot to death by assassins identified as Black Muslims as he was about to address a rally in New York; he was 39 On this date: in 1846, Sarah G. Bagley became the first female telegrapher as she took charge at the newly opened tele- Analysis The House Republican juggernaut started rolling on the very first session of the 104th Congress, with a 14.5-hour day of internal but significant changes in House rules. By the lime lawmakers left for a President’s Day recess late last week, they had recorded 145 roll-call votes. The 103rd Congress had held 35 votes by the same point in 1993. Wednesday marks the midpoint of an opening run notable for the dominant presence of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and the near absence of GOP setbacks. Republican leaders did lose a bid to revive a national missile defense system, they also were unable lo attract enough support for a constitutional requirement for a three-fifths majority to raise income-tax rates. The second half of the self-imposed “Contract” period is bound to be more contentious and less successful than the first. Armey conceded in an interview that there was "lough stuff ahead of graph office in Lowell, Mass. In 1866, Lucy B Hobbs became the first woman lo graduate from a dental scThxiI, the Ohio College of Dental Surgery in Cincinnati. In 1878, the first telephone directory was issued, by the District Telephone Co. of New Haven, Conn. In 1885, the Washington Monument was dedicated. In 1916, the World War I Battle of Verdun began in France In 1925, The New Yorker magazine made its debut. In 1947, Edwin H Land Iii st t us,” hut said he expected the House would pass 80 percent of the contract and that half the campaign manifesto eventually would become law. Whatever its fate, Gingrich is already calling the contract “a great moment in history ... because it’s the most decisive legislative proposal since the New Deal began in 1933." Besides internal reform and a bill applying all federal laws lo Congress, the House lias passed three complete sections ot the contract: —A balanced budget amendment to the Constitution and line-item veto authority for the president Senate approval of die budget amendment is uncertain at this point. Even it it passes, 38 state legislatures must ratify it. The president does not sign constitutional amendments. —A stiff crime bill that replaces crime prevention and police hiring programs enacted last year with $10 billion in block grants to slates and counties. Senate prospects are precarious. and President Clinton is threatening a veto. —A national security hill that reduces U.S. support for U N. peacekeeping and restricts the president’s demonstrated his Polaroid Land camera, which could produce a black-and-white photograph in 60 seconds. In 1972, President Nixon began his historic visit to China. In 1973, Israeli lighter planes shot down a Libyan Airlines jel over the Sinai Desert, killing more than IOO people. In 1975, former Attorney General John N. Mitchell and former While House aides H R Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman were sentenced to 2 1/2 to 8 years in prison for their authority to place U.S. troops under foreign commanders. The Clinton administration says the House bill is an unacceptable infringement upon executive powers, Senate prospects are uncertain. Still to come, in order of appearance; —Regulatory reform. The House this week lakes up a moratorium on most government regulations and a requirement to weigh costs when evaluating the benefit of new regulations. Both the House and Senate already have passed hills making it larder lo impose new, unfunded regulations on states. Negotiators are working out a House-Scnate compromise that Clinton is expected to sign. —Legal reforms, including limits on punitive damage awards. Gingnch says he expects a dif ficult fight because of trial lawyers’ lobbying clout. —A constitutional amendment to limit congressional terms. GOP leaders refuse to speculate on which way the vole will go. “Even if it doesn’t pass, a’s an extraordinary accomplishment to have it be debated,” Armey said. roles in tile Watergate cover-up. Ten years ago: President Reagan held a news conference in which he accused Nicaragua’s leaders of running a cruel and brutal regime "without a decent leg to stand on ” Today's Birthdays: Columnist Erma Boinbeck is 68. Fashion designer Hubert de Givenchy is 68. Former congresswoman Barbara Jordan, D-Texas, is 59. West Virginia Gov. Gaston Capeiton is 55. Tricia Nixon Cox is 49. Country singer Mary Chapin Carpenter is 37. Actor Christopher Atkins is 34. T ;

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