New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, December 8, 1994

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - December 8, 1994, New Braunfels, Texas TAll-District 28-4A Football Team released by district coaches - P.7 50 CENTS COUNTDOWN! 104 DAYS N«w Braunfels Sesquicentennial March 21.1645 New Braunfels 410 Herald -Zeitm MO 16 10/?2'/99 ,icrof.ubl,SHi fc VANDELL DR 188 MG -I PASO, TX 79903- 12 pages in one section ■ Thursday, Dec. 8,1994 Serving Comal County tor more than 142 years ■ Home of DENNIS WILLIAMS ■ Vol. 142, No. 281 Inside By CRAIG HAMMETT - ■    Althein- :::v swrwnwr    v : j»i« I »l|«n»»nilil      I.....HUIHUI   •Bl rn •<>$£ tim Local Congressman wants to cut federal benefits to illegal aliens, except education issue lie Smith, be could be appointed chairman of die ?|r    ;    jlfUiH    kjr: JWtMBS wWOi AIDQDCSQSi MWO also serves on a Criminal Justice Committee, inuiiigratioo is one ana where Texans are obfri-oufuy uwcrwRca Smith will support tighter immigration laws, although he (fid not offer any definite prediction of anything passing the next session of Congress. “lt*s a long process to develop a mqjor piece of legislation,* he said, citing (Scam of hearings and hundreds of experts involved “It takes a gRaflMOialMjUSI genng tnt nets. Smith DCfltionod Ounce ete&s with illegal inwrtgration. A need (br greater border security is one, mainly “reducing the Bomber of illegal attent coming serosa (he border*** Buri th said forty porous of Texas federal prisoners are illegal aliens, SO pertest cf (hose bgdwi of their involve* melt ia (be dreg trade. “Illegal aliens Nu becoming more and more prone to committing ctirnct" he md A programed “Hold the Line” In El Paso has reduced border crossings “substantially** said Smith Smith said there ii also need to reduce feder- ii al benefiti such as wetttte, bousing and unemployment (br illegal aliens. A proposition passed in California would restrict benefits for illegals and their a-jvsvVt** ltirihi<f|pg access to education. Th* preposition has already been challenged in the courts. Smith does not support restricting education, especially since he (bela it has been mandated by the Supreme Court. A third area concerns what Smith terms “easy access to American jobs .” Although Smith admitted some illegal aliens wort jobs that Americans would not, he claims some have many $9-an hour construction jobs that Americans need He said one improvement would allow legal passes for guest workers, especially in the agricul* <-:WagA uUginCSS* Another solution would be to pay higher wages so ™    • AmeriCant WOUld Wailt — f—I- -t- —   a* . a— ♦   • .    . ; those JOOS currently tieing by iriegtM slfens. With the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement, many businesses in Texas ana mum area are looking rorwara to sncreasoa trade with Mexico* Smith said he supports NAFTA and the I ^peroenr increase in trade already seal. He docs not believe any stricter immigration measures on the part of the U3. will affect that agreement ‘‘We're not going to amend NAFTA, both Texas and Mexico are benefiting,” he but added. “Every country has a right to protect ■ A n L , lilt.    lf*X - -- • 4 ^ - - -    -    * sAfc ^ IM    -    - J its t»roea...Don t forget, their policies (on immigration) are stricter than ours ”    * Stcini ni I isch Tho winning numbers 0846) Single-family housing permits skyrocketing ByTECUO J. GARCIA Staff Writer Single family housing sum in New Braunfeli have reached the highest number in 20 yean and could eclipse ti* moat homes built rn one year by the end of the month Builder! purchased 202 angle tam-ily home building permits worth SI,544,315 through November from the city, in 1904, (he year housing per-mits peaked, 214 permits were handed to builder! and developer!. After releasing the Greater New Braunfeli Chamber of Commerce’s economic indicators, chamber vice presider* Michael Meek said the numbers reflect how vital home construction is to the local economy. “Anytime you have heavy con-rtrocuon in angle family homes, dirt is one of the bort multiplying effects you 080 fcve,” he aud “There are so many tr*dc* that are impacted when a home is built.*’ New Braunfels City Manager Mike Shands said home construction brings mort responsibility to the city, but it would be one it would gladly accept. “The belief is that people who are living here would spend their money here,” he said. The economic numbers prove Shands to be right. With the growth in housing. New Braunfels' city sales tax collections have grown at a double digit pace through the tim ten months of 1994. The city collected 17 percent more in sales tax than it did last October and is 13.5 percent ahead of 1993 through the first ten months of 1994 I he city has added $3,266,649 to its coffers in 1994 with the two biggest shopping • months of the year yet to come (statistics are about one month behind). And with low unemployment in New Braunfels and Comal county, in addition to a strong overall economy, local officials have a good economic outlook for the coming months. Shands said in *84, what many consider the “boom” year of the eighties, many area buikteri lost on‘Speculative building”. Homes were built on chance people would like what they saw and buy them. “The big differences from now and ‘84 are that they were speculation hornet,” he said. “Now most are presold and most of these are custom designed. Very few are speculative.” Shands said the price for a new home, including property, in New Braunlfels averages about $85,000. In August the least expensive home built cost $57,000, and the most expense home cost $215,000 to build The city manger added th# homes were built all over the city and not confined to one geographical area. Arctic cold front making push through area From staff reports National Weather Service forecasters said an arctic cold front, presently positioned just west of Comal County, will make its way through the area today, dropping temperatures between IO and 12 degrees. Forecasters said a second arctic front would drop temperatures even lower when It makes its way through the area this weekend. A 30 percent chance of storms and showers exists today and will continue through Friday, NWS officials said. Yesterday, one Herald-Zettung% weather watcher reported a temperature change of 15 degrees as colder air moved into the area. ‘‘The majority of what we get is people who set them off accidently,” he said “There's a minimum of two people who go on these calls. It is an expensive proposition.” Department staff have been accepting about 40 to 50 alarm renewals per day as it is trying to catch alarm owners up. Some residents do not know that they must pay a $24 annual fee if they own an alarm and are within the city limits, McEachem said. The fee attempts to make thing equitable among all citizens as police use their resources to respond to the false alarms The department would like to get all renewals done by Jan. I. Alarm owners will all begin the new year with a ‘‘clean slate” irregardless of how many false alarms they had in the past, should they renew McEachem said The pity will wave the $24 fee for senior citizens and any government entity. “We’re just trying to keep a lid on burgeoning problem,” McEachem said This it just a method to keep the problem under control.” NBISD voters cast 487 early votes From staff reports Final cady voting totals for the New Braunfels Independent School District bond ejection reached 487 as of Tuesday, the final day for early ballets. Officials expected at least that many, given around 400 absentee ballots were cart in trustee elections earlier this year. The $15 million bond package includes a new elementary, new high school library, and repairs andor classroom additions at all but two district campuses. Election lay is Saturday with polit open from 7 am. to 7 p.m. at the New Braunfels ISD Administration building. Mi md R**nylK ISI Obituaries.......................................2 Weather.......................... ................3 Opinion........................... ................4 Class of the Week.......... ................6 Comics............................ ................8 The Marketplace............ ...........9-12 Birthday wishes from the Herald-ZeHtung! The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung extends the following birthday wishes to; Elsie Parades, Hector A Mary Lou Molina (21 years!), Dennis Williams, Brittany Williams (belated), Barbara Tuch, Annie Buch, Jean Davis, Calvin King, Sr., Rosa Maria Fey (1001). This newspaper is 4F9L printed on recycled jMI newsprint SAC to host registration Saturday By TECLO J. QARCU Staff Writer New Braunfels area residents will have a chance to do something San Antonio residents have had the opportunity to do for years—the ability to register for college level classes without driving for miles. San Antonio College will conduct registration for the spring semester at the Comal Independent School District Administration offices from 9-1 p.m. Saturday. “I would say here is your chance to do something you wanted to do but to scared to do it.,” Ray Lewis, a SAC representative, said. “Its a win-win situation, especially for those who work during the day. This is a chance to go to school right here in the evening.** The college will offer ll classes at three different Comal County sites in its first full venture into the area. SAC will have several staff members rt the registration session to help potential students, including financial aid and counseling personnel. Lewis recommends that students arrive as early as possible for the registration. Students never before attending college will have to take a placement test. The results of the test will simply help SAC counselors point students in the right direction as far as classes are concerned, said Lewis. The test takes over sn hour to complete. SAC officials would also ask that students bring their high school or college transcripts. - Lewis said it was too Tate for students to receive financial aid for the spring semester, however, students can still apply, pay their tuition bill, and receive a reimbursement check later if they qualify. The New Braunfels Qty Council gave the nod to a $4,800 SAC needs assessment study lass week that paved the way for the school to meet the academic needs of the New Braunfels area. “Its like a battery chaiger,” he iud about attending ooUege courses. “One of the neatest things is the people and contacts you meet while you are in the college,” Lewis said. Lewis said taking courses will not guarantee a job. “It does teach you about living though,” he sud ‘There are all kind of oounes that come to New Braunfels if these courses are sucoeasftil. Its just a chance for us to expand and offer counts.” I The needs study will determine the courses to be offered in the fotuie. Interested students can call (210) 733-2430 for more information on registration. Donations to H-Z Cheer Fund continue Area citizens have begun to submit donations to the Herald-Zeitung's annual Cheer Fund campaign, which provides food to needy local families for the Christmas holidays. Anyone wishing to donate can do 90 in person by coming by the Hcrald-Zeitung office at 707 Lands St., or call Cheer Fund Director Carol Ann Avery st 625-9144. Volunteers for food delivery are needed, Avery said Anyone wishing to sign up for delivery cm dose by catting Avery. , Today's donations include: ■Glenn ic Ruth Johnson -$25 ■ Stanley St, Viola - $20 ■ Mary Billingsley - $25 ■ W.G. St Gretchen Ryals -$25 ■ WM. Sc Fonda Wetsel -$25 ■ Rita Radosevich - $25 ■ Benedict A Mary Grah-mann-$25 ■ T.C. Brever "Dream A Little Dream Fund" - $50 Women’s shelter to benefit from event A special benefit for the Comal County Women's Shelter will be held Dec. 20 from 8 p.m. to 12 p.m. at Gary's Lands Station on Lands St. A special jam night will be hosted by The Stingrays which will indude several other local musical performers. Cost of admission will be one can of food An auction will be held during the evening with proceeds going to the women's shelter. Harvest from th* Heart on tap Dee. 23 Molly Joe's Inc., will be host to a community "val "Harvest from the Heart," on Dec. 23 at the New Braunfels Civic Center. Some 3,0004,000 people ire expected to be served, said Robert Konkel of Moll y Joe's Catering. Volunteers are needed to help set up the meal on Dec. 23. Lotto Toros 21,40 41,43 48,49 •W" Liffttv False alarms could hit residents in the pocket By TECLO J. GARCIA Staff Writer HrakLZenung photo by MICHAEL DARNALL Tis the season According to local eHergtrt Dr. Frank ll Harry, thta waakand could be on# of th# moat aavara of th# year on •IMW ay Harare aa a arette oold front waa expected to move through the area today, bringing with It sky full of mountain coder po san In addition to tho coder pollen already produced In the Hill Country arca. The "Cedar Fovsr" -ie<un la only days away, although rains and drizzle In the area could help lessen tho offset. Allergy sufferers will know the products pictured above too well. Local merchants say they have restocked their sup-pliea In antldpetion of the "Cedar Fever" season. New Braunfels residents with security alarms that produce more than five false alarms in a calender year will be hit with a class “C” misdemeanor police said Wednesday. New Braunfels Police Sgt. John McEachem said false alum TT-tpwst have over taxed the department, but It could not do anything about it since the city was handling the alarm issue. “There is probably s 99.5 percent false rate on these things for response, which is unacceptably high,” McEachem said. The police sergeant said the roles used by the police department are based on a city ordinance he helped author. The ordinance limits the number of faire alarms to five by any alarm which activates local emergency services. McEachem said it takes close to $60 dollars for police to answer false alarms.For subscription, news or advertising information^ call 625-9144 (Metro 6 -Ll. ;

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