New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 18, 1994 : Front Page

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung May 18, 1994

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 18, 1994, New Braunfels, Texas 410 HOI A 10/22/99    185 SO-WE ST ti J CROP ll Bl.. I. SH INB 2.627 E YANDELL DR WEDNESDAY 284A All-District baseball team announced - See Sports Dd FL PASO, TX 79903-    ^ OO CENTS »/i' COUNTDOWN! 309 DAYS New Braunfels Sesquicentennial March 21,1845 March 21,1995 New Braunfels 20 Pages in two sections ■ Wednesday, MayHerald-Zeitung iy 18,1994    Serving    Comal    County    for    more    than    142    years    ■    Home    of    TRAVIS    HOWARD,    JR. I Vol. 142, No. 134 Inside Weather........................................2A Opinion.........................................4A .otters to the editor......................SA Sports Day............................10-11A busine!.........................................1B The Marketplace.......................3-8B Siammtisch Birthday wlihsi from tho Harald-Zaltuitgl The New Braunfels Herald'-Zeitung extends the following nthday wishes to; Travis Howard, Jr, April Hoffmann, Adam Schwab, Norma Schneider, Frank Sauced*, Jr., Jessica Fernandes, Johnny Fernandez, Roberta Gonzales Searka, Matthew Oakes, Gas Mean, Norma Schneider, Juanita Armstrong, Bertha Kelpie, Betty King, Agnes Lehmann, Joan Saladay, Frank Strdghtoff, Bobbye Jo Streighoff, David McCauley, Curtis Nolle, ■ own mooting pionnoa for tonight at Lone Star Klamantary cafatarta Mayor Protein Ambroao “Butch” Benitez and County Commissioner Cristina Zamora will hold a town meeting tonight at 7 pm. at the Lone Star Elementary cafeteria. The meeting will feature several topics including Eikel Field and its Alture development, Neighborhood Watch, and the recent appraisals sent by the county appraisal district. The Eikel Field Board is seeking citizen input on what is needed to improve Eikel Field. Comal County Commissioner Cristina Zamora mid she appointed a board to study Alture use of the field “They have worked all year trying to develop something, what we're going to do,** she said Cheryl Scott, a representative of Safe Qty, will discuss how to set up a Neighborhood Watch program Also invited will be a representative of the Comal County Appraisal Dutrict to answer questions regarding sharp increases in values Av residents in the weft aide, Zamora said. Home owners have until May 31 to file a protest with the appraisal district. Property owners may protest to the Appraisal Review Board Many taxpayers are able to resolve their case through informal meetings with an appraiser at the district office. “Hopefully, the people will come. These are three important things,” said Zamora. Angelic Festival planned By IPU May 28,29 et El Janfin The Inner Peace Movement will sponsor an Angelic Festival, a psychic fair on Saturday, May 29 from I p.m. to S p.m. and Sunday, May 29 from I p m to 4 p.m. at the El Jaidin Conference Center, 1346 Hueco Springs Loop Road, two and one-half miles from Hwy. 46, west of New Braunfels. Cost of admission is $15 which included three readings Those in attendance will receive spiritual messages from trained psychics. For more information, call 625-4361 or 1-800-336-8008. The public is welcome. Stammttodi (The New Braunfels Herald Zeitung invites its readers lo submit items to SiammtiscH. According lo the Sophienburg Archives end members of the German community, ",Siammtisch" represents a sitting place for members cf the community to gather and share the day's happenings. We invite you to share with us.) Improvement seen in NE TAAS scores By CRAIG HAMMETT Staff Writer Assistant Superintendent Mike Fitsloo repotted results of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills for New Braunfels students taking the exit level which it glide IO. Fitsloo showed the New Braunfels Independent School District Board Tuesday night the percentages of mastery by sophomores tested in early March. Fitsko said that at least seven seniors have not paaaed their TAAS exam. Although less than one percent of seniors fail to pass the test, the NBISD will let them participate in graduation ceremonies if they have com- NBISD students improve in two of three areas pitted all school credit requirements for graduation. “We feel like in four or five years if a student has completed the credits but has not met the state requirement on the test, we will let them walk the stage,” said Superintendent Charles Bradberry. He said those students could not officially receive a diploma until they have passed tire test which most eventually do. New Braunfels students taking the exit level tests in 1994 recorded improvement in two of three areas. Numbers rose sharply in the reading portion with 80 percent reaching a master's level as opposed to 67% in 1993. Math scores improved from 52 to 56% and writing remained the same at 84% although this was the highest level of mastery. Fitsko said results from other schools would give a statewide average available in early June. With that information, the district will be able to see how they compare, he said. The State of Texas has assessed minimum basic skills in mathematics, reading and writing for ten years, first with the Texas Assessment of Basic Skills CTABS), the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills (TEAMS) and in October 1990, tire introduction of TAAS. TEAMS was more of a minimum skills test," he said. "The academic skills is higher-oriented that involves more problem solving." The TAAS tests have been given to grades 3-8 including the exit level to sophomores. Students must pass the test to graduNe in Texas, one of 17 states to have such a requirement. Fitsko said students have the opportunity to retake portions of the test until they have passed all three. “They lowered it to sophomore level to give more opportunity to retake it," he said “Once they pass apart, they don't have to repeat." District goals list released by board District compiles five-year plan By CRAIG HAMMETT Staff Writer The New Braunfels Independent School District board released a list of goals Aor the Alture at their Tuesday meeting. Among the goals are to develop a five-year plan for facilities, equipment and personnel based on projected student enrollment, develop a plan to exceed 96 percent attendance for staff and students, and develop and implement a plan to increase ACT and SAT results to minimum levels accepted by nugor public universities. Other goals include expanding technology programs to include health occupations and to reevaluated vocational programs to ensure emphasis is placed on world experiences based on problem-solving with more extensive training and apprenticeships. “This is the greatest input the board has had from the community,” said Board President Dick Robinett. “It was a very wise decision on the part of the board to come forth with such high goals." Committees including community members and NBISD staff were asked to compile and rank various goals and needs of the NBISD. Top goals were then prioritized through rankings. Among several other action items, the board authorized the hiring of six new state compensatory teachers for next year funded through the federal and state governments as will three and one half-day position for special education. Superintendent Charles Bradberry said four elementary-grade teachers will be needed to meet state-required teacher-student ratios. He said four other higher-grade teacher positions would depend on budget funding for the upcoming school year. In higher grades, the new block schedule which goes into effect in 1994-95 will raise graduation requirements for the ‘96, ‘97 and *98 senior rlasffft Current requirements of a minimum 22 credits will remain for *95 seniors. The Class of *96 (current sophomores) will need 23 credits, the ‘97 class 25 and the ‘98 class 26 to grad uate. The district placed these requirements to encourage students to pursue the TEA recommended Enriched Academic Program and take advantage of the 32-credit opportunity available through the new block scheduling which starts in the 1994-95 school year. ‘A Special Treat’ HBraid-Zeitung photo by JOHN HUSETH Sieglinde Smith, once known as the "Living Hummel," will conduct tours of the Hummel Museum's vault, where numerous pieces of Hummel artwork is stored. Tour of museum vault to be added attraction for HummelFest ’94 By JENNIFER ROMPEL Staff Writer The vault of the Hummel Museum holds a special treat for those people who appreciate the work of Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel. Artwork that has never been seen by the public is tucked away in the vault. During HummelFest, which will be held this weekend, Hummel collectors will have the chance to tour the treasure-filled vault. Tours will be led by Sieglinde Smith, who as a child posed for Sister Hummel. Smith said the tours will feature unframed work by Sister Hummel and anecdotes and stories about the artist “Only a small part of the art is seen by the public. To be downstairs is a special treat. Visitors will be able to see art before it is framed which allows them to see more detail. I will give explanations and tell anecdotes and stories about the artwork,” said Smith. “Our most special posession is Sister Hummel’s very own rosary. When visitors are in the vault they might get to see it and maybe even hold it." A portion of the artwork is kept in the vault because it must be held at a certain temperature and humidity. “People believe the art is in the vault because we don’t have space in the museum. That is not so. The reason we change the exhibit is because it is mostly paper and paper is a very fragile commodity. The fibers will weaken when the pictures are hanging After six months, the art is taken down and laid flat,” said Smith. ‘It is like a living thing. We have to take care of it because it is irreplaceable,” she said. Smith said the Hummel Museum is special because it holds works of Sister Hummel that show the artist’s versatility. “She did not only draw children. She also created religious art — art that one cannot create figures from. That is in this collection,” she said. “She studied all manners of art. It is absolutely amazing that she could see a style and use that style in her own art,” said Smith. “It is mind-boggling how really talented the lady was. It is to the point of genius, the way she did what she did Collectors are not aware of this. They are only familiar with the figurines. “She knew how to capture the essence of a child. She discovered that a child in any part of the world would react in the same way. That is what she captured on paper,” said Smith. The fact Smith is conducting the tour of the vault will be a special feature to Hummel collectors. Smith was featured in at least two of Sister Hummers drawings and might have been the subject of several more. “People make a big deal about that. I still don’t understand why. I was fortunate to be where I was at the right time,” said Smith. Smith and her family lived just a few miles south of the convent where Sister Hummel lived. “I don’t remember the special lady’s face, but I do remember something much more special — I remember her love,” said Smith. ‘The more I have learned about the lady and her art, the more fascinated I am about it The more I know, the more I want to know “Her spirit is really here Everything the lady ever thought or felt is represented in her art. Her spirit is in her art. She will be remembered forever This is her legacy,” said Smith. The vault will hold only IO people and two tours arc planned. Cost of the tour is $25 The proceeds will be donated to thr Hummel Museum. Hummer est will begin Friday May 20 and will celebrate Sis cr Hummers birthday For more information about the event call the Hummel Museum at 625-5636. Tons of food! Letter carriers’ food drive nets many donations By CRAIG HAMMETT Staff Writer Many more Comal County residents will be a little less hungry this season after a massive food drive held by local postal carriers. The food drive last Saturday netted 15,000 pounds of non-perishable food items, 71/2 tons and much more than expected said local postal worker Don McBroom who coordinated the event. The local food drive started as a national project by the National Association of Letter Carriers. The local version of the program started in 1992 and netted 8,000 lbs. After a one-year hiatus, the 1994 version co-sponsored by the AFL-CIO, U.S. Postal Service and United Way more than doubled original efforts. “People just put food out by the mailbox and the carriers picked it up with their ncxmal routes,” he said “We started unloading at 3 pro. We didn’t finish until about 4:15 p m.” McBroom said woken loaded 13 or 14 half-ton pickups with goods for the food bank. He added the the program would continue next year and hopefully could expand to Canyon Lake and other parts of the county. The drive this year focused mainly on city routes. “It’s easy. All you have to do is drop it by your mailbox,” he sud. Food donated in the drive remains in Comal County The Food Bank, six years old, is supported by churches and organizations and staffed mainly by volunteers. Betty Drawe, secretary for the organization, said the Food Bank helps families with emergency need of food She said persons must apply and qualify for the aid Concerts in the Park series to begin tomorrow From staff reports The 10th Annual Conceits in the Park series will get under way tomorrow night in Lands Park with Allen Voight St Friends performing. The concert will begin at 7:30 pro. at the park's concert shell. Allen Voight & Friends plays blues music. The concert series, called the "Miller Genuine Draft Concerts in the Park," will be held each Thursday through Sept I. The concerts are being sponsored by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung, Bug-A-Meistcr, TCI Cable-vision, the Music Source and KBNB radio. The series will be highlighted by a special performance on June 16 with local favorites Jay Eric and Qay Bilker. For more information, cill 629-4457.For news, advertising or subscription information, call 625-9144 or Metro 606-0846 ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: May 18, 1994

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