New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 10, 1994, Page 4

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

May 10, 1994

View full page Start A Free Trial!

Issue date: Tuesday, May 10, 1994

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Sunday, May 8, 1994

Next edition: Wednesday, May 11, 1994

NewspaperARCHIVE.com - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions
About New Braunfels Herald ZeitungAbout NewspaperArchive.com

Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 311,884

Years available: 1952 - 2013

Learn more about this publication
  • 2.04+ billion articles and growing everyday!
  • More than 400 years of papers. From 1607 to today!
  • Articles covering 50 U.S.States + 22 other countries
  • Powerful, time saving search features!
Start your membership to the world's largest newspaper archive now!
Start your genealogy search now!
See with your own eyes the newspapers your great-great grandparents held.

View sample pages : New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, May 10, 1994

All text in the New Braunfels Herald Zeitung May 10, 1994, Page 4.

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - May 10, 1994, New Braunfels, Texas Page 4 ■ Tuesday, May 10,1994 Opinion ■ To talk with Managing Editor Mark Lyon about the Opinion page, call 625-9144, ext. 21 H o I J I I cl Z Ll ll (J Q U \0 T ABL I“Writers and travelers are mesmerized alike by knowing of their destinations.” • Eudora Watty, Author, 1964 E D I TORI < Smith sets an exampleAt first glance Rep. Lamar Smith's office spending seems high, but look behind the headlines Republican U.S. Representative Lamar Smith, who represents the lion's share of Comal County, has a strong reputation as a fiscal conservative. When presented with a choice of more or less spending, he consistently picks the lower spending option. His efforts to cut IO percent from the federal government's overhead is so serious it is almost a crusade. He is the darling of taxpayers' watchdog groups. So it was shocking to see the new Associated Press report that Smith recorded one of the largest jumps of any member of the Texas delegation in spending for his offices and office staff. Smith's spending jumped from $764,746 to $907,683 between 1992 to 1993, an 18.6 percent increase. For Smith to preach the gospel of fiscal conservatism while his budget for things such as payroll for his office staff, mail and general office expenses mushroomed would smack of hypocrisy. But knowing Smith, it is not surprising that there are some legitimate reasons for those numbers. First of all, they may not be entirely accurate. Smith's office says its records show his spending went from $804,149 to $869,925, an eight percent jump. Smith also replaced an outdated computer system for his office. His district also grew to take in large new areas, such as 100,000 residents of Williamson County, north of Austin, when redistricting went into effect last year. As a result, he decided to open a new district office in Round Rock, a considerable expense, but one that gives provides valuable service to residents of that area. Smith has proven to be a conservative steward of our tax dollars, and this new report does nothing to change that fact. (Today's editorial was written by City Editor Roger Croteau.) Write us • • • Th® Now Braunfelo Herald-Zeitung welcome® letter® on any public issue. The editor reserve® the right to correct a polling, style, punctuation and known factual error*. Letter* should be kept to 2SO words. We publish only original mail addressed to The New Braunfelo Herald-Zeitung bearing the writer's signature. Also, an addles® and a telephone number, which are not for publication, must bs included. Please cits the pegs number and date of any article that is mentioned. Preference is given to writers who have not been published in the previous 30 day*. Mail letters toe Letters to the Editor do The New Braunfelo Herald-Zeitung P.O. Drawer 311328 New Braunfels, Texas 78131-1328 Fax:(210)625-1224 New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung Edtor and Pubfeher............................................................David Sultans Genial Manager............................................................Cheryl DuVai Managing Editor..................................................................Mark    Lyon Advertising Director............................................................Paul    Davis Circulation Director....................................................Carol Ann Avery Pressroom Foreman...................................................Douglas Brandt Classified Manager...................................................Karen Reininger City Editor.....................................................................Roger Croteau PufabfltMd as Sunday monunga and weekday mornings Tuesday through Friday by Sib New BnaojUs HeraLLZeiimg (LISPS 377-MO) 707 Lank St, ar P O. Drawer 311328. New Braunfels, Comal County, Til 78131-1328. Second dam postage paid by the New Br am /UeHereld-Zeitmg is New Braunfels, Texas. Chmt deli vend is Comd snd Guadalupe oounScs: dace months, $16; me months, $29; os® jeer, $49. Senior Qian Discounts by earner delivery only: ax months, $23; one year, $43. Mel ddivcry amide Canal County is Texas: Save mufti, $2655, ax mamba, $47 TU ce® yaw, $88.30. Mil outed® Tau*, dx months. $61.93; ans year. $103.23. Subscriber* who have not received a newspaper by 5:30 p m. Tuesday through Fnday ar by 7 JO am os Sunday my call (210) 623-9144 or (210) 6064846 (toll-free fee Seguin, Marim Canyon Lake, Bulverde and Sa® Antonio) by 7 fun. a weir days cr by ll •Jean Sunday. PonMAfT**: Sand adthaas chan*** to Sat New BnemfeU Herald-Zeiimg, PX). Dmw-*311328, Nm Braunfels. Tx. 78131-1328.OpinionUncovering the framers’ ‘Original Intent’ Despite slings and arrows Hillary loves her job WASHINGTON (AP) — Shrugging off bad hair days and political enemies, Hillary Rodham Clinton mused about the large and small annoyances that come with life in the White House and told a live TV audience: “U*s worth it” In an hour-long appearance Thursday on CNN’s “Larry King Live,” the first LSdy said1 site's trying to follow her husband's example lo “take criticism seriously but not personally and lo try to learn something from it." Mrs. Clinton, chatting with King before taking questions from callers around the country, said she loves “all the progress that’s been made in the last IS months" but chafes at the new limits on her freedom. “It’s hard being so confined, feeling that you can't just walk out the door and go to the store," she said. Joking about another of the challenges she faces, Mrs. Clinton told King that her hair is something “I’ve Today in history Analysis struggled with ail my life. I'm hoping somebody’s going to form a group — Hair Anonymous — that I can join." The weightier challenges of her first 15 months as fust lady were evident as Mrs. Clinton calmly deflected a range of questions from King and viewers. —Her response to the latest subpoena for White House documents from Whitewater special prosecutor Robert Ftske? “I'm sure he’s conducting a very thorough investigation and we will, of course, fully cooperate." —What of an Arkansas woman’s claims Clinton made unwanted sexual advances toward her when he was governor? “I have nothing to add lo what’s already been said by the While House.’’ (The While House says the allegations are untrue.) —Will she agree to a GOP request that she allow the Chicago Mercantile Exchange to release more records on her lucrative commodities trades in the 1970s? 'TU sure consider that." —How did she feel about rumors about her personal relationship with Vince Foster, who killed himself last summer? “Profoundly sad." “It’s so sad that when something tragic happens that people... try to create conspiracies and act paranoid and all that,’’ Mrs. Clinton said. “But some of it is not explainable except for people who just want lo cause trouble." It was after a string of such questions that King asked Mrs. Clinton if it was all worth it. “With all you’ve gone through... do you want eight years of this?" he asked. “Oh, it’s worth it, Larry, it really is," she said with a laugh. Then, speaking more seriously, she pointed to Thursday's House passage of an assault-weapons ban as an example of the rewards. Asked lo assess the intense criticism that she attracts from some circles, Mrs. Clinton speculated one cause is “fear and insecurity" at the changes the president is pushing, and part of it is resistance to her role as a new kind of first lady. Interspersed with the personal reflections, Mrs. Clinton fielded a variety of questions about health care reform, the cause she has championed since her husband took office. She was direct in responding to a 21-year-old college student who said he was uninsured by choice and then questioned the burden “to my generation in order to support your generation’s social health care plan." Mrs. Clinton told the young man he might feel “immortalbut that it was only fair that all groups help pay for insuring all Americans, since anyone could get sick and put a burden on the health care system. “You should be paying your fair share now," she told him. By Tho Associated Press Today is Tuesday, May IO, the 130th day of 1994. There are 235 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: Ob May IO, 1869, a golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, making the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United Stales. On this dale: la 1774, Louis XVI ascended the throne af France. 1b 1775, Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys captured the British-held fortress at Ticonderoga, N.Y. la 1818, American patriot Paul Revere died in Boston. la 1165, Unicm farora captured Confedense President Jefferson Davis in Irwinville, Ga. la 1908, the first Mother’s Day observance took place during church services in Grafton, W.Va., and Philadelphia. la 1924, J. Edgar Hoover was given the job of FBI director. la 1933, the Nazis staged massive public book burnings in Germany. la 1940, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain resigned, and Winston Churchill formed a new government la 1941, Adolf Hitler’s deputy, Rudolf Hess, parachuted into Scotland on what he claimed was a peace mission. (Hess ended up serving a life sentence at Spandau prison until 1987, when he apparently committed suicide.) la 1968, preliminary Vietnam peace talks began in Paris. In 1978, Britain’s Princess Margaret and the Earl of Snowdon announced they were divorcing after 18 years of marriage. Ten years ago: A federal judge in Salt Lake City ruled the government was negligent in its 1950s open-air nuclear weapons testing, and ordered it to pay $2.6 million in ten cancer cases (however, the award was later overturned). The International Court of Justice said the U.S. should halt any actions to bkx:kade Nicaragua’s ports (the U.S. had already said it would not recognize World Court jurisdiction on this issue.) Five years ago: In Panama, the government of General Manuel Antonio Noriega announced it had nullified the country’s elections, which independent observers said the opposition had won by a 3-1 margin. When a person sets out to study a subject he hopes to learn enough to enlighten himself about that subject. When we step back or away from the study, we sometimes find that our newly acquired knowledge or information has altered the way we once viewed the subject Sometimes when we take stock of the new approach it comes as a mild shock to us as BtodSOto we evaluate the new knowledge. Such was the case with this writer when I realized that the Constitution of the United States IS NOT the supreme law of the land. In fact, the Constitution is no law at all. The framers of the Constitution did not set about writing a law to govern this new nation. What they did write, and what they intended to write, and what we have in the Constitution today are “certain great principles" upon which a government could be (and was ) built his these great principles by which taws and policies are tested. Laws made by a representative government In all things the framers were interested in representative government They wanted above all things to preserve representative bodies which are the guardians of the freedom we enjoy today with our precious liberties. On November 19, 1864, President Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address dedicating the National Cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The first sentence in that address is probably the most profound endorsement of the great principles laid down by the framers of the Constitution. Mr. Lincoln said,‘'Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created free and equal" There is a key phrase that we simply read over without thought.."All men are created free and equal." All is the key word for it means every person. Every citizen of every state of this Republic to which we belong, and in which we are honored to live. Lincoln spoke these words even as the dvil war raged around him. He concluded with a dedication to the great principles laid down by the constitutional framers of 1776..."This Nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that the government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth." The men who framed the Constitution had a deep, abiding fear of the majority rule for they saw the possible oppression for the minority among the majority. It may surprise you to read, perhaps for the first time, that the first eight amendments to the Constitution which we commonly accept as the Bill of Rights were included to protect the greatest minority in the world, “the individual." Further, the checks and balances written into the Constitution where the powers of the executive, the legislative and the judicial are limited by the very checks and balances between the different branches of government These work to the good of the governed. A classic example is handed to you by President Roosevelt when he attempted to stack the Supreme Court in his favor in the ‘30s. He wanted hand-backed appointees who, in all likelihood, would rule in his favor over the third branch, Congress. On August 6,1864, in a address to the 148th Ohio Regiment, Lincoln said, “But this government must be preserved in spite of the acts of any man or set of men." President Lincoln was very aware of the necessity of representative government On August 22,1864, in an address to the 166th Ohio Regiment, he stated as follows, “It is not merely for today, but for all time to come, that we should perpetuate for our children’s children that great and free government which we have enjoyed all our lives." One fact impresses itself upon me constantly as I move deeper and deeper into this study. The fact is, “Individual Responsibility of Every American Citizen." We must act responsibly to insure the freedoms which are our birth-right The only way to insure that freedom is I) be an enlightened individual (which, sadly, we often are not enlightened as most information fed to our brains comes from the utter gaibage given to us via television, radio and newspapers). Point 2) our constant ongoing demand for representative government These things will secure our freedoms. In no case, in no instance, can a president pass a taw. It is impossible under the separation of powers devised by the framers of the Constitution. He can suggest a bill, and at times Congress will actually ask him to do exactly that There are times when Congress writes the bill in a way that the President can claim credit for it Regardless, the President did not pass the taw. In this article I have tried to lead you through the intent of the framers of the Constitution. This is their view of the principles that would allow taws to be passed to insure the welfare of the citizens through representative government but not at the expense of the minority of those governed. God bless you one and all, and representative government keep and preserve our freedom. QkUOl ;

RealCheck