New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, June 16, 1993

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 16, 1993, New Braunfels, Texas Braves knock off Astros in Tri-County action -UA 50 CENTS New Braunfels I o fjfcj®',' iii ’(MT .HI JP9P '    1    ‘    hW"‘    11 Herald *Zci t IU. If ii* >0; Ut 18 Pages in two sections ■ June 16,1993 Serving Comal County ■ Home of Greg Weston ‘g Vol. 141, No. 149 INSIDE Obituaries............2A Water Watch..........2    A Opinion..............4A Comics............. 10 A Classifieds..........3-6B Sports............11-12A STAMMTISCH Best Wishes The New Braunfels Hcrald-Zcitung sends birthday wishes to Lydie Krizek, Dustin Saulle, Hobble Brandenburg, Melinda Chapa and Hayden B(X)s. Teen Connection meeting on tap Thursday A board meeting for Teen Connection is scheduled for tomorrow morning at 7 a m. at Krauses Restaurant. Child care training program A child care training conference designed for individuals who work with prc-school children is scheduled ft>r Saturday, June 2b at Lone Star Primary School in New Braunfels. Hic conference is sponsored by die Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Pre-iegis-tration fee is S3, and the cost of the conference is SS. Forms are available in the extension service office at 132 S. Water Lime; or call 625-9178. GBRA board meeting set for Thursday A regular meeting of the Guadalupc-Blanco River Authority will be held Thursday, June 17 of the Authority's ol rices, located at 933 E. Court St. in Seguin. Fountain Walk-A-Thon set for June 27 A walk to save the fountain is planned for Sunday June 27 at 8:30 am. The six-mile walk through the parks and historic neighborhoods will begin at the Hummel Museum, and all proceeds from participants’ sponsors will go toward restoring the I OO-year-old fountain. Families, teams and challenges are welcome and add to the fun. Pledge sheets and entry forms arc available at Johnson Furniture, 283 S. Seguin, or Vol-brecht’s, 339 Main Plaza Call 625-5321 for more information. Meeting set on new Christian school A grass roots meeting concerning the formation of a new Christian scIkxjI in New Braunfels will lake place on Thursday, June 17 at 7 p.m. at Cross Lutheran Church, located at 169 S. Hickory. II anyone is interested but unable to attend, contact Krista lamsluss at 625-3666. (The New Braunfels Herald-’Aetlung invites its readers to sui) mil items to Stammtisch According to the Sophienburg Archives and members of the German community, "Stammtisch " represents a sitting plac e for members of a community to gather and share the day *<f happenings. H e invite you to share with us.) Kroger to close local store New Braunfels store just one of 15 area closures by grocery firm From staff and wlra reports SAN ANTONIO — Kroger Co. officials say the grocery company plans to pull out of the San An mn 10 area, where it operates 15 stores and employs l,700|>cople. Kroger officials said they expect to completely withdraw from the area which includes the closure of Ute New Braunfels store - a loss of approximately IOO jobs, and the loss of a major contributor to the area economy. ■ See Chamber reaction, page 2A The move comes alter Kroger clerks rejected a bid to renegotiate their union contract. “Kroger expects to enter into final agreements with interested buyers for the sale of its San Antonioarca foixl stores,” said a statement issued Monday by Kroger. A letter from Cincinnati hosed Kroger to distric t workers Monday stud Kroger expects to close the stores in about 60 days. Local 455 of the United Focxi and Commercial Workers, representing 900 cashiers, deli and |xo duce workers, late Sunday rejected Kroger’s plan to trim wages and benefits lo boost profit margins. Both voles needed to jibe to make the votes effective. New Braunfels will he left with two Wuest’s supermarkets, one Handy Andy and one H.E.B. when Kroger shuts down in two months, but according to Mike De I a Garza vice president of public affairs for H P B. said the competition in lite area will not diminish. "Hie closing of Kroger shouldn’t allect us at all," Dc* La Garza said, “We have a plan in effect through the year 2000, so from a planning and marketing standpoint we shouldn’t Lie affected. I think a lot of people underestimate the competition in this area." ‘New Beginnings’ Bv ROSE MARIE EASH Staff Writer The most precious thing Hospice New Braunfels has to offer at a life’s ending is the opportunity for some new beginnings. New friends who anne to meet the physical, emotional, spiritual and prat tical needs of patients and their loved ones are a wonderful, life affirming benefit. Marjorie Spaulding lakes every opportunity to give testimony about that. Her hushand, Albert S|iaulding, was a hospice patient for about sixteen months. “He wouldn’t have done that had he hail to go to die hospital or to a nursing home,” Mrs. Spaulding said. ‘They make the difference, they’re sensitive to the person who is ill as well as the family and the nurse was very gifted with my husband. These people impressed me and it lakes a lot to impress me.” She spoke of the new friends that Albert Spaulding made in the last months of his life. “My husband was a very private person,” Mrs. Spaulding said. “He wouldn’t have been comfortable with having someone alme to hath and massage him with most people, but the hospice worker who came was wonderful — she had a wonderful touch with him." There was a special friend from Hospice, however, who was a volunteer. He provided no medical care but in many ways Mrs. Spaulding spoke of him as the most important part of the learn. “For my hushand not only was he this helpful perron with physical chores like walking the dog and bringing my husband chewing tobacco — most of all they bonded as men," she said. “My hushand would not have had that hail it not been for this tremendous person. “So what can I say, you’re forever grateful and recognize how fortunate my husband was and how fortunate the family was. Every family is different, every individual is different, but these people are there for wherever their patients are. They’re sensitive lo the different nuances of personalities and characters and alkiw that person to be themselves without being diminished in any way. Thai’s important.” Dan Ashley was the very special volunteer in Albert Spaulding’s life. “I started spending a couple of hours with him on Tuesdays and Thursdays and then on Saturdays and Sundays I would come over — I said because Dan Ashley (left) and Marjorie Spaulding have played Important roles each other's lives. we couldn’t let the newspapers set out there, but it was really because I just wanted to come over and see him,” said Ashley. "I’ve liked all the hospice paucnts I've had and all of them amaze me, but Mr. Spaulding was an exceptional guy. "I was told when I went through the hospice training that the volunteer will gel more out of the patient than the patient will get out of the volunteer," he said. “lf there was ever a true statement made, that was iL And the hospice staff is always ready to go out of their way to help me with questions or anything.” Liospice services are designed for patients who can no longer benefit from curative treatment — typically the life expectancy is six months or less. Most receive care at home. Physicians, nurses, counselors, therapists, aides and volunteers work together with the pauent and family to ensure that puuents live an alen, pain-free life with dignity and quality al home or in a In hi ie-1 ike setting. The focus of hospice care is not the disease bol the puucm. Hie key element is the recognition ol dying as a normal process bul one that requires special sensitivity and compassion stressing human values that go beyond the physical needs of the patient. Studies have shown hospice care to be no more costly and frequently less expensive ihan conventional care during the last six iiKMilhs of life according to the Nation a1 Hospice Organization. The use of less high-cost technology and the services of family, friends and volunteers for Die day-to-day patient care al home are ated as realms by the organization. Hospice care is a covered benefit under most private insurance plans and Medicare and Medicaid. Even so the payments rarely cover Uh* full awl ol care so Hospices often rely to a great extent on grants and community su|>port. Hospice New Braunfels is a nonprofit community based organization serving the needs of Comal County and western Guadalupe County. Memorials, donations and bequests enable them to provide care for all patients regardless of their ability lo Herald Zeitung photo by JOHN HUSETH jiay. Hicy are also currently seeking iww volunteers. "We fiavc a lot of different kinds ol opportunities for volunteers,” said Christina Smith, die Hospice New Braunfels Volunteer Coordinator. “We need people lo provide transportation, deliver equipment and do off ice work in uiklitHVi lo working oneiwi-one with puuents. Right now we espec ially need help transcribing medical notes from dictaphone tapes, for instance.” If you are interested in volunteering, call 625-7500. Special training is offered for volunteers who want to work with puuents. DoiuiluMis are also needed arui are tax deductible under Section 501 (cX3) of Uh* Internal Revenue Code. New ESD funding is not answer, commissioner says By ROSE MARIE EASH Stab Writer According to Commissioner J. L. Evans, the new Emergency Services District voted in by the Canyon I .ake citizens will help generate more funds for EMS service in the area. However, it will not be able to provide Uh* amounts necessary to provide full time paid staff. "The EMS has been given $30,000 by the county,” said Evans. “They had an elecuon and created an Emergency Services District which is a taxing authority. It wUI start this year and that will make more funds available.” According to Evans die ESD contracts with the EMS lo provide services and while tire county will conUnue to support EMS, the ESD is a governmental enuty wiUi Uh* taxing authority to raise funds and is primarily responsible for Uh* services. “It’s their primary concern,” he said. “But they’re not going to gel enough for that — it would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars (to provide service based on paid personnel) — look at New Braunfels.” County Commissioners will lie looking at the county budget in July according to Evans. The ESD will receive Uh* first funds from taxes ih*xi February. “We just received a statement from Uh* Comal Appraisal District for $100,000,’’ said William T. Phillips, president of Uie ESD 2 which anurans the Canyon I .ake EMS. "A net of $80,(XX) will he available to them. We just approved a budget for $60,000 for salaried personnel but Umt won’t be until February. "They’re talking abt nil a |KTmaiH*m paramedic and a couple of EMI s — one full-time and a couple of part-time personnel,” he said. “For more funding through Ute ESD they have to go flac k to die legislature in 1995." Hie ESD was initially created by the legislature in response to a petition by the EMS unit accord mg U) Phillips He said Ute district can tax up lo two cents per SKX) value. Speaking of the funding received from Ute anility, Phillips said $30,(XX) has been provided for EMS since Ute unit was split from the fire department Utree or four years ago. "We can always ask them," said Phillips. "We really haven’t talked about increasing the tmuling trim Uh* a mu ny because Uiat was pretty much set in stone.” 4    .    V    •    :•    -    T-'    ’    ,    -T    ;    •    -    *    FT*    T    FFor news, subscription, or advertising information, call 625-9144'    I    ’     i______...  I..    ■'.... ;

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