New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 29, 1993

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

April 29, 1993

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Issue date: Thursday, April 29, 1993

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Wednesday, April 28, 1993

Next edition: Friday, April 30, 1993

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 29, 1993, New Braunfels, Texas New Braunfels Herald-Zei 410 MOI6 10/22/99 50-WE SI MI CR OF'U BL. I SH I NG 1627 E YANDELL BR 172 EL PASO, TX 79903 Thursday, April 29,1993 Serving Comal County • Home of Virginia Vetter 50 Cents Daily, 75 Cents Sunday Vol. 141, No. 114 Residents have a say on search By ROSEMARIE EASH Herakl-Zeltung School officials and community residents took the opportunity to tell a superintendent search consultant hired what characteristics they were looking for in the candidates for the job. According to Olga Lara, a parent in the district, Don Killough, the Texas Association of School Boards consultant, was surprised at the diversity of the district. Lara said the interviews provided an appreciation and understanding that may not have been present without the input of CISD patrons. “He now has a better picture of who he should be recruiting,'" Lara said. That’s a real benefit. For someone who is creative and a visionary it will be a great opportunity." Although she had been skeptical about the necessity for the process, County Judge Carter Casteel said she she changed her mind and decided it was “a wonderful way to get community involvement in the schools” after hearing the patrons. Casteel said most people listed the quality of life in the district as the best thing about the superintendent’s position, better communications as the greatest need, and expressed their hopes that the job would be filled by a strong person. “My comment was that they need someone able to lead, guide and prod the board," said Casteel. * Although he acknowledged that expectations were high for the new superintendent, Killough said the district would have no problem getting a “top-notch" person for the position. “You'll get them, there'll be some really outstanding people to apply," Killough said. On June 21, Killough will recommend 12 to 14 candi dates to the board of trustees. The board will select six to eight candidates who will come to New Braunfels for interviews June 24-26 when the board will narrow the selection to three. The final selection will be made after those three candidates return to New Braunfels June 30 through July 2. On July 7-8, a committee of trustees will visit the home district of the candi date before their final vote to offer a contract on July 9. The district is asking that candidates be prepared to start work by August 15 or earlier. According to Sandra Jack son, CISD public informa tion officer, the district has received approximately 50 applications to date. Aquifer legislation faces tough fight By ROSE MARIE EASH Herald-ZeKung Local Water Representative Doug Miller said compromise legislation on the Edwards Aquifer pumping limitations will encounter the most resistance in the House and the consequences could be significant. Feuding parties in the Edwards Aquifer water war reached a legislative compromise Tuesday that would strictly limit pumping from the underground reservoir. State Sen. Ken Armbrister, D-Victoria, hammered out the agreement early Tuesday after marathon bargaining sessions in Austin, according to Associated Press reports. In addition to enforcing pumping limits, the plan would distribute water rights and create a new authority to meter wells and collect fees. There are more rural votes in the House," Miller said. That’s where the Farm Bureau has its TTT—i ;- MBlSitereM—  —* .    ^    •    if! Associated Press    for    by    Edwards    Aquifer    and    irrigated    land. n.na/4ali,nA Pitmr numninflr tsar. TVia ARA    ailruta. a nmif flnfhnrifv M mnnaab «    »    #»    lowers    w    average yeans, oui* w Buuut iu create a new autnonty to manage    and    enforce    pumping    lim-    percent less than peak demand the water supply.    its among all well owners pro- during dry years. A group headed by State Sen. during more than 25,COO gallons An additional 88,000 acre-feet Ken Armbrister drafted a bill ere- per day from the 176-mile-long would be allocated when aquifer ating a Edwards Aquifer Author- underground resource.    levels are high-But when levels SttssASzs pssssssss*--1 its property tax.    rights totaling 450,000 acre-feet These adjustments would be The authority would be gov- based on historic claims, with tied to wells in Bexar and Uvalde emed by a nine-member board, irrigators guaranteed a minimum counties and to flows at Comal and its operations would be paid allocation of 2 acre-feet per acre of Springs in New Braunfels. strength. Fortunately, the farmers are supportive of Comal Spring flow because they know that its protection will require additional sources of water to be found.” According to Miller, San Antonio’s plan for additional sources is to take water from the Uvalde pool. He said this a major concern for the Uvalde farmers and the Farm Bureau, which is pushing for San Antonio to look for additional sources of water. Although some have suggested a water market, if a farmer chose to sell his allotment of water, the impact on the entire community could be significant, he said. “If it’s only a water market, lots of people will be out of work,” he said. “Somehow we have to put in legislative protection for those areas.” Putting current reports from the San Antonio media into perspective, Miller said the legislation is currently in a subcommittee. However, he said Armbrister is planning to submit the current draft to the full Natural Resources committee today. In order to meet the deadlines set by the courts, Miller said the legislation should be in the Senate by next Friday and to the House committee by May IO. If the legislation is not passed, Miller expressed two concerns. “If we have to have a special session, we have been warned that the delegations from Dallas and Houston will pass the first thing out of the hopper,” said Miller. “Everyone else in the state will be telling us what we have to live with if that happens. “Second, if nothing happens, Fish and Wildlife will have to do something and the legislature won’t meet again for two years,” he said. UHM NBL) Engineer Preston Kennedy, in fun bee keeper garb, works Wednesday evening to transplant a swarm of bees that had taken up residence on the roof of the utility building. Photo by Karla Wenzel. NBU engineer adopts swarm of bees By GARY P. CARROLL Herekf-Zeltung Officials with New Braunfels Utilities told more than 1,000 new tenants to buzz off Thursday, and brought in an expert to help convince them to leave. NBU employees noticed Tuesday that a swarm of bees had taken up residence on the roof of the NBU building. According to NBU Electrical Engineer Preston Kennedy, they came to stay. Kennedy, who keeps bees as a hobby, said that although the possibility that the bees are Africanized is small, there is still a slight chance they might be “killer” bees. They really haven’t fully established a home, so there is no way to know if they are Africanized or not,” Kennedy said. According to Kennedy, one way to determine if the bees are Africanized is to measure a one-inch square of the honeycomb. Based on the number of openings in the comb, he said a determination of the bee type can be made. The only way to know for sure is to take 50 or IOO of the bees and send them to a specialist,” Kennedy said. They have to compare characteristics of the bees to see if they match, and that provides them with a high probability as to whether or not they are Africanized or not.” Africanized bees are smaller and would have more openings in the comb. Kennedy plans to incorporate the bees outside the NBU building with those bees he keeps at home. Kennedy's bees make honey, which he sells to individuals and businesses in San Antonio. Protection efforts at risk of funding cuts By GARY P. CARROLL Herald-Zeltung Cindy Stauffer, executive director of the Comal County Women’s Shelter, said proposed cuts in funding for family violence programs would seriously hamper efforts to protect victims of domestic violence in Comal County. The Texas Council of Family Violence is lobbying to maintain funding at its current level of $17.6 million dollars per year and is hoping for the passage of a Senate proposition calling for an increase of 28 percent. However, the House of Representatives has proposed appropriating $6.9 million for the next two years — a reduction of 61 percent. “Something like that would really hurt us,” Stauffer said. There is no doubt that we would have to cut staff and cut services.” The Comal County Shelter currently receives $74,000 annually, contracted from the Texas Department of Human Services and $50,000 from the federal government. Stauffer said if the cuts were approved by the Legislature, the shelter would stay open, but services would be reduced. “We have operated without a DHS contract in the past and we can do it again,” Stauffer said. “But it would definitely not be an ideal situation.” Stauffer said she feels confident the TCFV lobby will be strong in voicing its opposition to any funding cuts, and said she did not think Gov. Ann Richards would agree with cuts in the Family Violence Program budget. Andrew Wise, an assistant to Sen. Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio, said Wentwworth supports funding family violence programs. The Senate budget is a much better budget in terms of providing funds for protective services,” Wise said. “Mr. Wentworth fully supports adequate funding for the “Something like that would really hurt us. There is no doubt that we would have to cut staff and cut services Cindy Stauffer, executive director program and would oppose cutting back on that particular item.” Stauffer said she is most upset with the notion that the family violence program budget would be cut, but that the Battering Intervention Program, which counsels men who batter their partners, would remain unchanged. “BIP is a good program, but it, hasn’t been proven fully effective, and it still leaves women open to the same violence.” Rep. Edmund Kuempel, R-Seguin, said although the House budget was still in committee and nothing was set in concrete, lawmakers must look at how much money is being budgeted and what programs it is being spent on. “If indeed we’re going to cut the budget and get it down to bare bones, everyone is going have to suffer a little,” Kuempel said. “Obviously no one wants cuts in something like this, but I’d have to look at the budget and see where the money is going before I could make a decision on it." Should the funding cuts be approved, a report from the TCFV said thousands of women would be forced to stay in violent relationships, risking injury and death to them and their children, and possibly resorting to fatal force to escape the violence. “We would have to reduce our staff and our security and we would not be able to guarantee them safety," Stauffer said. “But we will bend over backwards to provide women with a safe place to stay." InsideStammtisch Lotto BRIEFS.................... CLASSIFIED........... CLUB NOTES......... ..........3 COMICS.................. CRIME WATCH....... ........12 OBITUARIES.......... ..........2 OPINION................. ..........4 SPORTS.................. .......8-9 WATER WATCH..... ..........2 WEATHER.............. ...........2 The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung invites its readers to submit items to Stammtisch. According to the Sophienburg Archives and members of the German community, uStammtischH represents a sitting place reserved for a group of special people — or a time set aside for members of a community to gather and share the day's happenings. See more Stammtisch on page 6.Best Wishes The New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung sends Belated Birthday wishes to Richard H. Smith.Project Volleyball New Braunfels High School students will take on their teachers in a volleyball game at 6:30 p.m. today in the high school gym. Admission is $1. Proceeds from the event go to support Project Graduation.Friends For Rivers Friends For Rivers will hold their second annual Water Quality Forum beginning at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 29 at Victoria Bank and Trust, 1000 N. Walnut Ave. Speakers representing Guadalupe-Bianco River Authority, Larry Anderson’s CHS chemistry classes and Annette Hanley’s SVHS Ecology club will detail their involvement in Texas Watch. The public is invited. More information is available at 629-2066.Winning numbersAUSTIN — Here are results of Lotto Texas winning numbers drawn last night by the Texas Lottery:1 -8-10“ 28-34-49Estimated Lotto Texas jackpot: $25 million ;

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