New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, February 28, 1993, Page 5

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

February 28, 1993

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Issue date: Sunday, February 28, 1993

Pages available: 26

Previous edition: Friday, February 26, 1993

Next edition: Tuesday, March 2, 1993

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - February 28, 1993, New Braunfels, Texas SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28. 1993 HERALD-ZEITUNG 5-A How to strengthen U.S. industry and create jobs ‘by WALTER a MEARS Associated Prats WASHINGTON — At the unmarked intersection between national goals and private interests, the White House wants a new traffic pattern, turned toward government investment to strengthen U.S. industry to compete in world markets and create jobs at home. ‘ In the drab economists’ phrase that has been an off-and-on political issue for a decade now, it amounts to an industrial policy. For all the talk and all the treatises, there’s no precise, consensus definition. And President Clinton doesn’t use the terminology. He’s just doing it In simple terms, the idea behind industrial policy is that the government seeks to promote particular industries as those most essential to the national interest, for global competition and the strength of the domestic economy. That fits Clinton’s plan to promote U.S. technology with $17 to $20 billion in research spending and tax incentives over die next four years, financed in large part by shifting funds from defense research. ; In Clinton’s description: “We need a commitment to meet the competition around the ■world in a global economy in which the things that really pay •off are high levels of education •and skills, high levels of investment in appropriate technologies, a very close amount of cooperation •... between workers and management and, in the national sense, between government and business and labor. • “The countries which do that win,* Clinton said. “Those which don’t are punished.* • That points to a more active and explicit federal role. In the ■Republican era, the idea of industrial policymaking was dismissed 'on grounds it would have the gov-lernment pick the winners and !losers in private business. Ronald I Reagan said his goal was getting ‘.government off the back of primate enterprise. ! One of the men in charge of the Clinton policy had a ready rebuttal. **1116 very reason for this new kind of partnership is not to get on the backs of these people but to help them... off their backs,” said Dr. John Gibbons, Clinton’s science and technology advisor. Furthermore, the government has had an industrial policy role all along, sometimes with federal bailouts to prevent a big business from foundering, in space and defense research, in a government-private partnership developing computer chip technology and, always, in defense contracting. “In the 1980s, the most successful industrial strategy we had was our defense budget, which kept our lead in international defense technologies while we were losing our lead in many commercial technologies,” Clinton said. Gibbons said spinoffs and serendipity put defense research to work in the private marketplace, while the Clinton plan aims at more purposeful research, with specific missions, “to focus on areas that are critical for today’s businesses* Electronics, ComputerLand pollution-free automobiles are on the Clinton list for research and Analysis Thera's only one way to come out ahead of the neck. development projects. The next steps aren’t clear. Gibbons said there would be public investment in technology development and information in early stages, prior to the competitive applications of the marketplace. But the administration plan also says the government can be a catalyst for economic growth “by supporting the development, commercialization and deployment of new technology." Democrats have been talking about an industrial policy for years, although they have meant different things by it. There were congressional hearings and bills seeking to mandate such a policy, and it became a debating point in the campaign for the 1984 Democratic presidential nomination. The emphasis in those days was on rebuilding basic manufacturing industries, with incentives that ranged from investment assistance to trade protection to tax breaks. Piecemeal, some measures like those have been adopted, but never in the name of an overall government strategy for industry. Clinton isn’t calling it that, either, but his program leans that way. It is going to be a complex undertaking. Federal research spending now is estimated at about $73 billion, involving more than 700 government centers and laboratories plus campus and corporate research. There is state and regional competition for every grant and project, all likely to intensify in an overhaul of the system. In addition, a step taken in behalf of one vital industiy can collide with the needs of another. Clinton said at the Boeing Co. that he was “going to try to change the rules of the game” to help the U.S. aircraft industry against Europe’s subsidized Airbus. Two other U.S. corporations are major suppliers of jet engines to that same Airbus. r Walter R. Mears, vice president and columnist for The Associated Press, has reported on Washington and national politics for more than 30 years. 7% - 12% Can Your C.D. Beat This?!! Interested? Cad for no oSGgation information 9{ru6etz Insurance 1-800-300-4831 SUNGLASS SALE 35% OFF Complete* Pair Of Sunglasses Sale Ends March 26, 1993. Offer good on new orders only. •Frame, lens and sunglass tint, prescription or non prescription. Photochromic extra specifically excluded. CK3 Creative Eyewear 844 N. Walnut St. New Braunfels, TX 78130 (210)625-9770 SALE CENTURY OF A Full-Featured Value! Simpler Controls! • Heavy duty, large capacity • 2 Speed • 4 Temperatures • 3 Water levels • Self-clean filter SAVE CENTENNIAL SAVINGS ON BIG LOAD DRYERS • America's No 1 preferred brand' • Larger door opening • Porcelain enamel top Bated on contorno' brand » preference tu-veyt    MQOfc L    l0£ 400^ CENTENNIAL SAVINGS ON 30" ELECTRIC RANCES • Dependable Maytag quality • Deluxe easy-clean styling • Big oven capacity MODEL CRE306 Mon.-Fri. 6:30-5:30 SM. 8:30-2:00 Sate* • Service • Parte 625-2358 SUWjSintatonj^ Subscribing tbs. Herald-Zeitung is more valuable than ever! What the Preferred Reader's Club Is all about.... The Preferred Reader's Club is the Herald-Zeitung's new membership program for subscribers which will entitle them to valuable discounts at many local and area retailers. How you can become a member... Becoming a member of the Preferred Reader's Club is easy ... you need simply meet these requirements: •You must subscribe to the Herald-Zeitung for 3 months, 6 months or 12 months. •You must pay for your subscription in advance. What's in It for you? Not only will you be receiving the only local daily newspaper at your home 5 days per week, but you'll also be saving money at many local and area retailers. That's double the value! How to renew your membership... Since your membership card is good only for the term of your subscription, you will receive a new one each time you renew your subscription. When your subscription is about to expire, we will send you a renewal notice by mail and upon receiving your payment,we'll send you an updated membership card valid for that subscription period. As long as you keep your subscription current, you'll automatically continue to be a club member. Watch Sunday, March 7,1993 for the full page ad listing the participating merchants and the discounts offered! Getting on the growing list of participating merchants is as easy as calling the Herald-Zrltung 625-9144 ask for your sales rep or Kristie Who belongs to the Preferred Reader's Club? More than 7,000 area readers will be signed up to the Preferred Reader's Club throughout 1992 and 1993. Upon renewal of their subscriptions, our readers will be mailed a membership card that will be valid for the term of that subscription and a brochure listing all participating merchants, addresses, phone numbers and discounts or specials offered. Signs will be provided for the participating merchants to place near their cash registers or in windows. The first Sunday QI each month a full page (or larger) ad will run listing the merchants, discounts and specials currently offered. Call today to get information and be added to the listl ;

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