New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, June 12, 1991, Page 6

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

June 12, 1991

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Issue date: Wednesday, June 12, 1991

Pages available: 36

Previous edition: Tuesday, June 11, 1991

Next edition: Thursday, June 13, 1991

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 12, 1991, New Braunfels, Texas Page SA Herald Zeltung New Braunfels, Texas Wednesday, June 12, 1991 Teacher of the Year Comal Independent School District's Teacher of the Year Will Webber cuts the cake at a reception held in his honor prior to June’s school board meeting. Webber teaches social studies at Smithson Valley Middle School. (CISD Photo) sh approves $1.5 billion ;dit for Soviet grain deal HINGTON (AP) — The The Soviets are expected to bu WASHINGTON (AP) — The Soviet Union will be able to buy SI .5 billion in U.S. grain this year with loans guaranteed by the U.S. government in another show of support by President Bush for beleaguered Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. The credit guarantees approved by Bush on Tuesday are especially popular in the grain-producing states of the Midwest, whose farmers will benefit from the boost in sales. The announcement also was likely to be popular with commodity markets, where futures prices fell last week when it was thought that the announcement of the administration’s decision could be weeks away. Complete FRATERNAL LIFE INSURANCE for the Entire Family Out iii-Plum Univemnl Lit** and Annuities and IILAV-lliglily Competitive Interest Hates Fof mote tnlof^ation pho^p Of wile lo ouf local r»*pa*onianvo THOMAS G. SCHAFFER Distric t Deputy Kl. Q I lox 148 Canyon l^tke, I X 78133 Phone:    (512)    899-2731 HOYAL NKI GI I DOHS OF A MHH I CA 230 J Cit Ii St, Hark Inland, Illinois ti 1201 HCII 5 Fraternal Life Insurance Since J HOS CONTINENTAL SHOWS, LTD.ANTIQUESSHOW &. SALE NEW BRAUNFELSJUNE 14-15-16CIVIC CENTER 380 S. SeguinNew Braunfels’ Finest Show Ever! Forty booth* will dmpiay antiqua* of every description, in every price range DONT MISS IT--SOMJCTHI NG FOH EVERYONE! Friday 12-8 — Saturday 12-7 p.m. — Sunday 12-5 p.m. Door admission $2.50 ea Good all 3 days of show children free Glass Grinding done at this show! (H*»e th«*» luck* ana chip* fen.oval from jour firm gin*, aud cry via I while you wait) LARGE OR SMALL, YOUR BEST INVESTMENT MAY BF ANTIQUES LONT MISS IT! SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Volcano in Philippines sprays area with ash The Soviets are expected to buy a combination of wheat, com, soybeans and other grains with the money they borrow. To illustrate the importance of the decision to farmers, SI billion would buy most of the Kansas wheat crop or all the com grown in Ohio or all the soybeans produced in Missouri and Mississippi. The announcement, after weeks of seesawing over the Soviets’ request, marked another step toward closer U.S.-Soviet ties as the administration continues to encourage Gorbachev in his struggle to hold his country together and turn it toward economic reform. By ROBERT H. REID Associated Press Writer MANILA, Philippines — Mount Pinatubo erupted with three thundering explosions today, shooting a giant plume of ash more than 12 miles high and chasing, nearby residents away with an outpouring of molten rock and hot gas. Tens miles to the east, hundreds of Americans fled Clark Air Base, home to 15,000 American military personnel and their families. Most of the base’s residents had been evacuated Monday. Clark did not appear threatened by volcanic flow, and there were no immediate reports of casualties. Scientists warned of more, possibly larger eruptions from the 4,795-foot volcano, which was dormant for six centuries until it began spewing steam in April. “This could only be the beginning,” said Raymundo Punongbayan, director of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. Residents of nearby Angeles panicked at the roar of the initial blast, and thousands of people packed roads after a huge gray-greenish mushroom cloud burst from the volcano and turned day to night. Seismologists said searing gas, ash and molten rock raced at great speed down the mountain’s western and northern slopes and into the Marella, Maraunot and O’Donnell rivers. About 3,000 Aeta tribesman, descendants of the original inhabitants of the Philippines, fled the slopes of Mount Pinatubo. At a refugee center in Olongapo, 35 miles southwest of the volcano, survivors told of the sky growing dark, then of hearing a tremendous explosion followed by a rain of ash. “We were forced to leave our homes because stones as big as my head were falling down from the mountains,” said Roily Soria, 18. “There was panic everywhere,” said Manuel Romualdo, who fled with his wife, five children, a cat and a dog. “Children were crying. We had to grab whatever we could.” People scampered for safety with their belongings and livestock over roads slippery with ash fall, reporters said. Refugees wore cardboard boxes to protect themselves from the ash. Ash was so thick in the air that at noon, motorists were driving with their headlights on and wipers operating to clear the windshields of volcanic debris. Bits of ash wafted across the roads as if along a windy beach. An Associated Press photographer who circled the volcano in an airplane said an aerial gunnery range at Clark was covered with ash, as were mountains in the Zambales range, normally lush, green tropical peaks that now looked like the Alps in winter. Today’s eruptions began at 8:40 a.m. with a tremendous blast that sent a mushroom cloud skyward. 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