New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, April 19, 1991, Page 3

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 319,437

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - April 19, 1991, New Braunfels, Texas Herald-Zf/fung, New Braunfels, Texas Friday, April 19, 1991 Page 3 Crossword ACROSS 1 Refuse from smelting 5 Apartment 9 Inscribed stone slab 14 Gown 15 Prefix for space 16 Entertainer 17 Seaweed 18 Ornamental 20 Grasshoppers' cousins 22 Pencil end 23 Chemical suffix 24 Officeholders 25 Some children 26 Implore 27 Hamlet, for one 28 Possessive 31 Cloth design 34 Diminished 35 Quarry yield 36 Drying apparatus 37 Toned down 38 Contract in wrinkles 39 Wrong pref 40 Boot parts 41 Shreds 42 In favor of 43 Ceramic items 44 Healthy 45 Reform movement 47 Iniquity 48 Scottish name syllable 51 Moves back and forth 53 Ship section, once 55 Type of rind 57 Waterless 58 Gold or zinc 59 Surrounded by 60 Fortune 61 Anoint 62 Fasteners 63 Kernel DOWN 1 Piece of wood 2 Yukon peak 3 Playing marble 4 Midwest city 5 Disappearing 6 English city 7 Curves 8 In addition 9 Badly marked 10 Complete 11 Discharges 12 Not taped 13 Maple genus 19 Slowed down 21 Expired 25 Barriers 26 Segment 27 Fruit 29 Voyage 30 Matching groups 31 Grandeur 32 Animal's resting place PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED I M P si ■ B O R J E V E R A I D A M E E T Si ! I R c E A T R T O A F A E S S A YJ S E E N P S K I L L U N B E A P I L O T S T E N O A L I M B G A T O R N D E V E E E M E D N S (L A M P [A M I £ F„ JL L L E T Ic I JR O P E ti R A N Im A s T If T T JI Is E A R 33 Partner 34 Hump 37 Chilled dessert 38 Tool set 40 Outwit customs 41 Beverage 44 Open areas 46 Year's record 47 Beer container 48 Sault Ste 49 Athletic 50 Yielded 51 Body zool 52 Bird 53 Half: pref 54 Knocks 56 Soft food 1 2 3 ■ 14 17 20 23 < t 33 36 39 42 45 51 55 58 61 52 Lawmaker’s firm helping build prison HOUSTON (AP) — A business partly owned and operated by state Rep. Mark Stiles is helping build a state prison that will be named after the Beaumont Democrat, officials said. The company — Transit Mix Concrete Supply — has been hired by general contractor Manhattan Construction Co. to provide concrete to build the $64 million prison. Stiles is vice president and general manager of Transit Mix and owns about 9 percent of the family-owned company’s stock. The job could be worth about $1.25 million to Transit Mix, based on Stiles’ estimates that the average price of a yard of concrete is $50 and the job would require 25,000 yards. Stiles denied any impropriety in the business relationship. “I know of no favors Manhattan has shown this company,” he told the Houston Chronicle. “We had to be the low bidder. Hopefully, we’re saving the state some money.” Officials with Manhattan, based in Tulsa, Okla., refused to disclose how much money Transit Mix would be paid to provide the concrete for the foundation and wall supports. “It’s a very minimal part of the job,” said John Westbrook of Manhattan’s Houston office. Retired teachers honored At the May 4 Kindermaskenball Parade, all retired teachers from New Braunfels and Comal rdeoerdent school districts will be honored From left are retired teachers, Dorothy Nolle Jean Ward, Em a Frazier and Nancy Dwight. (Photo by Erik Karlsson) One teen remains missing after diving from trestle HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston diving crew continued to search today for one of three boys who jumped off a trestle to avoid a Union Pacific freight train. Two teen-agers were rescued by fishermen from the south end of Lake Houston about 6 p.m. Thursday. Police divers searched the waters late into the night for the third boy, but spokesman Richards Retz said they feared the boy had drowned. Spokesmen for Union Pacific did not immediately return telephone calls from The Associated Press to its Salt Lake City, Utah, and Nebraska offices. Initial reports indicated the boys may have been fishing off the trestle or walking along the tracks when the train arrived. Police were unsure whether the missing boy had been struck by the train, which pulled to a stop on trestle. Voters of District 4! RE-ELECT EDDIE TEMPLE CITY COUNCIL Paid Pol. Adv. - DISTRICT 4 >e Rogers, the Computer may predict cardiac death By PAUL RECER AP Science Writer WASHINGTON — A computer program that sorts through the electrical signals of the heart may have found a pattern that forecasts a susceptibility to sudden cardiac death, researchers report in a study published today. Richard Verrier, a professor at Georgetown University Medical Center, said that in laboratory experi-menLs on dogs, his team was able to identify a faint electrical pulse in the heart that preceded ventricular fibrillation, a disturbed cardiac rhythm that kills w ithin minutes. “It’s like a signal that tells when a bridge is about to break up,” Verrier said. “We saw dial whenever the heart is prone to ventricular fibrillation and sudden death there is always an alternation in the T-wave (a specific electrical pulse in the heart),” he said. ‘‘It alternates and then the heart beat goes into a chaotic state.” A report on the research appears today in the journal Science. Verrier said his group discovered the unique cardiac signal by passing electrical sensors into the left ventricle chamber of the hearts in 16 anesthetized dogs and then making a computer analysis of the electrical pulses in the heart. The researchers prompted ventricular fibrillation in the dogs by stimulating a nerve. Invariably, he said, the hearts produced a distinctive pattern change iii the T-waves just before the fatal attack started. “One beat is large and one heat is small” in lite alternation pattern, Verrier said in an interview. “In the normal heart, the T-waves are all even. You could superimpose normal T-waves one on top of the other and they would be almost identical.” A normal heart beat is established by a regular pattern of faint electrical signals in the heart’s nerve system. These signals direct the work of heart muscles that contract and relax during the cycle of pumping blood. During ventricular fibrillation, the rhythm is disrupted and the muscles go into irregular spasms that prevent the pumping of blood. Death follows quickly. Verrier said the next step is to convert his discovery into a system that could he applied to routine medical exams. He said his team is developing a computer analysis system that would find the abnormal T-wave signal during routine cardiac stress tests given in doctor’s offices. Eventually, he believes the technique can be refined to enable doctors to screen patients for susceptibility to sudden cardiac death. ‘‘By pinpointing the presence of alternation in the cardiac cycle physicians may be able to determine which patients are at highest risk of suffering fatal heart attack,” said Vernier. “The method will also enable us to test and improve drugs designed to prevent heart attack.” Such a technique may take several years to develop, but it could save millions of lives, he noted. “Ninety percent of the people who die suddenly — and that’s about 400,(XX) in the U.S. annually — have ventricular fibrillation,” said Verrier. About 25 percent of these deaths occur among people who had no previous diagnosis of heart problems, he said. Science, which published the study, is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. David McKain, Pastor < l)ayspring 620-4353 ' - Christian Meeting at ^66 Hwy SI West 'Fellowsh .irtsi from WAW Tire : \> ’.ear kroner) You are invited to share in the joy This Sunday, April 21 Morning Worship Sunday Night Alive! 10:00 AM 6:00 PM We will tackle the issue of sin We are in a study on Spiritual and its consequences but then gifts what they are and how they also discover the life changing. function in the Body of Christ This good news of forgiveness and week we are still working in grace introductory, foundational principles Message "The Sin Syndrome" concerning spiritual gifts. II Samuel ll A 12 Bring your Bible, a pen 'study guides are provided) and a friend! Everyone welcome1 A new chun ’h A new chance , In essentials, unity, in non es sentials, liberty; in all things, love A Ministry of The Wesleyan Church Stocks Prices driven down NEW YORK (AP) — Traders cashed in gains from the recent rally, driving down stock prices today in a session fraught with uncertainty. The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials dropi>cd 19.56 to 2,979.70 in lite first 214 -hours of trading as the market continued to consolidate following a record bi caking session car lier this week. Volume on the Big Board was light, with K4 OX million shares trad mg hands as of noon oil Wall Sired Declining issues led advances by about 7-to-j, with 1,006 down, 436 up arui 478 unchanged. In the broader market, the New York Stock Exchange composite index fell 1.28 ai 210.98 and the market value index on the American Stock Exchange fell 2.11 ai 370.29. Steve Puhr, bank analyst for the Detroit based Roney A Co., said the market is having difficult) sustaining the Dow’s record closing on Wethics day of 3,004.46 because of wide spread profit taking and uncertainty over the pace of economic ret. every Tile stock narket listing was unavailable bet Mise of transmission problems Its All Happening at The Madison Thursday, April 25 3:00 p.m. "Shakespeare To Go" The San Antonio Shakespeare festival will present a modem Idiom performance of “The raining of the Shrew” in the Madison fireplace lounge. HSV I* 694-7000 Sunday, May 5-Thursduy, May 8 Senior Olympics Hie Madison is tile proud sponsor of the tenuis events ut the ll I B. Senior Olympics to be held ut the Northside Athletic Complex. lur more information: 694-7000 The Madison K U iMirt (art Retirement tuuimumtv 8W> I redtfrickshurg Road • San Antonio f\ "’82<t0 SECRETARY’S DAY IS APRIL 24th Behind every great boss is a great secretary! For all the little things she does, and all the big ones too, send a special message her way that says ‘I appreciate you” in the Herald-Zeitung Along with that message, a rose will be delivered to her (during working hours) on that special day. Published: April 24th Deadline: April 19th Call: Karen, Sharon or Corbe for more information 625-9144 'A.Herald-Zeituno ;

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