New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, October 19, 1989

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

October 19, 1989

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Issue date: Thursday, October 19, 1989

Pages available: 24

Previous edition: Wednesday, October 18, 1989

Next edition: Friday, October 20, 1989

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - October 19, 1989, New Braunfels, Texas BEST AVAILABLE COPY Medicaid coverage is full of holes WASHINGTON (AP) — The Medicaid safety net as so many holes it lets nearly half of America’s poor children slip through, jeopardizing the health of millions of young people, a children’s hospital group said today. See Page 3 New Braunfels JLU. Vol. 137, No. 244 Social Security benefits increasing WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation’s 38.9 million Social Security recipients will get a 4.7 percent benefit increase in January, the biggest boost in TA years, the government said today. See Page 7 .    Local football teams )j\all home boys Friday * The District 284A football season reaches its third rf-- * 410'    M009 10/22/99 SO-WEST MICFOPUBLISHIHG 2627 E YANDELL DP EL PASO, TX 79903 teams playing at erhouse Kerrville and New Braun-iy Alamo Heights See Page 9 707 Lands St., New Braunfels, Texas 78130 (USPS 377-880) 512-625-9144 Thursday October 19, 1989 25 Cents One Section, 12 Pages Shocks rattle through bay area SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Three strong aftershocks rattled an already shaken Northern California today as relief poured into the earthquake-devastated Bay area and an army of workers hunted for people feared buried under a highway. Hope was fading that anyone might still be alive beneath the tons of concrete, two days after a VA -mile-long slab of a double-deck freeway collapsed in Oakland. Authorities fear more than 250 were killed in the cavein. There were signs of life slowly returning to normal. Power was restored in San Francisco’s Financial District early this morning. Airports were open, and the region’s subway system was working. The third game of the World Series, which was within minutes of the opening pitch when the quake struck, was tentatively rescheduled for Tuesday at Candlestick Park in San Francisco. Still, many offices remained closed. The Bay Bridge, the lifeline that links Oakland and San Francisco, See SHOCKS, Page 2 Fired up New Braunfels Fire Department Lt. Victor Sierra helps a Memorial Primary kindergartener out of a fire truck this morning. Sierra, along with other local firefighters, were at the school with trucks, equipment, and puppets to teach the youngsters about fire safety. (Photo by Deryl Clark) Taking positive steps to support child Hiring an attorney is option Editor's note: A person attempting to make an exspouse pay child support has the option of hiring an attorney, although many can't afford attorneys In the ninth of a series on child support, a local attorney tells the problems attorneys face in child support cases. By STEPHANIE DAVIS Staff Writer It takes more than a wave of the magic wand to, get parents to pay child support and positive steps must be taken by all parents to ensure their children are not neglected financially, says a local attorney. “There’s just nothing magical to get money out of somebody,’’ said attorney Kenneth Brazle, who practices family law. “The real bottom line of the whole thing is if the daddy or the mommy docs not have the money or access to the money lo pay child support there’s not a lot you can do,” he said. Persons who aren’t receiving child support often have no money to turn to a private attorney, so they take a number at either the county attorney’s office or the attorney general’s office. “Most attorneys in New Braunfels do take pro bono (for free) cases,” Brazle said. “However each attorney in private practice can only do so many for free. I acknowledge and recognize that attorney fees are not inexpensive. But when people have something that’s wrong with them, they Holding CAD funds pending opinion Attorney: County on correct course By STEPHANIE DAVIS Staff Writer County commissioners were properly administering public monies by withholding funds from the Comal Appraisal District’s retirement plan pending its clarification from the Attorney General, says the county attorney. “We have been told by the Attorney General that there is no basis in law for a private retirement plan of this nature and the county has consistently opposed tile plan since it was first proposed sonic years ago,” said County Attorney Nathan Rhcinlandcr in a written statement Wednesday. Chief Appraiser Richard Rhodes said Monday an invoice for $419.87 plus a 5-pcrccrit penalty was sent to the county last week. An attorney with the State Piojicrty Tax Board said according to the Tax Code the county is delinquent by withholding the funds. “The 5-pcrccnt penalty provision exists to prevent minor squabbles between taxing entities and the central appraisal office,” Rhcinlandcr said. “But this is hardly a minor controversy, going rather to tile very essence of an elected official’s responsibility to the public.” In September, commissioners voted to withhold S419.87 from their quarterly payment of S31,755,t>5 because CAD was participating in the private rctirenk plan offered by Texas Association of Assessing Officers. Sanchez arrested in assault attempt go to a doctor. A child should be thought of in die same way.” So Brazle recommends ex-spouses to take positive steps with the children in mind. “If you don’t take a positive step to do something, nobody else will do it,” Brazle said. “As a dad, if you can’t pay that amount of child support you’ve got an affinitative duty to go in and ask for a reduction. And a mom, if you ic not getting the child support you’ve got an affirmative duty to go in and ask for enforcement of that order.” Throwing a delinquent parent in jail is not always the answer, he said. “I would not want to be locked up and I think a lot of people also feel that way,” Brazle said. “I think the problem is, no matter what a judge says, no matter what the law says, if somebody doesn’t have the money or refuses to go out and get the money — the only recourse is to throw them in jail. I tend to agree that if somebody is thrown in jail, after a period of lime it becomes counterproductive.” To help ensure steady child support payments, persons should make sure all the paperwork is in place at the time of die divorce. “It is important in the beginning for a decree of divorce to be written in such a maimer that it contains income-withholding provisions and enforcement provisions in the event of a child support delinquency,” he said. “A competent family law attorney can draft the proper documents to ensure this.” By STEPHANIE DAVIS Staff Writer A former employee of the Community Council of South Central Texas was arrested Wednesday by New Braunfels police and charged with attempted aggravated sexual assault. Ernest Sanchez, 35, Route 5, Box 550C, was waiting to be anaigned this morning at the Comal County jail. “We had a complaint from a lady who had sought some financial assistance from Community Council and he had come over to do something with this request of service and he made some overt sexual moves toward her,” said police spokesman Martin Mayer. “Apparently, he was in the position of this government entity to dole out government benefits to people.” Mayer said. Community Council Director Louis Ramirez said Sanchez left his job with the Council Sept. 25. “We terminated him when one of our board members told us about the rumor that was going on,” Ramirez said. “We called him prior to Sept. 25. We called him to bring all his files in and to answer to sonic rumors that we had heard. “At that time he said he didn’t feel he had to answer to us for anything,” he said. Ramirez said Sanchez had worked for the Council about a year and a half. ITic council is directed by 20 directors and offers assistance to persons living in the rural areas of the Alamo Arca (’ouncii of Governments. Consumer prices post modest hike WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer prices in September rose an unexpectedly modest 0.2 |X*rcent, with most prices virtually unchanged except for a sharp rise in clothing costs, the government said today. Energy prices, which had climbed sharply at die wholesale level, raising the expectation of an increase on die retail level, fell for the fourdi consecutive month in September, the Labor Department said. The report triggered an announcement that the nation’s 38.9 million Social Security recipients will get a 4.7 percent benefit increase in January to offset the effects of inflation over the past year. The cost-of-living increase is determined by comparing the Consumer Price Index in the July-Scptember quarter with the same period of last year. The average recipient will see his or her benefits increased by $25 a month to $566. At the same time, the cap on Social Security payroll taxes will rise. Workers will have to pay the tax on their first $50,400 in wages, up from See PRICES, Page 2 Government report show widening gap WASHINGTON (AP) — The government’s latest report on poverty shows the gap between rich and poor is widening as the wealthy reap a disproportionate share of the nation’s record peacetime expansion, advocates for the poor say. The poverty rate fell from 13.4 percent in 1987 to 13.1 percent last year, and the number of impoverished people declined from 32.3 million lo 31.9 million, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. But it said neither change was big enough to be statistically significant. Robert Greenstein of the private Center on Budget and Policy Priorities said the report “provides dis turbing evidence of the unevenness of the (economic) recovery." “Its economic benefits are disproportionately going to those at the top of the income spectrum and missing many at the bottom,” he said. The poorest fifth of the population received 4.6 percent of total national family income in 1988, the lowest percentage since 1954, while the richest fifth received 44 percent, the highest ever recorded, he said. The Census Bureau, however, chose to highlight a 1.7 percent jump in real per capita income last year, to a new high of $13,120. St# REPORT, Page 2 Earthquakes hit rural China BEIJING (AP) — A series of major earthquakes shook a largely rural area of nordicm China before dawn today, killing at least 18 people and flattening about 8,000 homes. Officials of the State Seismological Bureau said the quakes, which injured at least 28 people and snuck less than 24 hours after the devastating quake in northern California, were not related lo that tremor. The temblors — registering between 5.0 and 6.0 on die Richter scale — hit an area along the Shanxi-Hebei provincial border and at least one was felt in Beijing, the official Xinhua News Agency quoted the bureau as saying. The stricken arca is a flat and dusty region about 135 miles west of the capital where farmers grow wheat and other grains and many live in one-story unfired clay-brick homes with dirt floors that easily collapse in major quakes. Shanxi is also China’s major coal-producing province and the stark brown land is pocked with coal mines. The first quake, measuring 5.7, shook areas of Shanxi and Hebei provinces late Wednesday. It was felt in the capital, but there were no reports of damage and the bureau said there was no need to take safely measures in the city. 'There were at least four other quakes registering 5 or The officials said there was still relatively little information about the extent of the damage. Xinhua said the casualty figures of 18 dead and 28 injured were "preliminary/' above in the next six hours, including one of 6.0 magnitude. Such tremors are capable of doing considerable damage in a populated arca. Bureau officials said at least 300 small quakes were recorded, but there were no major aftershocks after dawn. lite officials said there was still relatively little information about the extent of the damage. Xinhua said the casualty figures of 18 dead and 28 injured were “preliminary.** An official at the Civil Affairs Ministry said he had no information. “Wc’ie just looking into it now. Call us back tomorrow." The stricken area is not open to foreign reporters and efforts lo reach it by telephone were not successful. See COUNTY, Page 2 Good Day There is a freeze warning in effect tonight so bring in the plants and take care of your animals. Today’s high will be between 65 and 68 degrees, t here will be a warming trend through the weekend with Saturday 's high reaching 75 and Sunday’s high going up to 78 degrees. O cmighi lows will be in the mid lo iq \k 40s. Inside: CLASSIFIED..........................IC    12 COMICS.........................................6 CROSSWORD............................ 3 DEAR ABBY................................4 HOROSCOPE ..........B KALEIDOSCOPE.......................... 6 SCRAPBOOK.................4 SPORTS....................................9-10 TV LISTINGS................................8 WEATHER.....................................2 Stammtisch It’s storytelling day at New Braunfels Children’s Museum. Storyteller Daryl Fleming will relate tales of India this afternoon beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the museum in Courtyard shopping center. Storytelling is part of the current exhibit, “Where in the World?” which focuses on geogra-phy of New Braunfels, Texas, the United Stales, Kenya, India, Saudi Arabia and China. Youngsters aie invited to come early or stay late to visit the exhibit unlay Mean while, on Saturday, Jelly Beans (Debbie Field and Roxanne Jones) will present a fun hour of creative dramatics, puppetry and storytelling in the Puppet Palace at die museum The show suns af HUO a.m. At in »n. Rani Pemmaraju from the Witte Museum’s UN sc hoot will prepare Curry in a Hurry so children (and their parents, tool can experience exotic Indian fare Then, at 1:30, Rani will show youngsters how “Yoga is not a bear” and share with children a:id parents the art of yoga and pus ting minds and bodies at case. Admission to the exhibit is $1 for children non-members (free for children members and youngsters under 2), and $2 for adult nonmembers. Family members are $30 and allow unlimited free admission to the museum.... New Braunfels Assembly #277 International Order of the Rainbow for Girls has rescheduled its Rum mage Sale which was rained out^ two weeks ago. The group has added some new items and the sale will he on the parking lot of the prim shop at Tri County Office Equipment on Walnut Avenue Saturday from 8 am. to noon. The proceeds will be used to assit other area assemblies in hosting the Rainbow Grand St# STAMMTISCH, Pag# 2 ;

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