New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, June 26, 1987, Page 5

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

June 26, 1987

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Issue date: Friday, June 26, 1987

Pages available: 40

Previous edition: Thursday, June 25, 1987

Next edition: Sunday, June 28, 1987

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - June 26, 1987, New Braunfels, Texas Herald-/e/(i/ng New Braunfels Te*as1987's record rainfall a blessing, but. Friday June 26.1987 Page 5 By DAVID SFDFNO Associated Press Writer BKJ BAKK, Texas I AIN Three summers ago, Larry Settle, owner of Big I,ake Farm and Ranch feed store, had a tough time making ends meet. the drought that had parched West Texas rangeland forced many ranchers to sell livestock, curtailing their need to buy feed from Settle. Man, it was tough," Settle said, explaining the amount of feed sold during that time was down about 80 percent. The water supply for the town of 8,500 also was dwindling, leading residents to worry and he cautious in their water usage. But today, because of recent rains across the state. Big I-ake’s drinking water supply, like that of other Texas cities, is in good shape. And Settle’s business is back on track. Many rivers, lakes, streams and aquifers are filled to near capacity, but people across the state still are warned about conservation measures. In normally dry West lexas where farmers are accustomed to irrigating their fields, too much rain can be harmful. The late May and early June rains were good for ranchers and city residents, but not for many West Texas farmers who had to replant or put off planting cotton for weeks and now stand to lose millions of dollars Wilbert Braden, who farms about 2,800 acres of cotton, wheat and inilo near Midkiff. south of Midland, said his cotton crop will be late because he had to replant. “Back in the drought years you had black clouds all over and it would never rain Now you see all these blacks clouds and it rains “You think back and ask. Why, good Lord, why during those lean years, why couldn’t it rain'1’ " he said. “I guess a person gets accustomed to the weather out here and when you get the wet weather it’s difficult to handle," Braden said. “The thing about West Texas is when you talk about average you are talking about extremes," said Charles Stichler, an agronomist with the Texas A&M Extension Service in Fort Stockton. “On the weather, you can’t count on anything," he said. "You just never know when you’re going to get a rain or when you’re going to get a drought." Big I^ke, about 80 miles west of San Angelo, has no lake at all. About five miles south of town, a sign on a pasture that fills during heavy thunderstorms makes light of the town’s name. “Who pulled the plug on the Big I^ke’’" the sign reads. Here, the greatest demand for water came in 1983, when oifield roughnecks and town residents began to deplete the community's water supply. We just couldn’t supply all the needs," said Settle, a member of the Reagan County Water Supply District. "Ranchers had to cut back on their stock because there was no rain. The animals were getting too expensive. Several people sold completely out." County residents approved a $2 million bond issue to pay for a new water field at the nearby Rocker B Ranch, and city officials restricted home car washings and lawn watering through 1985, according to city secretary Tony Willie. The town's water field is on the Ogallala Aquifer and is replenished by rainfall. “Now. we have an ample supply of water up until the year 2020," Willie said State Sen. Bill Sims, D-San Angelo, knows about having too much or too little water. Sims’ 25th senatorial district stretches west into El Paso County, south to Del Rio, northeast into the Hill Country and north to Midland County. Sims is a rancher in Concho County and droughts are not new to him The dry summers of 1984 and 1985 were only part of the problem for many farmers and ranchers who went out of business, he said. High interest rates, low prices, and cold winters in 1983 and 1984 were contributing factors, he said. In fiscal 1984 ending in June, 5,610 Texas farmers and ranchers went out of business. That number has risen to 8,960 for 1987 already, before the year ends June 30. according to the American Bankers Association We had four or five elements. Any one of these could have broken us," Sims said. We ourselves were very fortunate that we had enough grass during that time." The city of San Angelo, with a population of 80.000, faced water shortage threats in 1984 and 1985 The three lakes. O.C. Fisher Reservoir, Twin Buttes Reservoir and I^ake Nasworthy. began drying up and water quality deteriorated. Water recreational activities were limited and some water conservation measures were imposed By 1985, city officials were pumping in water from Robert I^e’s i-ake Spence, about 40 miles to the north, but that didn't help water quality much, said San Angelo City Manager Stephen Brown Even with the recent spring rains, which have renewed both the supply and quality of water, the city keeps a watchful eye on its resources and recently banned residents from watering lawns in the afternoon hours during the summer. But across the region, cities like San Angelo are hopeful these days with the groundbreaking of Stacy Dam, a reservoir that will provide drinking water for 500,000 people in West Texas, including Abilene. Midland and San Angelo. The $70 million project, being constructed by Brown and Root Inc. of Houston, should be completed within three years. It took officials from the Colorado River Municipal Water District and numerous West Texas cities IO years to get approval from state and federal officials. The reservoir, to be located near I>eaday. will consist of 19.000 surface acres in Runnels, Concho and Coleman counties, and will have a capacity of 554,000 acre feet of water That compares with 489.000 acre feet of water at I^ake Spence and 204.000 acre feet at Lake Thomas, south of Snyder. “I don’t think you’ll see anybody in West Texas constructing another lake after Stacy," Midland City Manager Fred Poe said “There just aren’t any more rivers to dam up and create a lake “That’s why we fought so hard to get Stacy We just thought it was the last place for another lake Ironically or appropriately, the Stacy Dam groundbreaking ceremony had to be moved to the Ballinger High School parking lot 25 miles away because heavy thunderstorms flooded the reservoir area on May 14 and 15. The rains continued for about a month in parts of West and Central Texas, leaving death and destruction in their wake. In San Antonio, three people died in floods in early June during the city's wettest 30-day period since 1935. San Antonio got 18 41 inches of rain between May 13 and June ll The damage to San Antonio streets because of the rains has topped $2 million Canyon I^ake, near New Braunfels, filled to near capacity and water will be released for the next six weeks, making water sports on that lake and the Guadalupe River dangerous, officials have warned Dear AbbyImpeachment sponsor-issue not immediate need Husband’s Double Lives Will at Some Point Collide DLAR ABBY I am 23. “Elliott” is 45 I am single. Last year he celebrated his 25th wedding anni versary He and his wife get along very well He just happens to love me, too. She knows nothing of me, vet I know so much about her. I have known land loved) Elliott for three years and we have a beautiful 7 month old son. Elliott paid my way through school and helps me with my bills, He never led me to believe he would marry me, and I never pressured him to All I want is for him to tie a part of my son’s life For now, he sees hts s/m every day and loves him very much Elliott is basically living a double life We spend a lot of time together I am a Catholic and know it was wrong to get involved with a married man, but it’s too late to feel guilty now. Abby, should his wife be told about this? I don’t want her to be hurt, but something like this could give her a heart attack Elliott and his wife have a 24 year old son whom I have met. Wouldn't it lie nice if he knew he had a half brother? Should this be brought out in the open? Or is silence the best solution? KEEPING QUIET IN ARIZONA DEAR KEEPING: What are Elliott's thoughts on the matter? And what will you tell your son w hen he gets old enough to know that his “Daddy” is not married to his mother — hut to some other lady? As I see it, if Elliott loves your child and continues to see him daily, there is no way he c an keep the truth from his wife and family. Nor should he. But he should be the one to inform his family. DEAR ABBY: My husband and I live in a nice suburban neighbor hood. Our nextdoor neighbor is a very pleasant young woman who lives alone She comes home from work in the middle of the afternoon and often sunbathes in her yard for an hour We are the only ones who can see into her yard Sometimes she wears a bikini swimsuit and sometimes she wears an ordinary brassiere and a short panty girdle with the garters tucked up out of sight I once made some catty remarks to my husband about the bra and panty girdle outfit, and he asked me to explain what was wrong with it. He said it actually covered about twice as much of her as the bikini What are your thoughts on this0 FRIENDLY NEIGHBOR DEAR NEIGHBOR:    How much is covered is not the issue; more to the point, a bikini is appropriate attire for sunbathing — lingerie is not. However, since your neighbor was sunbathing in the privacy of her own yard (at least she thought she was), she is not accountable for her attire. DEAR ABBY What is wrong with kids today, anyway? I am talking about grandchildren You go to visit friends and their grand children come into the living room and turn on the television so loud you can’t be heard when you talk — and you can’t hear what the other person is saying either' I don’t care for the television programs the kids turn on. Besides, if I wanted to watch television I would have stayed home. Please print this. A lot of people need to see it DISGUSTED DEAR DISGUSTED:    The problem is not the kids — it’s the adults in charge of the kids who permit the kids to run the show. Need Some Relief For Those Headaches? Ever Been To A Chiropractor? DP]AR ABBY: How right you are to point out that constant tickling of i perron is cruelty and should not be tolerated My Irish mother told me at least 50 years ago of a situation that took place near her hometown in Ireland A neighbor had at least two wives pass away before anyone paid much attention to it. Then another neigh bor reported hearing hysterical laughter coming from that house Well, it was later learned that the man had been tying his wives to the bedpost, and tickling the soles of their bare feet with a feather* He continued until the hysteria did them in In truth, they were tickled to death. BAT HOLLINGSWORTH, BRITISH COLUMBIA AUSTIN (AP) — A resolution calling for a legislative inquiry into possible impeachment proceedings against Gov. Bill Clements should wait until budget work is finished, says the chairman of the committee considering the measure “I think we’ve got a lot of other things to do first, like the budget," said Rep Fete I^ney, D-Hale Cepter, chairman of the House State Affairs Committee Reps Paul Moreno. D-El Paso, and Ai Edwards. D-Houston. filed the resolution this week following a Methodist bishops’ report on the Southern Methodist University pay-for-play football scandal. I think that’s an SMU problem until the time that there s something that shows the law’s been broken or something Uke that." I^ney said Thursday. Ut Gov. Bill Hobby sought to downplay the impeachment talk that started when the bishops’ indicated that Clements, as chairman of SMU’s board of governors, tried to cover ud the scheme that led to severest sanctions ever against a collegiate football team Hobby, a Democrat who would become governor if Clements, a Republican, were ousted, said he sees no reason to consider such a move. His administration has been unfortunate for the state, as there have been other unfortunate administrations, but I see no grounds for impeachment.’’ Hobby said “I think the issue is that every time I turn on the 6 or the IO o'clock news, you have first the budget issue and next the impeachment issue So I think it s an issue and I think we ought to address it,’ said Rep I>ena Guerrero. D-Austin NOTICE OF VOTE ON TAX RATE■fi 9Celli The Relief Team!! Whether you suffer from backpain, neckpain, headaches, numbness, dizziness, or lack of energy it s time you got some relief. Professional, comfortable, results- oriented care . . with no otit-of*pocket expense We accept what your qualifying group insurance, auto accident or workers compensation pays as payment in full. Richardson Chiropractic Clinic606 South Walnut - Walnut Square Shopping Center - 629-4488 The New Braunfels Independent School District conducted a public hearing on a proposal to increase your property taxes by 7.975% Thurs., June 25th, 1987, at 7:30 p.m. A public meeting to vote on the tax rate will be held on Monday. June 29th, 1987f at 7:30 p.m.. at the Education Center Library, at 430 E. Mill Street. ;

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