New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, March 10, 1987, Page 3

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - March 10, 1987, New Braunfels, Texas Pat Oassen second from left was the big winner of a new pick up following the 1987 Comal County Community Fund Drive The hoi k was donated by Krueger Chevrolet Milt Ferguson Motor Company Becker Mi' •» Company and Bs.etv et Motors Names of all those on payroll deduction or those who pledged $50 or more were eligible tor the drawing Pictured with Classen are Stan Cunningham Tony Mudford and David lamor all representing Com Fund Photo by Leslie Knewatdt Panel backs increase in higher ed funds AUSTIN AP The House Appropriation* Committee's efforts to write a balanced budget have been made about $.**>0 million rn >re dtf fl« ult bx the House Higher Mui/ati-m Committee The higher education panel Murieta) unanimous!) Un keel a proposed 1988-89 spending: plan thai would add that much b> tlv« plan bat ked bx Xppnpnatmns Cha ira tan Jim Hudd Builds plan would pump about P TO million balk into state universities roughly th** amount c ut .ast v*.*r The higher educ ation panel s plan atilt'- another MW moll mu * for junior rollers Hep Wilhelmina lie. D-Austir. and chairwoman of the higher education committee, said a tax irk Tease possibly the establishment of a state* income tax is needed to give state universities the monev the) need She said the in creased spending is justifiable because higher education has had to take the brunt of the c ut' in the last three terms But Budd I ^Brownfield, 'aul the I »00 million increase is net justifiable Theres no room for that, he said Ka fry one wants lo pass Hie burden on to the appropriations committee They don’t want the heat on themselves The) just figure Gov. Clements apologizes for role in SMU scandal whatever they do is gem* to be redone in appropriations So they 're not even worrying about it They're making friends and expecting us to do the dirt) work. " said Budd Higher education committee member Tom Cher. I)-Ba) Qty. agreed with Ms Delco that Texans would have to dip further into their P«k keLs to fund the additional appropriations recommended by the panel I think th** people are willing to pa) tor whatever state services we need, whether ifs higher education or other areas." he said Speaker (Jib l>ewis. who ha** predicted another tax UU in addition I. the continuation of the current temporary fixes will be needed, said. When you vote for that sizeable increase you hop** th**) are justified It puts a strain on ail the other areas >f f unding in the state lewis ox Bill scandal Southern "agon) role in AUSTIN AP    <i Clements calling th** surrounding c ash given ti-Moth nils! fo »t ba Ii {ii.IV er t**la\ apologized for his continuing those payments I am sorry,' Clements news conference In hmdsu fit clear we were wrong SMI’ is the victim of a system we should have st<>{)p**d immediately dements said h* and »ther members of Un SMI B a .1 t (loxemors, whom he still dec I in* 11> name, erred in deciding to phase ■ut the payments rather tf el slipping them nnilo diatelv I he NI VA has '.arr. -lf ti ... af SMI hr TW as a re' . • 'th. : pro{x*r payments to players the first imposition of Hi*’ mn ailed death penalty dements flu' acknowledged fi. Knew tin payments were being made wfn.e SMI was in N* V V pf af. for prex lous v lolations dements who resigned as hainnan of the SMI hoard t«* t* tiefore sworn in os governor in January said fie was unaware of the pax merits vt hen he re joined the tv..at d in I‘M f Tile canc er was widespread wfieri cir investigators uncovered its full extent in 1984 When we lls. >ver< J Hie payments we decided ti phase the sx stern out." he* said demerits said he never personally made payments, anti fie also insisted that other members of th** school's board of governors knew of arui approved the c ontmued {six merits dements earlier statements that some SMU governors knew of the Continuing payments to players has been disputed by several board members, and the board last week asked turn to name names He didn t today. but said fie expects those names to come out "These are people that in t up) those positions on the t>oard and fiave for some time They are reallv part of the problem at tins point and not part of Hie solution, dements said "They’re going to have to make this decision for themselves I think tfiat in due course they will His voice occasionally cracking, dements said fit* brought the af I air to light last week because fie believed it was necessary to get SMU moving in the right direction "It is critical that the truth prevail. Once aU the facts are out, SMU then will move forward,” he said “The truth must be told and everyone conected with this issue should speak out — and speak out now.” Clements also promised to cooperate with the Methodist Church’s investigation of the SMU affair. In the "pint of helping to ensure the truth in told .md told quickly I will provide th** Meth**iivt (’buri* -Bishops Committee the entire chronology as I re. all it he said He laid out the < hronology in the three-page statement presented at his weekly Capitol news conference t "lay Clements said he returned to ’ < SMI b ar I in January CVC after I «■ iud been defeated in his bid for re-. .< . Hon a' governor of Texas \t that time, I knew nothing >f the baster network and its system of {.Aments t. S\tl f "‘tbail players, fie said. adding ti** fu*. ame aware ' me thing was wrong in th** fall of l‘*H4 1'hls is the kev date to the entire affair k »r th* first time w« began to mderstand th** problem and start thinking in terms of,» solution lf was * Iear an investigation was necessarv We meaning several members of til** board .*nd ad ministration found out boosters were making payments to some 26 athletes. Clements said Shin ked that such practices were k < urrmg, appalled to find out through investigation that such a system Iud been established and ongoing since the uud-Ttts. we were deternuned to put an end to it and i * turn to a sy stem of full compliance and integrity \tler much discussion, and mu* ti agonizing, we ch.na* a phase-out system We did it reluctantly and uncomfortably, but feeling this approach would be in tfu* best interest of SMU. tfu Dallas tv in-m unity, the players and their families ’* Clements said HUNTSVILLE * AP» - A SI 37 billion budget request approved bx the Texas Board of Corrections includes money to build two maximum security prisons and five new trusty camps, but the new facilities would not give the system enough beds to meet anticipated growth bx 1990 Board members Tuesday approved the budget request, but they also voted to end the annual Texas Prison Rodeo if a private organization is not found within the next 90 days to take over financing of the 55-year tradition The budget request to the legislature totals $790 4 million rn 1988 and $582.6 million in 1989. compared to the $48* 6 million being spent this year But despite the requested increases. Chairman Alfred Hughes said the system bx then would be in worse condition than it is now We’re not even budgeting any dollars for any new salaries for prisons until 1989. he said "We’re looking at a long-term problem There’s a lot of ta IR in the legislature now but we don't have one single cont now budgeted to build any new facilities that adds one person to our population " The request asKs for ll R million for two more maximum security prisons and $6 b million for five trusty camps The two prisons would add 4.500 beds while th** camps would add I .OOO beds However according to the budget request approved bx the b*»ard. the department still would be more than 10.000 beds short of projections of Supporting children anticipated growth by 1990 "No question about that,” Hughes said "We’re not saying we're going to get there. We don't think it's appropriate for us to ask -from the legislature i for what we're pretty comfortable we can’t get." Asked to assess the prison system by then, he replied: "I think we ll probably be in worse condition." The request also seeks about $8 million each year for payments to released inmates and projects the release of 40,292 inmates each year We went with a budget we felt we needed to have." Hughes said "If the legislature gives it to us. we ll have the dollars If they don’t give us the money, then the federal courts will come in and take over and run our prisons and charge the state for it " Texas already is operating its prisons under a court order which, among other things, resulted in limiting the inmate population to 95 percent of capacity to ease crowding. For the past five weeks, the 26-unit system has been open to new admissions only two days a week because the population has exceeded that 95 percent cap The prisons were reopening today, repeating the recent routine, after the release of hundreds of inmates over the weekend The population taken at midnight Sunday and released Monday af-temsHin totaled 37.984 inmates, or 93 95 percent of capacity, TDC spokesman David Nunnelee said That number wa< 425 under the 95 percent cap Nunnelee said the prison system le.c ProcBd/ka president of Preceptor Rho chapter of Beta Sigma Pin presented the Comal County Child Welfare B afd a check for $100 to go toward the funding of a children s shelter in New Braunfels In turn Barry Allison president of the Child Welfare Board presented Preceptor Rho a certificate for their donation Photo by Leslie Knewaldt HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MEDICATION STUDY Individuals between the ages of 21 - 60 with mild to moderate high blood pressure are needed for a clinical study on a new medication. Participants will be paid. If interested, please call 625-7612. 705 Lancia WEDDINGS? CLUB NOTES? Call WANDA LASATER. Lifestyles Editor at 625-9145. Hvrald-Zritung ’NC NAMI »0 IOO* IO* N iuSDS Mini-Blinds 60% oh 7 Best Colors Rhoads Interiors 943 N. Walnut New Braunfels M N W F 1:30 5 30 nun ta 7:00 SU. 10:00-4:00 Call 625-3477 could be closed again by the end of the working day Wednesday if it receives the usual large number of new admissions hughes said he saw no end to the repeated opening and closing of the system "We won’t see it until the legislature funds us money to build new prisons," he said. The state has until April I to show U S. District Judge William Wayne Justice that it should not be fined nearly SI million a day for failing to comply with reforms he has ordered State attorneys next week will be appealing the contempt fines to the 5th U S Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans • I think we're in pretty good shape, except for medical," Hughes said. noting that the department was negotiating with the University af Texas Medical Branch to take over the prison system's medical operations. ‘ We've done everything we can," he said "We've shown to the courts we've made giant steps toward compliance." Meanwhile, the rodeo demise was an easy decision because the department has so many more pressing issues. Hughes said. We d like to keep it here but we didn t see much support among the local community." he said The rodeo, which has put some ll 5 million into the prison education and recreation fund over the past IO years, never has posted a loss in recent times, said rodeo director Jav Byrd Hvrald-Zeitung lUSPS 377 800) Published Sonaay morning tuesday Wednesday. Thursday and Friday afternoons by New Braunfels Herald Publishing Co 186 S Casten Ave or PO Drawer 311328 New Braunfels. Te*as 78131 1328 Second Cass hostage paid by New Braunfels Herald Publishing Co at New Braunfels Texas DAVID KRAMER Editor and Pubtisner JIM WEBRE Managing Editor DEBORAH lAARENCE Office Manager SANDI HUTTER Retail Advertising Manager CHERYL MCCAMPBELL Classified Manager CAROL AVERY Circulation Manager MAGGIE LOMBARDO Composition Foreman GUS ELBEL Pressroom Foreman DANA OVERSTREET City Editor WANDA LASATER l testyies Editor TOM LABINSKI Sports Editor Subscription Rates I includes applicable sales tan) Carrier delivery in Comal. Guadalupe Hays, Bianco and Kendall counties three months, SIO 89 sin months, 119 02 one year $34 Senior Citizens Discount learner delivery only) sin mon tbs HS 83 one year $28 69 Mail delivery outside Comal County, in Tenas three months. $19 13 si* months $34 one year, $63 75 Mail outside Tenas si* months, > $42 one year $70 it you have not received your newspaper by 5 30 p rn Tuesday through Friday, or by 7 30 a m I Sunday, call 625 9144 or 658 1900 by 7 p m and Ham, respective I,y Postmaster Send addrest changes to PO Drawer 311328, New Braunfels, Texas 78131 1328 By JOHN KASTNER Correspondent Rumors circulating last week that Marion Police Chief Mike Earl had been suspended until a review of job performance can be made has now been confirmed, according to Guadalupe County District Attorney Bud Kirkendall. Both Marion Mayor Clarence Jackson and city attorney Robert Raetzsch have declined comment on the matter as of presstime today. Kirkendall Monday revealed that his office is currently conducting the investigation involving Earl, who has been suspended with pay by city officials. Kirkendall, who was present at last week’s city council meeting, refused to comment; however, he did con firm a statement made by Jackson following the council’s executive session that Earl should be suspended pending a "job performance evaluation” recommendation handed to the council by city attorney Raetzsch. One unconfirmed report stated that Earl had been suspended following allegations made bv an unidentified man following a traffic accident in the city. Earl was contacted Monday afternoon and explained that none of the city officials have indicated the reason he hs been suspeneded, but that it probably had to do with a recent wreck that occurred in the Marion area. Earl was told Kirkendall would confer with him later after he obtains an attorney; however, there are no indications of how long the in vestigation might take. "They haven’t really told me anything,” he said. The chief said he is unaware of any formal charges at this point. "They haven’t brought any charges that I know of at this time. Ifs really kind of in limbo,” he said. "I’ve never had anything like this happen to me. I’m just amazed — I just can’t believe it,” the chief continued. "People can accuse you of anything and if they suspended an officer every time he’s accused of anything, pretty soon, the streets would be empty.” Earl, who has been police chief of Marion for two years and two months, served some IO years in civilian law enforcement service and now will be replaced by reserve office Buddy Rutherford during the investigation. State prison board approves $1.37 billion budget request ComFund pick-up HmwM-Z*tung, Now Braunfels Texas    Tuesday.    March    10.1987    Page    3 Marion police chief suspended ;

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