New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 20, 1987

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

January 20, 1987

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Issue date: Tuesday, January 20, 1987

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Sunday, January 18, 1987

Next edition: Wednesday, January 21, 1987

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 20, 1987, New Braunfels, Texas 4 10    110 5 3    10/22/99 EMF I FE MICROFILM CO P.O. POX 816423 DALLAS, TX 75381Brotze Rice bound, Page 5 / 'Airplane'crashes, Page 2 / Royko on knuckles, Page 4 New BraunfelsTuesdayJanuary 20, 1987 25 CentsOne Section, IO Pages N B high schools see fewer drop outs Hispanic students leave classes behind twice as often as their Anglo counterparts By SARAH DUKE Staff Writer Local Hispanic students are dropping out of high school at a rate twice that of their white classmates Since September. 47 students have dropped out of New Braunfels High School -26 of those students were Hispanic With an enrollment of 1.375, New Braunfels’ student body is 34 percent Hispanic, yet 55 percent of those students leaving school were Hispanic. The drop-out rate for Hispanics at NBHS is 5 percent com Gumbgrt H E. “Eddie” Gumbert Jr. of Wimberley has been elected chairman of the board of the Guadalupe-Bianco River Authority. “I will try to carry on the office as my predecessors have done,” Gumbert said during the board meeting last weak. Gumbert is involved In real sri att development In Hays County and has served en the board since 1977. Gumbert said his prime roneate la to fortis it effort# to construct a hydroelectric plant at Canyon Dem. He has served as vice chairman of tho board and replaces Preston Stofsr of Long Mott as chairman. “Whan I took the chair, I had some "We try to make them realize that there's not much they can do without a high school diploma." Will Krieg CHS principal pared to 2.4 percent for white students As the largest high school in Comal Taylor goals and I’ve accomplished all but about two of them,” Stofer said. He added that he was disappointed that the hydro protect had not progressed further under his leadership. A.C. Schwetheim. director from Kendall County, said he thinks the river authority has made significant progress in the past year. “Our chairman has made some substantial steps toward completion of the hydro protect and Is getting a water treatment plant underway,” he said. The river authority is building a new wastewater traatmont plant near Northdifie subdivision. "This board has always worked very closely together and I think we County, New Braunfels leads the county with the highest percentage of dropouts, 21 percent. Smithson Valley High School has seen seven students drop out since the beginning of the school year in September, translating into a dropout rate of less than I percent. Canyon High School has lost 13 students, or 16 percent of the student body, to the ranks of drop outs Although local educators are working to keep every student in school, local drop-out rates are far lower than the statewide average The In-officers Cbgngult can do that with this new chairman,” Schwetheim said. John Taylor of McQueeney was named vice chairman of the board after being nominated by Elliot Kook of New Braunfels. Taylor is a state director of the Texas Newspaper Advertising Bureau. He served on the board from IVR to 1671 and was reappointed in IMI Kathryn Chanautt of Gonzales was named secietary-treasurer of the board. OBRA General Manager John Specht commended the new officers on their courage. “They are compting responsibility for a little more than SUO million in aeeeta,” he caid. tercuttural Development Research Association, a private research firm in San Antonio, released a study last October showing that roughly 33 percent of all students who start the ninth grade in Texas do not graduate. Statewide. 45 percent of Hispanic students drop out compared to 27 percent of white students and 34 percent of blacks. Miriam Campos, New Braunfels Independent School District’s truant officer, said the No. I reason students cite for dropping out of school is poor attendance. That reason includes a variety of meanings. Campos said, but usually it means the students have gotten so far behind in their See DROPOUT, Page 2 Low self-esteem cited as reason for leaving By SARAH DUKE Staff Writer A large number of students who drop out of high school do so because they lack the self-esteem to keep up with their classmates and live up to their potential. That’s the opinion of Nancy Ney. director of Teen Connection alternative school and group foster home. “Some of these kids have had a lifetime of low self esteem," she said. “Sometimes, it’s a combination of ignorance and low selfesteem. They just don’t think they’re capable enough to ever make it. “Students very often have a narrow range of information.” Ney added. “They don’t realize what opportunities are out there . They live in a cocoon where everyone they know has done the same thing and they think they’re going to do that same thing.” the alternative school teaches hip    students    who have been referred by the New Braunfels High School. Since it opened in IMI, about 117 studmRs have attended |,|t— at the alternative school. Those students wise referred because they needed individual attention that i«ff rf m ****##** ffiuMp't offer or became they were smpmded from school, Ney said. The school's director said th#* although she has no way of knowing he— many of those studmts have graduated from high school, Me forts the school has prevented several students from giving up on education and themselves. “It's really hard to totally define how we impact the drop-out rate, but we feel a lot of our students would have dropped out if they hadn’t come here.” she said Students at the alternative school generally stay from three to nine weeks. “What we do is try to get them ready for the mainstream again,” she said. Teachers accomplish that goal by working with the students on an individualized basis. There are no more than IO students in a class, Ney said. Students and their parents can receive individual and group counseling. Ney said some of the students have such poor self-images when they get to the school that they have trouble relating to other people. Often, she said, they will avoid eye contact and rarely speak. Occasionally, she said, she sam students “bloom” in the accepting and positive environment of the school . “Those make you feel very good,” she said. “It’s like watching a flower bloom Those can go back to school and be successful because they believe they’re successful. But Ney said the school Is not always successful. “‘Sometimes, once they get here, they like it and they want to go back to school,” she said. “Others, they're Juet biding their tim# until they’re old enouMi to get out. ” The major reason why students are moved to the alternative school is because of truancy, Ney said. “Borne of them are truant a lot became they’re feeling ever whelmed at school. Boflmnaadtha individualised attention.” she said. GBRA elects new r StammtischJ    r CAD's directors to consider ARB New Braunfels Utilities is holding a meeting to tell all the folks in the West End about soon-to-begin repairs to the sewer system in that part of town. Bob Sohn, NBU’s general manager, said the work will go on for several months and could cause some inconvenience of the residents of that area. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at Holy Family Church, 245 S. Hidalgo. Sohn said he plans to outline the work schedule for concerned residents. This relates to drainage, too.... Up With People will be Feb. IO at the Civic Center and will feature the B Cast of more than IOO performers from 30 states and 15 foreign countries. The first half of the show will feature tunes and entertainment circa 1940s, 1950s, 1960s and into the 1900s. The second half of the performance will be a humdinger featuring international talent and dances from around the world. Neat, huh? Okay, New Braunfels, they need help. Host families, people willing to house and feed once or twice a day the performers, all fine young people for whom the Greater New Braunfels Chamber of Commerce is vouching. The cast arrives in town the 8th, departs the lith. To arrange things as a host family, call the chamber at 625-2385 and ask for Be-Jay or Mr. Bohannon. This will be a good show with lots of boogie. Tickets are available through the chamber and at area merchants. Cost is $7 for adults, 15 for students and senior citizens. A dollar discount is available for those who buy their tickets in advance ... Rachelle Klepak. a former partner in the not out’of-business Jacob Mendlovitz store at 180-194 San Antonio, wants everyone to know that the store is not in business, will not reopen and has sold all its stock to Rudy Kahn, owner and operator of Acme Merchandising Co. of El Paso. Seems there was some confusion about whether the store had actually closed based on Kahn's statements that he was here to close out the inventory Kahn has purchased all remaining Mendlovitz stock and will bring in some of his own to sell within the month. For the record, the partnership of Klepak and Max H. Mendlovitz, brother and sister, is no mom, kaput, no longer in existence, all according to the laws of the state.... Board set to cull chief appraiser applicants Wednesday, Saturday Election of new officers will be the first order of business for the The Comal Appraisal District’s board of directors when it meets Wednesday. The board will also consider an appointment of a 1987 Appraisal Review Board. The board will meet at 7:30 p m Wednesday at the appraisal district office at 644 N. Loop 337. In other action, the board also will consider a budget amendment to the 1986 budget allowing for payment of architectural and audit services. Also Wednesday, the board likely will go in to executive session to discuss appointing a chief appraiser. Pat Fox has been acting chief appraiser since Glenn Brucks resigned from that position. The board meets again at 9 a m. Saturday at the appraisal district office to hold another executive session to conduct interviews with prospective applicants for the chief appraiser position The board has been criticized by the district’s landlord, Rick Seidel. See CAD, Page 2 For those of you with arthritis, that mucho ouch in the morning and at times when we really, really need louse our limbs and joints is aggravating. There is help. Sponsored by the Arthritis Foundation, Physical Therapy Unlimited and Comal County Community Education Program, a self-help course designed by professionals will provide information about the disease, how to appropriately exercise to lessen its effects, use of relaxation techniques, how to work with your doctor and ways to cope with the Big A in general. Gasses start Jan. 31 and pre-registration is necessary. For more information, call Robert Rodriguez at 625-7300 of the Community Education office at 625-0061. Might not be a bad idea for non-arthritic folks, either ... Guadalupe Taxpayers Association will meet on the topic “Petitioning to Retire in Peace Jan 26 in McQueeney. The meeting had been scheduled for Wednesday. Jan. 21, but that is cancelled. Meeting Jan. m will begin about 7:30 p.m. at the Lions Glib on FM 78. “Rendition is the first line of defense.” says W.R. Tatum, association president. Proposed legislation now pending before the Texas legislature also will be discussed ... ThtMgmi CLASSIFIED............6-10 COMICS* »•••••••••••••••• 4*7 CROSS WOR D. DIAB ARRY EDUCATION.. ORITUARIRS. OPINIONS.................4 SPORTS....................S N BPD offers reward in Martinez slaying Angelo A. Cassaburri, an aerospace education specialist with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, speaks to students at Lone Star Elementary School Monday. Cassaburri stresses that NASA is eeevk cumm/sm* more than a rocket factory and researches a variety of aeronautics phenomenon and engineering. For a complete story on Cassaburri's visit, see Kaleidoscope in Sun day's Herald Zv it jog. New Braunfels police are seeking information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person, or persons, responsible for the Dec. 28 slaying of Comal County resident Jose Martinez in the New Braunfels-Com&l County Crime Stoppers crime of the week. A reward of up to 61,000 is being offered until Jan 30 for information on this week s case Crime Stoppers pays for information on any felony case and callers are not required to give their name Call 620-TIPS and speak to the officer on duty. The body of the 75-year-old rural Comal County resident was discovered on the Union Pacific railroad tracks near Goodwin Lane at 12:37 a rn Dec 28 His 1963 GMC pick up truck, believed taken by hit assailants, was later found in Seguin. Martinez died as a result of severe injuries to the head, believed to have been caused by blows from a blunt instrument ;

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