New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, February 15, 1985, Page 6

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

February 15, 1985

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Issue date: Friday, February 15, 1985

Pages available: 48

Previous edition: Thursday, February 14, 1985

Next edition: Sunday, February 17, 1985 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

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Publication name: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Pages available: 318,726

Years available: 1952 - 2013

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New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - February 15, 1985, New Braunfels, Texas Wholesale prices remain stable in January WASHINGTON (AP) - Wholesale prices, beginning the year on an encouraging note, held flat in January, the government said today. Energy prices posted their steepest drop in almost two years while food costs abo declined sharply. It was the third time in the last five months that the overall index showed no increase. While most economists foresee a price rise of 2 percent for all of 1965, (me said that, over the next few months, “it is hard to believe that we will see any significant increase.” That optimism is based on sagging worldwide oil prices and the continued strength of the dollar, which hit new highs against foreign currencies again this week. As for last month, energy prices fell 2.4 percent, the biggest decline since a 3 percent drop in March 1983. Gasoline prices fell 2.7 percent while home heating oil prices were off 2.3 percent. Both declines were the steepest since August. At the wholesale level, gasoline is now 6.7 percent cheaper than it was just a year ago. Food prices fell 0.6 percent in January, their best performance since a 0.8 percent decline last May. That drop was largely the product of a 21.3 percent fall in egg prices, the steepest decline for any category in the index. Analysts credit that drop to higher production at a time of weak demand. Fresh fruit prices rose 3.7 percent, the biggest increase for any food category. Experts said the February rise would likely be even higher as the January price survey was done before the devastating freeze hit Florida’s citrus-growing areas. Vegetable prices dropped 3.6 percent last month but experts ag Un pointed to the Florida freeze and said consumers could soon see increases in vegetable prices. The good news on energy and food prices was tempered somewhat by higher prices for new cars and trucks. Both posted price hikes of 2.2 percent. In releasing today’s report, the Labor Department said that if prices held steady for a full year at January’s level, wholesale costs would actually fall 0.4 percent. That figure is based on a more precise calculation of monthly prices than the figure made public. In all, the Producer Price Index for finished goods stood at 292.7 in December, meaning that goods costing $10 in 1967 would have cost $29.27 last month. Prices rose a slight 0.2 percent December and 0.3 percent in November. For all of 1984, prices rose just 1.8 percent. That performance, combined with an even smaller 0.6 percent increase in 1983, meant the United States enjoyed the best two-year inflation performance in two decades. The department gave these other details of January price activity: —Natural gas prices dropped 1.8 percent and are now 1.5 percent below their level of a year ago. In truth, the energy price calculations reported today were for December. That component of the wholesale measure lags a month behind because energy companies report their prices too late for inclusion in the most recent index. Satellite reveals aurora power source PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Scientists for the first time have located a huge, egg-shaped power supply in space that helps create the Northern and Southern Lights, the mysterious curtains of green light that shimmer around Earth’s poles. The power source is an invisible zone 20 to 30 times the size of Earth, and is located about 400,000 miles distant, always on the side of the Earth away from the sun, University of Iowa physicist Lou Frank said Thursday. It uses magnetic forces to trap electrically charged particles from the solar wind, a hot, particle-laden gas that speeds from the sun at nearly I million mph, Frank said. “It (the power supply zone) really dances around out there,” said Frank, who presented his findings at Jet Propulsion Laboratory during an international conference on solar wind interaction with Earth’s magnetic field. Frank said the most detailed ultraviolet and visible light satellite photos ever made of the Northern and Southern Lights allowed researchers to calculate the location of the power source in the Earth’s magnetic “tail.” The tail is the 4-million-mile-long part of Earth’s magnetic field blown away from the planet by solar wind. From the ground, the Northern and Southern Lights — also called the aurora borealis and aurora australis — usually are visible from high latitudes as “a series of (60- to 70-mile-tall) green curtains marching and waving across the sky,” Frank said, although they also may appear as a red glow. The Northern and Southern Lights occur because solar wind pushes the magnetic field around the Earth to create an electric voltage, or power supply, in the magnetic tail, he said. Through a complex series of reactions, the voltage accelerates the particles into Earth’s polar regions, where they funnel into the atmosphere and are illuminated to create the lights. Just as a television picture is produced by electrically charged particles shot onto a TV screen, the auroras are basically pictures produced on “Mother Nature’s TV set” Mother of transplant patient weds DALLAS (AP) — One year to the day after Stormie Jones underwent the world’s first simultaneous heart-liver transplant, her mother helped make sure Stormie will never forget the anniversary of starting a new life. Ix)is “Susie” Jones, 28, wed telephone salesman Greg Browning on Thursday, Valentine’s Day. Browning, 25, insisted afterwards that he didn’t realize Stormie’s historic operation was on Valentine’s Day 1984 when he asked Mrs. Jones to marry him on Thursday. “But it’s for sure that I won’t forget our anniversary now,” he said. “It’s a triple decker.” In a local church filled with as many television cameras and reporters as guests, the couple grinned broadly and held hands throughout the 15-minute ceremony performed by the Rev. Fred W. Green. Stormie was decked out in a lacy pink dress and shiny white shoes, one of which slipped off as she stumbled over a step on her way to the altar. Several of the bridesmaids giggled when, moments later, Stormie's mother did the same. The service — for Mrs. Browning’s second marriage and Browning’s first — celebrated love in honor of the marriage and Valentine’s Day and life in honor of Stormie. The chubby, blond-haired, browneyed child, as usual, had little to say to the reporters who mobbed her after the ceremony. “I’m happy,” she murmured demurely. “I have my heart and liver transplant and Valentine’s Day, too.” Stormie suffered from a rare congenital disease that had increased the cholesterol in her blood to nearly IO times the normal level. She underwent the double transplant in Pittsburgh. Third patient chosen for heart transplant LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - A 58-year-old retired assembly line worker will undergo an artificial heart implant operation Sunday at the Humana Heart Institute International, doctors said today. Murray P. Haydon, 58, of Louisville, has had chronic congestive heart disease of an unknown cause since 1981, said Dr. William C. DeVries. Ky: C. DeVries. Haydon had been receiving medication for the illness, but the drugs are now ineffective, DeVries said in a one-page statement issued by the institute. He was admitted Wednesday to Humana Hospital Audubon, where the operation will be performed. DeVries and other members of the hospital’s heart team reviewed Haydon’s medical records and interviewed him before he was admitted. He underwent additional testing and was approved as an implant candidate by the hospital’s evaluation committee on Thursday, the statement said. Doctors will implant the Jarvik-7 DeVries and other members of the hospital’s heart team reviewed Haydon’s medical records and interviewed him before he was admitted. He underwent additional testing and was approved as an implant candidate by the hospital’s evaluation committee sday, the said. on Thur-statement plastic and metal device in Haydon. The same kind of unit was implanted in William J. Schroeder on Nov. 25. Schroeder, who celebrated his 53rd birthday Thursday, remains a patient at the hospital. MRS. RAINBOW Invites you in her private home for Palm, Tarot Card, Readings, All Readings Private & Confidential. 625-5667 $10 with this couponAttorney general pleased with anti-drug trafficking efforts WASHINGTON (AP) - The abduction of an American narcotics agent In Mexico shows the United States is “succeeding in our efforts” to combat international drug trafficking, Attorney General William French Smith says. Pledging to do all in his power to apprehend those who kidnapped Enrique Salazar Camarera, Smith said “the full weight of the United States government stands behind the work of our agents throughout the world." Smith’s statement Thursday came as the Justice Department released the contents of a cable he had sent earlier to his Mexican counterpart. • “We have committed every available resource to this matter, and are willing to make available to you and your government whatever resources are necessary,” Smith told Attorney General Sergio Garcia Ramirez. The cable was released by the Justice Department a week after Camarena, a 37-year-old agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration, was forced into a car by four suspected drug traffickers in Guadalajara, Mexico. The incident is the first suspected kidnapping of a DEA agent in Mexico. Camarena hasn’t been seen or heard from since. Nor have United States or Mexican authorities received any ransom demands from his captors, officials have said. The U.S. Embassy in Mexico Qty has offered a $50,000 reward for information about his abduction. In his cable to Garcia, Smith said: “I urge you to follow every lead, commit every resource and affirm your president’s (Miguel de la Madrid) commitment to combat the actions of these narcotics traffickers. “This offensive action is a showing of strength by these traffickers and we cannot, and will not, stand idly by and allow these groups to attempt to destabilize our government’s efforts in the war against drug trafficking,” it said. In a separate statement, Smith said, “Such acts of violence demonstrate that we are succeeding in our efforts.” conomy Furniture of&guin SAVE UP TO *321.95 ON A PREMIUM KING KOIL CHIROPRACTIC BEDDING SET Featunng an innerspring unit with heavier coils in the center Vs where your heaviest wei^it is concentrated You gat firm level support for a sag-free comfortable night s rest Fle<-Edge border supports provide full width sleeping and firm sitting edge. KING KOIL Ea Pc In Set* FULL Req $224 95 QUEEN ‘338 Reg $559 95 KING Reg $799 95 TWIN SETS FROM AS LOW AS $49 EA. PC. 4*"^ Economy 2,1 w «-»* I "HP Furniture Open tills p m &»7«7 *478 Woman sentenced in case of cruelty to horses New Braunfels Seguin Premier Speialty Stores FOR TWO DAYS ONLY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 UNPRECEDENTED SAVINGS! AIL Merchandise * at Both Demon s Stores will be 20% Off Regular Price. That's right... Every item in Denson's vast stock is on sale... Your choice from Hummels to Hallmark. Linens to Precious Moments Figurines, Andrea porcelains. Sabino Crystal, and Llardro to paper-by-the pound. Framed prints to Silk Flowers... Crabtree and Evelyn soaps to Mens Specialities. ...items that are Never on sale Are on Sale. Use Your Mastercard, Visa, American Express. Cash, or Check...All Sales Are Final...No Layaways, Holds, or Special Orders. Sale includes jill stock on hand. Sale Begins at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, February 16 and ends at 6:00 p.m. Monday Feb. 18.    What    are    you    waiting    for? • Except Waterford Cry etal Premier Speialty Stores 173 S. Seguin at Landauurfc Square Swill 1419 E. Court Plaza del Rey Center HOUSTON (AP) — A woman convicted of cruelty to animals after 31 sick and starving horses were seized by authorities has been sentenced to one-year probation and ordered to pay a $250 fine. Johnnie Riley, 56, also was ordered by visiting Court-at-Law Judge Rya Montgomery to perform 50 hours of community service as part of her sentence. The judge on Wednesday found Ms. Riley guilty of the misdemeanor charge, which was punishable by up to one year in jail and a maximum $2,000 fine. Ms. Riley was accused of neglecting the horses she kept on a 37-acre lot in northwest Harris County. She wore a hospital bracelet to her sentencing Thursday and clutched a nausea tray as the judge announced ber punishment. Defense attorney Darryl Campbell said his client had checked into Ben Taub Hospital earlier in the day, complaining of a headache and chest pain. When the judge read the guilty verdict a day earlier, Ms. Riley shrieked and struck her head as her chair tipped over. She then sat up and said, “I can’t help it if horses get sick and lose weight.” During Ms. Riley’s trial, veterinarian Frank Martin testified that when 31 horses were confiscated from Ms. Riley’s property on Jan. 31, 1184, most of them were about 300 INVENTORY REDUCTION pounds too light. Martin said ll of the animals were destroyed because they had a contagious form of anemia, and the others have recovered. Kelly Baehr, who worked for Riley shortly before the confiscation, said she was told to feed the horses four pounds of grain a day. Veterinarians testified the animals require IO pounds to 12 pounds of grain daily to stay health. Veterinarian Vickie Lawrence said she complained repeatedly to authorities about the horses. “You could count the ribs on about all of them,” Ms. Lawrence said. Ms. Riley testified the animals lost weight after she gave them worming medicine, and they developed diarrhea. “I love my horses — that’s been my life,” Ms. Riley said. “I’ve been taking care of my horses 20 years." AN UNPRECEDENTED SALE...AND YOU ARE INVITED TO ENJOY THE SAVINGS ON EVERYTHING IN THE STORES. ;