New Braunfels Herald Zeitung, January 19, 1984, Page 16

Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung January 19, 1984

New Braunfels Herald Zeitung (Newspaper) - January 19, 1984, New Braunfels, Texas 16 New Braunfels Herald-Ze/fi/ny Thursday, January 19,1984 ★ CISD- Continued from Page I and give this thing a ‘correcting time.’ We abided by that, mostly out of respect for Col. (Robert) Van Horn. But while we’re waiting for some correction, we get hit with a two-year contract extension and a $4,000-a-year raise. “If people believe in democracy, they’ve got to be disappointed. The board didn’t have to extend Willhelm’s contract Tuesday night. They should have waited until after the April election.” Casted asked two different people Tuesday night if Willhelm’s contract was up for an extension. She said both, including one board member, told her it was a routine evaluation done every January on the superintendent’s performance. Trustee David Boatner said Wednesday that Willhelm’s contract was extended until July I, 1987, because “we feel he is heading the district in the direction we want.” “Who’s ‘we?’, Casteel asked. I understand there are people who support Willhelm, and the Concerned Taxpayers aren’t all the people. But there’s an election in April that could have decided all this. “If his supporters were elected, then Willhelm would be entitled to an extension and a raise. But if two or three people who represent the idea that CISD needs better leadership get elected, then they’ve already got a superintendent who’s out-of-tune with his board.” CISD fell victim to about eight months of controversy in 1983, fueled by a final exam interruption by two board members. Lack of communication between Willhelm, the board and CISD personnel seemed to snowball the district’s predictament, so an 11-member advisory committee was given the task of sorting out actual short-comings and suggesting Working Uke beavers Willhelm’s contract was to expire on July I, 1985, but with the board’s action, that date has been extended until July I, 1987. Boatner also justified the $4.000-a-year raise because Willhelm was not given one last year. some solutions. That committee completed its job in October, Its chairman, Col. Van Horn, died on Thanksgiving Day. The letters Casteel’s group promised to make public raise some questions about salary discrepancies, no substitutes for secretaries and aides, and legal costs for pending suits against CISD. “We mailed them our concerns so they would have the opportunity to take the necessary steps to correct these things without any outside pressure from the public,” Casteel said. “That’s the way the Advisory Committee wanted it, but now we’ve been betrayed in the process.”★ General Continued from Page I No drugs or alcohol were found in the general’s body, DiMaio added. “Occassionally suicides are bizarre,” he said. “These people who do this are under great emotional stress. Sometimes what they do doesn't make sense. He probably thought it might just pass off as a terrorist killing.” Two generals have been provided with bullet-proof vests at Fort Sam Houston, where an Army Reserve two-star general was found bound and hanged last week, authorities said. But a base spokesman downplayed any connection between the two matters, calling the protective gear merely a “precautionary measure.” The vests have been issued to Maj. Gen. Floyd Baker and Brig. Gen. Bill B. Defiler, commander and deputy commander of the U.S. Army Health Services Command, spokesman Col. Nelson Marsh said Wednesday. Marsh downplayed any connection between the purchase of the protective clothing and the death of Ownby. Marsh said Baker and Leffler had been unaware that the vests were purchased. “They did not order the body protection. It was done by the staff as a precautionary measure,” he said. “There have been no threats, but I think people are still shook up over Maj. Gen. Ownby’s death.” The spokesman said the armor still remained in its plastic wrapper. Contractors poured concrete last week for a dam, which will someday hold back the smaller of two man-made lakes in Forest Waters subdivision. The lakes will cover 10 acres of poorly-drained, formerly marshy land. A community clubhouse and recreation center will be built overlooking this lake. Symbols of Independence. Variable rate U.S. Savings Bonds. ★Jones. Continued from Page I tifying the jurors could "place an undue hardship on those people.” Kerr County District Attorney Ron Sutton was more specific about the possible problems. “There may be some crazy in the middle of the night call up and say, 'You better do this, that or the other,’” he told reporters. The microbiolgist said she worked in cancer research at the famed Mayo Clinic in Minnesota before moving to Central Texas, where she worked in quality assurance at a laboratory where intravenous solutions are made. She said her degree in medical microbiology involved the study of “microorganisms that cause disease.” The jurors are a varied lot, including a pastor's wife and the wife of a retired Air Force fighter pilot. Mrs. Alexander, whose daughter Petti was Chelsea s mother, said she thinks a parent can better understand the “special bond” between parents and children. She said her daughter will testify here. “It’s been tough on everyone since the day she died," said Mrs. Alexander, who last saw Chelsea six days before the girl died. Asked what she thought when looking at Ms. Jones, Mrs. Alexander said, “I went to all the pretrial hearings. I’ve looked at her. There’s no definable word for it. I just look." Does she think Ms. Jones murdered her granddaughter? "I won’t answer that because I don’t know,” she said. The Jones trial was moved to Georgetown from Kerrville because of extensive publicity. Ms. Jones was indicted in the September 1982 infant death after an investigation of a series of mysterious illnesses of young children in San Antonio and Kerrville. She also faces charges of injuring several children in her care. The McClellan child died in an ambulance after suffering a seizure at the Kerrville clinic where Ms. Jones worked. Ms. Jones also is charged in Bexar County with administering life-threatening injections to a month-old boy at the pediatric intensive care unit of San Antonio’s Medical Center Hospital, where she was employed before moving to Kerrville. ★Trees Continued from Page I hoping that it won’t get in the way of any construction. He did the same thing with two venerable oaks off Tree Top Lane. "It’s been a labor of love for him," said Barranco’s wife, Kathy. Barranco wasn’t a close friend of Holzapfel’s, but he’s heard a lot about him from other Garden Ridge residents. “I dare say most of his contemporaries around here thought he was a little crazy,” said Edda Buchner, who bought and is rn the process of restoring the doctor’s old house “A lot of ranchers around here, they had logging crews just coming in to cut down everything. iHolzapfel) approached things in a different way. “He was aware, when he left the land to Boysville, that it would be sold and eventually become part of the city. He knew that times were changing,” added Buchner She said she was glad Barranco got the land, and thinks that Hoizapfel would approve of what he’s doing with it. “He really takes the utmost care to preserve the romantic flavor of the land, with winding roads and all that. I would have hated to see it chopped up in squares,” said Buchner — DYANNE FRY LOOK! It'* a bird! It’a a plane! Na, if’a a more-for-your-money finagled ad. Herald-Zietuag 0’983 H J Reynolds Tobacco Co Another first. CENTURY 100 s Taste that delivers IN THE MONEY SAVING Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health LIGHTS IO mg "tar". 0 8 mg nicotine, LIGHTS 100's I? mg "tar", 0 9 mg nicotine, FILTER 15 mg "tar", 11 mg nicotine, FILTER 100 s 16 mg "tar". I 2 mg nicotine av per cigarette by FTC method ;

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Publication: New Braunfels Herald Zeitung

Location: New Braunfels, Texas

Issue Date: January 19, 1984

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